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The Internet

Submission + - Felon Became COO of Wikimedia Foundation 1

r writes: The San Francisco Chronicle recently found that the former COO of the Wikimedia Foundation had a questionable past, including being convicted of theft, drunken driving, and fleeing a car accident. "Before she left in July, Carolyn Bothwell Doran, 45, had moved up from a part-time bookkeeper for the Wikimedia Foundation and spent six months as chief operating officer, responsible for personnel and financial management. In March, she signed the small nonprofit's tax return, which listed more than $1.3 million in donations. At the time, she was on probation for a 2004 hit-and-run accident in Virginia that had landed her seven months in prison. Doran had multiple drunken-driving convictions, and records show earlier run-ins for theft, writing bad checks and wounding her boyfriend with a gunshot to the chest." How could Wikimedia fail to perform a basic background check on the person handling the foundation's financials?
The Internet

Submission + - San Francisco free Wi-Fi plan falls through (sfgate.com)

r writes: Earthlink backs out of contract negotiations to blanket San Francisco with free Wi-Fi, citing money problems. From the SF Chronicle article: The contract, which was three years in the making, had run into snags with the Board of Supervisors, but ultimately it was undone when Atlanta-based EarthLink announced Tuesday that it no longer believed providing citywide Wi-Fi was economically viable for the company. ... EarthLink spokesman Jerry Grasso said that EarthLink was willing to work with San Francisco but had decided that it "was not willing to work in the business model where EarthLink fronts all the money to build, own and operate the network."
The Courts

Submission + - British Police Identify Killer in Radiation Case

reporter writes: "According to a story by the Associated Press and a front-page story by "The Guardian", British authorities have identified Andrei Lugovoi to be the murderer who used radioactive pollonium-210 to kill Andrei Litvinenko. The British government will ask Moscow to extradite Lugovoi. "The Guardian" states, "The British government is preparing to demand the extradition of a Russian businessman to stand trial for the poisoning with polonium-210 of the former KGB officer Alexander Litvinenko. Senior Whitehall officials have told the Guardian that a Scotland Yard file on the murder which is about to be passed to the Crown Prosecution Service alleges that there is sufficient evidence against Andrei Lugovoi for the CPS to decide whether he should face prosecution.""
Announcements

Submission + - OCaml Summer Project

An anonymous reader writes: Jane Street Capital is sponsoring the OCaml Summer Project. It looks similar to Google's SOC, except it's much smaller (5-10 students) and it's 100% OCaml. At $6000 for 8 weeks, the pay looks pretty decent for a student. From the OSP website: "The OCaml Summer Project, in a nutshell: Jane Street Capital pays you to work on open source OCaml projects for a summer. Sounds pretty cool, huh?"
PC Games (Games)

Submission + - Boston Game Devs Make 8 Games in 36 Hours

Darius Kazemi writes: "This past weekend, a bunch of Boston-area game developers got together and did a 36-hour Boston Game Jam, inspired by the Indie Game Jam. We made eight games in 36 hours based on the theme of "shift" for platforms as diverse as PC, GBA, and cell phones. The games range from a surprisingly complex behavioral sim to a game where you have to squish your opponent in a 2D physics deathmatch. Most of the games are available for download right now, and some of them even include the source code. In days to come, we'll be adding developer diaries and other goodies."
Security

MySpace and GoDaddy Shut Down Security Site 344

Several readers wrote in with a CNET report that raises novel free-speech questions. MySpace asked GoDaddy to pull the plug on Seclists.org, a site run by Fyodor Vaskovich, the father of nmap. The site hosts a quarter million pages of mailing-list archives and the like. MySpace did not obtain a court order or, apparently, compose a DMCA takedown notice: it simply asked GoDaddy to remove a site that happened to archive a list of thousands of MySpace usernames and passwords, and GoDaddy complied. Fyodor says the takedown happened without prior notice. The site was unavailable for about seven hours until he found out what was happening and removed the offending posting. The CNET article concludes: "When asked if GoDaddy would remove the registration for a news site like CNET News.com, if a reader posted illegal information in a discussion forum and editors could not be immediately reached over a holiday, Jones replied: 'I don't know... It's a case-by-case basis.'"

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