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Comment Re:-Conflicted (Score 1) 167

Actually, it isn't. I explained before, according to Michael v First Chicago Corp. Illinois, 1985, "A finder of property acquires no rights in mislaid property, is entitled to possession of lost property against everyone except the true owner, and is entitled to keep abandoned property.". Therefore, unless the true owner comes to claim it from you after having tracked you down, and you refuse to return the wallet, it becomes theft. If you return it, or the owner doesn't turn up, it's nothing, since you're entitled to possession of the lost wallet against everyone but the original owner.

Comment Re:-Conflicted (Score 1) 167

At the end of the day, you have to answer to the person in the mirror, andlike and respect that person.

That's ... actually a rather nice way of summing up just what makes most people law-abiding, apart from the threat of punishment.
As for faith in mankind? Personally, I've lost that a long time ago, so it wouldn't be any surprise to me if I returned such a wallet and were turned away with barely a thanks. All the more reason for me to keep it, even if I'm enforcing the stereotype. My needs and interests come first for me, after all. And I assume the same for every rational person.

As far as I know, however, no rules state that you must try to locate the original owners. Given that my knowledge of US law is not exactly in-depth, I may stand corrected, though...

Comment Re:-Conflicted (Score 1) 167

Let me start from the end of your comment, your example. Frankly, aside from her family and friends, nobody cares if you don't help her. Oh sure, people say you're an asshole, and you should help her, take her to the hospital, etc. But tell them to do it themselves, and they make up an excuse and hurry on: Bystander Effect. On the other hand, raping her is a crime unto itself, punishable by law. That's where your analogy goes astray, in that you attempt to substitute a clearly illegal act for a legal, if unethical one.

Which leads me on to the first part of your comment. Given that the wallet was lost, it left possession of its owner. According to Michael v First Chicago Corp. Illinois, 1985, "A finder of property acquires no rights in mislaid property, is entitled to possession of lost property against everyone except the true owner, and is entitled to keep abandoned property.". Meaning unless the original owner tracks you down (which, let's face it, is quite unlikely in any moderately sized city, let alone a metropolis) and reclaims his wallet, it is, indeed, yours to keep. Whether it was ethical to keep or not.
The fact that there was contact information inside is quite irrelevant, given that the true owner has to claim the wallet from you to enforce his possession, in which case you must yield it. Sure, people might think even less of you for not even attempting to return it, but that doesn't make it any less legal.

Comment Re:-Conflicted (Score 2) 167

One is a crime, the other is a legitimate, if unethical action. If there's money to be made, ethics may take a backseat.

To put it into a better context for you, it's like finding a lost wallet on the ground: you should turn it in to the police, but frankly, aside from the owner, who cares if you don't? You won't get punished for taking it, but you might not get rewarded for returning it, whereas if you take it, the reward is guaranteed. After all, "Finders keepers, losers weepers!".

Comment Re:Infinite (Score 2) 181

If the game is offline, it could just as easily unload portions of the map that are outside of line-of-sight, or a given radius from the character. Events taking place in the unloaded areas that impact the visible ones may be abstracted away to use less memory, with terrain and mob states saved and loaded as the player approaches them again. That should take care of repetition as well as keeping the memory use constant.

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