Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Botnet

Botnets Using Ubiquity For Security 95

Trailrunner7 sends in this excerpt from Threatpost: "As major botnet operators have moved from top-down C&C infrastructures, like those employed throughout the 1990s and most of the last decade, to more flexible peer-to-peer designs, they also have found it much easier to keep their networks up and running once they're discovered. When an attacker at just one, or at most two, C&C servers was doling out commands to compromised machines, evading detection and keeping the command server online were vitally important. But that's all changed now. With many botnet operators maintaining dozens or sometimes hundreds of C&C servers around the world at any one time, the effect of taking a handful of them offline is negligible, experts say, making takedown operations increasingly complicated and time-consuming. It's security through ubiquity. Security researchers say this change, which has been occurring gradually in the last couple of years, has made life much more difficult for them. ... Researchers in recent months have identified and cleaned hundreds of domains being used by the Gumblar botnet, but that's had little effect on the botnet's overall operation."

Comment Re:Actually it usually does (Score 1) 336

Oh and I do love the saying "correlation is not causation" often said here, which is where crackpot anti-logic spills over into the /. group think. Correlation is in fact a prerequisite of causation, certainly a lack of correlation is evidence against causation?

The actual saying goes "Correlation does not denote causation", which I hope you agree, makes more sense.

-metric

Open Source

Why We Still Need OSI 108

ChiefMonkeyGrinder writes "In response to a comment on yesterday's blog, Simon Phipps writes about the old rivalry between the Free Software Foundation and the Open Source Initiative (OSI). 'I have been (and in plenty of ways still am) a critic of OSI, as well as a firm supporter and advocate of the FSF. I believe OSI should be a member organisation with a representative leadership. ... But the OSI still plays a very important and relevant role in the world of software freedom.' For instance: Licence approvals have become a much more onerous process, with the emphasis on avoiding creation of new licences, updating old or flawed ones, and encouraging the retirement of redundant ones. It would be great to see the stewards of some of the (in retrospect) incorrectly approved licences ask for their retirement."
Space

Project M Could Send Every Scientist To the Moon, By Proxy 150

An anonymous reader writes with this interesting bit of speculation: "NASA can put humanoids on the Moon in just 1000 days. They would be controlled by scientists on Earth using motion capture suits, giving them the feeling of being on the lunar surface. If they can achieve this for real, the results for science research of our satellite could be amazing."
Power

Fuel Cell Marvel "Bloom Box" Gaining Momentum 562

Many sources are continuing to excitedly report on the latest in a long line of startups chasing the holy grail of power sources. This incarnation, the "Bloom Box" from Bloom Energy, promises a power-plant-in-a-box that you can literally put in your backyard, and has received backing from companies like eBay, Google, Staples, FedEx, and Walmart. CBS recently aired an exclusive interview with K.R. Sridhar about his shiny new box. "So what is a Bloom Box exactly? Well, $700,000 to $800,000 will buy you a 'corporate sized' unit. Inside the box are a unique kind of fuel cell consisting of ceramic disks coated with green and black 'inks.' The inks somehow transform a stream of methane (or other hydrocarbons) and oxygen into power, when the box heats up to its operating temperature of 1,000 degrees Celsius. To get a view of the cost and benefits, eBay installed 5 of the boxes nine months ago. It says it has saved $100,000 USD on energy since."

Comment Re:It's friendly (Score 1) 428

Like I said, the article didn't say, but I doubt they are using object detection like facial recognition. It's easy to toss around concepts like "see humans", and impossible to get software to do it 100% of the time. I'd be willing to bet they are using infrared to detect heat, and motion to detect the size and direction of the moving objects. Maybe when the TED talk comes out we will have more info.. can't wait.

-metric

Comment Re:Use it (Score 1) 532

What do you think about intermediate variables that are not strictly necessary?

I'll often find myself coding some physics equations from specifications written on paper. Obviously, they are always written in math notations. What I end up doing, if not limited by cpu/ram, is to create a stack variable for each term in the equations. Basically, I'll try to make the code look as much like the paper specs as possible. The specs will ALWAYS change, and trying to figure out how the two relate some years later is a real pita. Also, I'll always preface everything with some comment like "The following is from foobar specs dated Jan 1st 2002" for the reverse reasons.

-metric

Comment Re:It's friendly (Score 1) 428

Well I didn't read anything about stereoscopic vision, so I'm guessing it is using the motion of the mosquito to track. If that is the case, then you could get hit if you stand completely still.
I'd be completely wrong if they are using infrared vision, or facial recognition, but the article didn't mention.
The Military

Directed Energy Weapon Downs Ballistic Missile 297

A**masher writes "In a test off the Califoria coast late last night, Boeing's Airborne Laser successfully destroyed a sub-launched ballistic missile. 'This was the first directed energy lethal intercept demonstration against a liquid-fuel boosting ballistic missile target from an airborne platform,' reported the Missile Defense Agency. It should be noted that destroying a liquid-fueled ballistic missile is generally considered easier than killing a solid-fueled equivalent due to the relative fragility of the fueling and other systems."

Comment Privacy? (Score 5, Insightful) 310

The problem, however, will be the increasing backlash Google is seeing from the general public over how much data the company already controls on their online habits.

Doesn't seem like a problem for them so far. I'm fairly sure only a tiny percent of the people using social networking services really care about privacy. Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg came out and said Privacy is no longer a social norm. The real hurdle for Google Buzz is going to be migrating the massive social graph that exists on Facebook. The usefulness of these sites is mainly due to who is participating. I'm guessing that's why they injected Buzz directly into gmail.. where they already have a sizable dominance.

-metric

Slashdot Top Deals

"Inquiry is fatal to certainty." -- Will Durant

Working...