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Comment Re:...including some placed by people... (Score 3, Insightful) 330

You only have to adjust your definition of 'terrorist comnnections'.

For the NSA, an Nth degree connection is most likely enough.
As in: your number has in the past called some number, that was also called by a number which had been in contact with a number which is suspected to have once been used by someone who's name is on one of their lists.
This kind of 'meta-information' is exactly what they are fishing for after all.

I am more interested in how they got 'some' with no terrorist connections. Maybe only brand new phone numbers on their first use?

Comment Re:Paranoia (Score 1) 303

I don't see how this is paranoia.
I wouldn't use the same password for my phone and my banking acount. But the fact you can't change your fingerprints pretty much forces you to.
Worse, you will use the same print in the future, forever.

So how long is that password going to last, with all the regular leaks, phone-malware and whatnot? How many years?
If any single application you gave the fingerprint to has a security hole, just one of them, then all other are immedeately compromised. And there is no way you can change that, even if you knew it happened.

And the best part is, because the 'password' is so strongly linked to your person, everyone who got it can easily figure out which other locks it might open for them, other than your phone.

Lastly, the argument of 'the xyz could do it if they really wanted' is just a bad one and I'm sick of hearing it.
This is still a question of economics.
Sure there could be agents following everyone around, grabbing fingerprints from the used glasses in restaurants and so on... would only cost like a trillion dollars until we have all the data.
Or we have them all upload their prints to their phones, which we already have backdoors into anyway, so it costs one of our IT people 10 minutes to issue the download command.
One thing will never happen, the other is more than likely.

Comment Re:Short term: yes, long term: even more (Score 1) 736

That idea is flawed.

As soon as we can do more with less, we simply go and do much more.

And if you wanted to live a life by the average standards of a 1960s household, you could actually do that with 10-15 hours of work per week as far as products are concerend, that are actually affected by automation. The things that would keep you from achieving this are most likely exactly the things that did not get much of an efficieny boost through automation: services and basic resources.

Comment Re:Dominican Republic, Iran and Thailand stats (Score 4, Funny) 322

"I would really like to know how the U.S. fatality rate of 11.4 per 100,000 compares to that of other nations, like the Dominican Republic, Iran, and Thailand, but I'm too lazy.
Ah screw it, I'll just make it a news topic on slashdot and wait until someone else does it for karma."
- timothy

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