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Android

Submission + - PPTP works on Android (google.com)

Belial6 writes: One of my ongoing complaints with Android has been that from very early on, it has included PPTP in the OS, but it never worked. Every time I got a new version of the OS, I would again try to connect to my DD-WRT router, and every time it would fail. I would search the internet for an answer, and from all of search results it appeared that PPTP VPN was just broken in Android. Worse yet, it looked like it was something that was never going to be fixed. It looks like I have the problem is that DNS breaks VPN on Android. I have now tested a Nexus 7, an HTC G2 and a Nexus One. They all work if I put in the IP address directly, and they all fail if I try to resolve the IP via DNS. Has anyone else tried this?
Android

Submission + - Google Donates $20,000 to Eclipse Foundation (thepowerbase.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In response to user's concerns about performance issues on the latest Eclipse release, Google’s Open Source Programs Office has agreed to make a $20,000 donation to the Eclipse Foundation so they can setup a dedicated performance testing lab.

Considering Google ships Eclipse with every copy of their Android development kit, improving it means happier Android developers. Will improvements to Eclipse increase Android adoption rate among developers?

Comment Re:Teachers (Score 2) 110

Are you seriously complaining that teaches ONLY work 53 hours a week? Are you sick in the head?

You seem to making the argument that working 50-100 hours per week should be the goal of every Citizen. Screw that. I want to enjoy life with my family. You can work your 100hrs/week. Enjoy that heart attack at age 45 and leave teachers alone.
Apple

Submission + - Apple adds Galaxy S III phone to revised suit (wsj.com)

another random user writes: Apple, accusing Samsung Electronics Co of flooding the market with “copycat products,” added the Galaxy S III smartphone to a list of products that it says infringe Apple patents.

Apple’s revised a complaint filed yesterday in federal court in San Jose, California, follows a $1.05 billion jury verdict against Samsung on Aug. 24. The jury, in a separate case in the same court, found that Samsung infringed six of seven Apple patents at stake in the trial. In that case, Apple seeks a US sales ban on eight Samsung smartphone models and a tablet computer.

Apple, in yesterday’s filing, alleges Samsung continues to “flood the market with copycat products.” The maker of the iPhone has made similar allegations in the follow-on case before. In yesterday’s filing, Apple said Samsung has sold infringing products through August, including its “current flagship device, the Galaxy S III” smartphone.

NASA

Submission + - NASA craft to leave asteroid heads for dwarf planet Ceres (mnn.com)

DevotedSkeptic writes: "NASA's Dawn probe is gearing up to depart the giant asteroid Vesta next week and begin the long trek to the dwarf planet Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt.

The Dawn spacecraft is slated to leave Vesta on the night of Sept. 4 (early morning Sept. 5 EDT), ending a 14-month stay at the 330-mile-wide (530 kilometers) body. The journey to Ceres should take roughly 2.5 years, with Dawn reaching the dwarf planet in early 2015, researchers said.

"Thrust is engaged, and we are now climbing away from Vesta atop a blue-green pillar of xenon ions," Dawn chief engineer and mission director Marc Rayman, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement. "We are feeling somewhat wistful about concluding a fantastically productive and exciting exploration of Vesta, but now have our sights set on dwarf planet Ceres.""

Mars

Submission + - Curiosity Rover Begins Eastbound Trek (nasa.gov)

DevotedSkeptic writes: "NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has set off from its landing vicinity on a trek to a science destination about a quarter mile (400 meters) away, where it may begin using its drill.

The rover drove eastward about 52 feet (16 meters) on Tuesday, its 22nd Martian day after landing. This third drive was longer than Curiosity's first two drives combined. The previous drives tested the mobility system and positioned the rover to examine an area scoured by exhaust from one of the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft engines that placed the rover on the ground.

"This drive really begins our journey toward the first major driving destination, Glenelg, and it's nice to see some Martian soil on our wheels," said mission manager Arthur Amador of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "The drive went beautifully, just as our rover planners designed it."

Glenelg is a location where three types of terrain intersect. Curiosity's science team chose it as a likely place to find a first rock target for drilling and analysis.

"We are on our way, though Glenelg is still many weeks away," said Curiosity Project Scientist John Grotzinger of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "We plan to stop for just a day at the location we just reached, but in the next week or so we will make a longer stop."

During the longer stop at a site still to be determined, Curiosity will test its robotic arm and the contact instruments at the end of the arm. At the location reached Tuesday, Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) will collect a set of images toward the mission's ultimate driving destination, the lower slope of nearby Mount Sharp. A mosaic of images from the current location will be used along with the Mastcam images of the mountain taken at the spot where Curiosity touched down, Bradbury Landing. This stereo pair taken about 33 feet (10 meters) apart will provide three-dimensional information about distant features and possible driving routes."

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