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Comment Re:expensive cupcakes (Score 2) 611

If by $3.95 you mean $1.50 then perhaps. $2 on the outside, and that's overpriced.

The $3+ drinks are usually made with milk and/or flavor and espresso. Drip coffee is still cheap. Yes, even at big chain coffee shops. If you don't want to pay that much, don't buy expensive fancy drinks.

If I could still find $.50 drip coffee, I imagine it would taste like crap.

(Unless, of course, you live in a large metro where prices are higher, but that's all your fault).

Comment Re:Haught isn't in favor of creationism (Score 1) 717

As Einstein put it, "Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind." Claims to the contrary demand extraordinary proof.

On the contrary - the empirical project can get along just fine without the supernatural.

To be a good empiricist, one must relegate the supernatural to that realm that is entirely untouchable by observation. Or, in other words, let God live in places so small that it doesn't matter. If that counts as still "believing", then fine. Fully one third of the US population holds an inerrant view of the Christian bible - the difference in beliefs between that group and "an empiricist who lets God live in small places" is staggering.

Comment Amusing (Score 1) 496

I have been arguing that this would happen for at least a decade. In an economy like ours it is a real problem as the number of jobs decreases while productivity increases (or, at least jobs fail to track with productivity). You end up with a lot of broke potential consumers. Ruh-Roh.

Either we start figuring out how to get by with everyone working 20ish hours a week or Marx's economic collapse will finally happen.

I'd much rather work 20 hours per week.

Comment Re:Still not a sport, try as you may.. (Score 1) 351

John M. Roberts defined games in three categories, paraphrased here:

"The categories proposed by Roberts at al. are staged; games of chance do not require any skill or strategy (dice games, coin tosses), games of strategy may or may not involve chance but do not involve physical skill (chess, go, poker), and games of physical skill require skill, and may or may not involve chance or strategy. Amusingly, this would place [video] games in the same category as footraces, boxing, and soccer – that of physical skill (1959:597-598)."

cite: Roberts, John M., Malcolm J. Arth, and Robert R. Bush. 1959. “Games in Culture”. American Anthropologist, 61(4):597-605.

Roberts was talking about games with a competitive element, where there must be a clear winner and loser.

Who are you to say that actions per second are any less determined by physical prowess than running and throwing a ball or swinging a stick? Obviously the strategic element in a game like starcraft greater than that of baseball.

Comment Re:Duke TIP (Score 1) 116

Wow, when I did it all that happened were drugs, booze, and sex. I was just there for the math.

I'd expect most of the people capable of gaining admission to such programs will do quite well with or without them.

Comment Where was the love when they dropped their prices? (Score 1) 722

They dropped prices a few years ago. Raising them to wean people off the discs-in-the-mail is more or less inevitable. Unlimited streaming is still only $9.99, half what Netflix cost five years ago.

I pay $7.99 and never use a disc. After the change I'll pay $9.99 for streaming only and get more or less the same service. Still less than it was five years ago.

What's the big deal?

Comment Re:No one? (Score 1) 281

All that shit costs more money than even an overpriced movie once per week. Big-budget movies are cheap.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with catching a movie now and then. Cinema is not a lesser form of entertainment than your suggested alternatives, merely different.

Well, other than burning man - but I'd rather sit through Battlefield earth, in 3D, for a solid weekend than attend that.

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