Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Because they can (Score 4, Informative) 371

That is the only honest answer that there is. As long as artificial monopolies like 'regions' are tolerated it will only continue. There is no valid reason why software or other companies should be able to use globalism for cheaper labor whilst denying consumers globalism for cheaper products. I don't see how things are going to change until world governments start demanding better treatment though.

Why are textbooks 1/10th the cost in Indonesia? Why couldn't I buy Top Gear in the US for years when it was available for cheap overseas in the discount bin? Why are Corvette's twice the price in Europe? The list goes on and the answer come back to artificial monopolies charging more because they can. Introduce competition, make grey market imports legal, demand manufacturers honor warranties regardless of the country of origin, allow people to buy software in any country regardless of where they live etc......

Comment Reality in politically incorrect (Score 2, Interesting) 474

Pick a subject, any subject, the reality of that subject is politically incorrect to someone, somewhere. You are politically incorrect to your ancestors just as your descendants will condemn you for being politically incorrect. I say this and it doesn't matter who you, what your culture is, where you live, your religion (or lack of religion) what your values are, what your accomplishments are or any other given thing. History is politically incorrect and it will remain that way because that is human nature.l

Articles like this are rage mongering and professional trolling deserve to admonished. A little more tolerance by society would go a lot longer to ease race / religious / gender / etc relations that mongering articles like this ever will. It's why MLK was so popular and the like's of Jessie Jackson can never get past 3rd rate achievers. It's the difference between trolling for dollars and dreaming of tolerance.

/rant off

Comment Re:Historicaly accurate (Score 3, Interesting) 330

True enough on what you have said. The sad thing is Edison /was/ a genius and did invent quite a few things on his own. He didn't need to steal ideas from other people like he did in order to be one of the greatest inventors in history.

Unfortunately he was an incredible asshole and went ahead and stole other peoples ideas anyways. I have heard it said that Edison was histories first great patent troll, and I think you could make a fair argument for that.

Comment Historicaly accurate (Score 4, Insightful) 330

Does anyone want to see something historically accurate? Do you really want to see Jobs portrayed accurately?

It will never happen because the hero worship that is going to sell this movie would die if people knew the real Steve Jobs. You know the guy that stole other peoples ideas, actively suppressed worker wages, humiliated employees and random people he met, screwed over Steve Jobs, refused his own daughter for years, tore apart people's life work, disrespected other companies intellectual property and then started World War P.

You could fill this thread with war stories from the people that Steve Jobs burned. That's now what's going to sell this movie at this time, give it a few years and someone might be willing to do so, but until the idol worship tempers down it simply wont sell.

Comment Tie the cap to the wages (Score 1) 605

Want to get real about this and show this isn't just the same old story of employers refusing to pay living wages to Americans and paying a pittance to people who come over her on H1B?

Tie the cap to wages and benefits that are being earned for each given field. If there is truly a shortage of 'database administrators' than the average pay of 'database administrators' will have risen as the market worked it's magic. For every 10% they want to raise the H1B visa rate they need show that the market has raised the average pay of a certain job by 10%.

Let the market do it's work, quite outsourcing the kinds of jobs that government is in every other scenario /desperate/ to create and let those who want to come here come here.

One more thing, if the best an brightest want to become true immigrants and not simply take our jobs we should encourage that. Make a fast track to citizenship that is tied with the H1B. Allow someone on H1B to fastrack the citizenship process and then terminate the visa of anyone that doesn't earn their citizenship within that given amount of time. Now instead of having 'foreigners' taking jobs, we have the best and brightest becoming Americans and having a personal vested interest that they otherwise would never have.

Comment The biggest issue is this one (Score 1) 165

So Mega, or anyone else who gains control of the Mega server sending the crypto algorithms, can turn off that encryption or steal the user's private key, which would allow decryption of all past and future uploads."

Correct. Fact #1: Our FAQ states exactly that and warns people that do not trust us to refrain from logging into the site (but they could, in theory, still safely use MEGA through client apps from vendors they trust). Fact #2: Any software maker offering online application updates is able to plant Trojan code into specific targets' computers, with much more far-reaching consequences.

If they can turn off the encryption than they have lost plausible deniability. This is bad for their survival if they want to be able to claim that they don't know what they have on their servers (a brilliant move). This puts everyone's data at stake as they can be sued or re-seized back into oblivion as before.

This may have been done to allow them to de-dupe data on their servers to save space as a practical logistical issue. This issue needs to be addressed above and beyond any other issues. Until Mega resolves this issue with a clear and unwavering answer that they /cannot/ see their data it is probably best not to upload anything confidential just yet.

The servers are now a single point of failure and the target of attack, this is a really big deal. Please fix this Kim, I want to see your service succeed.

Comment Re:Microsoft needs Dell (Score 1) 151

That is one thing I haven't got a clue on. Understand the industry, sure, understanding how things like that work? Beat's me.

I have seen amazing amounts of control done with minority stakes over the years. It's always baffled just how much control you can have with a minority stake, and I have never understood why and how that works.

Comment Re:As a European (Score 1) 151

Is it really this simple? I have dealt with one form of regulation (including some Euro regs) for many years now and I have never encountered something that simple. I don't know enough about how they are trying to do things, but having been there - done that with other regulations over the years I've learned bureaucracy is never simple.

I'm not opposed to the concenpt of the 'right to forget', it's the logistical details that make me go, 'wait a moment'. If you have any good primers on the actual in's and out's and not on the propaganda I'd be curious to read up on it.

Comment Re:Microsoft needs Dell (Score 1) 151

I agree with all of your points that you have made, so no arguments there. You certainly sound like you've been in the industry for a 'long, long time'. As for this being a smart move, I'm inclined to call it more of a strategic move by Microsoft than a smart move. The biggest concern from their point is that for many years Dell has been the number one supplier of computers worldwide.

If they fail, or more likely, if they start to fail and shrink as so many computer companies before them have done that is going to leave a void in the industry. As you pointed out other companies will fill that void. As you point out any number of lesser companies would fill that void. From Microsoft's standpoint those companies are far less likely to have their interests in line with their own.

The last thing Microsoft wants is a number of computer companies growing up and being willing to get serious about not using their products. Legacy companies can't risk their relationship with Microsoft, but up and coming companies have more flexibility in how they do things, especially when they are based out of China.

You certainly remember "Wintel" and everything that meant, and you'll understand my point when I get a bit frustrated having to explain to people new to the industry what that means. Microsoft is just about out of "Wintel's" and just doesn't have that many companies that they can count on anymore.

On a practical side, many of these companies will be more difficult to secure payment from than Dell. Think of it as being a bit like Wal-Mart, they may not pay well, but they /always/ pay on time. There is a lot of value in that for someone that wants to count on a dependable revenue stream.

Slashdot Top Deals

If the aborigine drafted an IQ test, all of Western civilization would presumably flunk it. -- Stanley Garn

Working...