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Comment Re:Already Run Out (Score 1) 442

The IP market is not a free market, you can't really sell IP addresses like that. Instead what would happen is that HP would either have to become an ISP (or spin off an ISP division) or release the block(s) back to ARIN. ARIN would then assign them according to their existing policies. Further more, new blocks cost a yearly upkeep fee whereas if you were grandfathered in (like HP was) then there is no fee.

Because of this there isn't really any incentive at all (except perhaps some very very small PR) for returning blocks, and that's not even thinking about the costs associated with moving to a new IP range or the abject stupidity of NAT.

Comment Selling free copies is absurd (Score 1) 260

Ebook piracy shows no such thing. What is shows is that when your trying to sell something in a market where the cost to copy is nil, then your business model is broken. Artificial scarcity on the internet is simply impossible and at best all you can hope for is to get people to pay for convenience.

Obviously writers can't make money through concerts or t-shirts; but there will always be a market for those of us of enjoy real, physical books. There is also a market for public speakers, many of whom are writers. Does this mean that all writers will be able to make a living? No. However it's neither reasonable nor feasible to allow everyone to make a living doing what they enjoy.

Submission + - Cdn Record Industry Facing $60B Copyright Lawsuit (michaelgeist.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: Michael Geist is reporting that the four major record labels that comprise the Canadian Recording Industry Association have been hit with the largest copyright infringement lawsuit in Canadian history. A class action claims $60 billion in damages for unauthorized and unpaid uses of recordings. The record labels openly admit at least $50 million in liability but believe working to pay the outstanding amounts "would be an unproductive use of time". The plaintiffs, led by the estate of jazz musician Chet Baker, are also seeking punitive damages given the strict enforcement of copyright by the same labels against consumers.

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