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Comment Re:Long term... (Score 1) 585

Amazon says hello.

Classic gaming, at least from a hardware perspective, is a pretty big business. If you can't find an adapter for your controller, you can almost always find somebody who built one in an afternoon from ten dollars worth of parts.

As far as special keys on emulated systems, it's very rare that they aren't provided for. This specifically talks about the Commodore 64 emulators available and how they provide for special Commodore keys.

The lesson here? For every one of us that has two pieces of old hardware sitting in a crate in the corner, there's some crazy guy still writing software for it, another crazy guy building hardware for it, and a third writing an emulator or driver for a modern system/OS.

Linux

Submission + - Linode Turns 7, Announces Big RAM Increase (linode.com)

palegray.net writes: "For anyone interested in hosting, Linode turns seven today and has announced an impressive RAM increase across all plans (512 MB at the low end, 20 GB on the high end). There's an ongoing discussion of the announcement over at Hacker News for those interested. As a disclaimer, I have worked for Linode for a little over a year now, but I was a very happy customer for five years. For Slashdotters who already have a Linode, you'll need to issue a reboot to use the new memory; sorry about ruining your uptime ;)."

Comment Re:it flies in the face of common sense (Score 1) 306

What's the point in having a second trial or an appeal if you aren't allowed to do things differently? Then again, this is law we're talking about, so logic and common sense probably don't apply.

This is NOT law; this is baloney. The RIAA lawyers wouldn't know the law if it hit them on the head.

I thought hitting people on the head WAS the RIAA legal strategy.

Comment Re:users... (Score 1) 958

And let me chime in on the ZOMG install FOSS tip -- this is a great opportunity. You've already got a tailor-made excuse. "X user is using X software and we do not have a license. We can either pay X dollars for a license or use this freely available alternative that will provide the same functionality." In this economic climate, they won't even consider the pay software in most cases.

"Photoshop user is using Photoshop software and we do not have a license. We can either pay Photoshop dollars for a license or use this freely available alternative that will provide the same functionality."

"Joe Blow user is using Joe Bloe software and we do not have a license. We can either pay Joe Blow dollars for a license or use this freely available alternative that will provide the same functionality."

"700 user is using 700 software and we do not have a license. We can either pay 700 dollars for a license or use this freely available alternative that will provide the same functionality."

These equations make no sense!

Comment Re:Offtopic (Score 1) 90

Ontopic: All open source games suck. I have played many of them and they are all horrible. I suspect that this is only "news" because of the game's license and not because the game is even remotely good.

As an open source game programmer, I take offense to this. Heavy offense. As an open source gamer, I disagree. Open source games are great because if you find a problem, you can dig and and fix it. You're free to improve them.

Contrast this with, for example, Marvel: Ultimate Alliance. I love the concept, I love the gameplay, but what I don't love is the huge number of typos in the dialog. I can't do a thing about it. On the other hand, I was able to do a complete overhaul of the dialog in FreedroidRPG, and I'm now a member of the dev team.

As far as your experience with open source games, I doubt you've played a significant portion of them, and I highly doubt you've kept up with the updates. Yes, updates, new developments that get pushed out for public consumption. You don't get that with many proprietary games. You might get 3 patches, and that's it. No new content, just bugfixes. *That* sucks.

Comment Re:The 3 patents (Score 1) 644

I'll grant I'm using Debian Etch, so I'm probably a little behind the curve in terms of what's available in cutting-edge Linux,

That could be a very good reason.

By the way, for the record, I'm using Slackware with the default kernel, and have been for a couple of years now. That's just in case anyone wants to accuse me of using some bleeding edge distro or kernel.

Comment Re:The 3 patents (Score 3, Informative) 644

TomTom needs this driver because they store the system on an SD card with the aim that systems can be upgraded/fixed by directly accessing the filesystem from a Windows PC, so they have to use either FAT32 or NTFS, and as Linux's support of NTFS is essentially a joke

Linux's NTFS support is a joke? When did it stop working? I've been using it without problems for a couple of years now.

Comment Re:Or to not quote him partially... (Score 1) 869

I sincerely hope you're griping about the fact that Fedora forced its users to switch to KDE 4.0, which KDE strongly discouraged distros from switching to in the first place. If you think of it as an open-source tech demo, you're close to the purpose. A complete rewrite takes time, and KDE is all about openness. So, while they were busy working on a newer, more flexible version, they allowed people to try it themselves. The upcoming 4.2 release is extremely usable. I'm thrilled that I can boot up my desktop, and wow my non-Linux-using friends with it.

So my point is this. Fedora screwed up here, not KDE. KDE followed its principles, and has maintained the entire time that what they were working on was not "ready for production use."

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