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Comment Re:Not surprising.... (Score 3, Insightful) 490

What a lovely little world you live in. It's one in which people who don't agree with you don't "want a good product".

I use an iPhone and continue to use it because it is a better product for my needs than the Android. I'm not being a doofus like you and claiming that the iPhone is a better phone for your needs.

It would seem that the only honest conclusion is that, of the survey population, more iPhone users than Android users believe that the iPhone best meets their needs and will continue to meet their needs.

Submission + - The Cloud Computing Mind Map (oreilly.com)

smack.addict writes: The author of Cloud Application Architectures has posted a mind map that helps make sense of the cloud computing space. It breaks down the full cloud stack, provides insight into who the key players are, and what you need to know as you embark on a cloud computing project

Comment Re:Monty Needs to STFU (Score 1) 278

So what?

When he sold to Sun, he made his cash and gave up any rights to say what happened to the software. From that point on, it could have been purchased by the devil himself and Monty should still shut the fuck up.

He's wanting it both ways. He wants to have his cash and influence the direction of MySQL. The fact is, Oracle bought MySQL fairly. Monty needs to stop whining.

Submission + - Your Cloud Needs a Sys Admin (oreilly.com)

smack.addict writes: Cloud computing has deluded programmers into thinking they no longer need sys admins. The cloud enables the automation of many of the tedious tasks on which programmers have traditionally looked to sys admins to support. Without those barriers, it takes just a credit card for programmer to fancy themselves as sys admins. Don't let the ease of provisioning fool you; your cloud needs a sys admin.

Comment Re:The non-competitive product argument is total B (Score 1) 125

It has nothing to do with scanning books.

Google gets sued and comes up with a settlement agreement to pay off those suing.

Little company X does the same thing and gets sued, but can't fight the suit and can't afford to pay off a settlement.

Because the grounds for suing are completely bogus, Google is essentially buying a monopoly with their settlement. They are now establishing that anyone who wants to do what they are doing will have to pay hush money to avoid a lawsuit.

Big expensive hush money for fair use.

Comment Re:Authors Guild Recommends It if You Plan to Sue (Score 4, Insightful) 125

The settlement is for a bogus lawsuit.

The problem is this: Google has the ability to pay their way out of this nuisance lawsuit. Others do not. Thus Google ends up with a defacto monopoly.

From the author's perspective, however, there is no ability to pursue a bogus lawsuit to a conclusion more favorable than free money they shouldn't be getting in the first place.

Of course William Morris is against it. The settlement is bad for them and bad for our society. It's bad for authors, even. But the only thing worse for authors is opting out of the settlement.

The Internet

Submission + - Is an Open Cloud Worth Wanting? (oreilly.com)

smack.addict writes: "Caught in the middle of the back-and forth between Microsoft and the Open Cloud Manifesto team is the question, what does it mean for the cloud to be Open? All of the vendors in the cloud space have paid lip service to the idea of Openness in the cloud; and most everyone believes that being "Open" is a "good thing". In an environment in which few people agree on the specifics of defining the term "cloud computing", what exactly does it mean to have an Open Cloud?"

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