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Operating Systems

The 'Linux Inside' Stigma 366

New submitter dtschmitz highlights the success of the Google Chromebook to underscore what, in his view, is a serious Linux brand image problem. "It's remarkable how Google doesn't mention the word Linux anywhere in their marketing of the Google Chromebook. I mean, it's running the Linux Kernel, so shouldn't it be Google Linux instead of ChromeOS? Why did Google carefully avoid references to Linux? It's all a very carefully crafted, well executed plan of elegant branding and image making. ... The profile of this user is that of someone who really doesn't care anything about the technical underpinnings of a device. They are not sophisticated technophiles by any means. They have a set number of things which they wish to do--recreational surfing, banking, email, an occasional letter, not complicated. ... Google didn't mention Linux because they know it will scare buyers away. That's unfortunate, but true. And we need to come to terms with that fact and work towards improving the 'Linux Inside' brand image.
Politics

Submission + - White House threatened Bob Woodward for Obama expose (examiner.com)

An anonymous reader writes: On Wednesday, the White House sent a threatening email to Washington Post editor Bob Woodward in response to a column in which the veteran journalist suggested that President Barack Obama and cabinet official Jack Lew lied about the sequestration cuts. In a Feb. 27 appearance on CNN's "Situation Room," Woodward declined to identify the senior administration official who had threatened him.

"They're not happy at all," said Woodward. "It was said very clearly, you will regret doing this. He added that he was "very uncomfortable to have the White House telling reporters you're going to regret doing something. Let's hope it's not the strategy."

Cellphones

Submission + - Smartphone Screen Real Estate: How Big Is Big Enough? (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: "Aside from the terrible nickname (it sounds like a term for the spoiled offspring of fabulous people), phablets are somewhat controversial because they seem to be the epitome of inflated phone sizes. A lot of people wanted bigger, and this is “bigger” to the extreme. A larger screen on a smartphone is attractive for obvious reasons, but surely there’s a limit. So how big is too big? If you’re not into parsing out the particulars of form factors and use cases, here’s a really easy way to figure out if your phone or phablet is too big: Can you hold the device in one hand and 1) unlock the phone, 2) type out a text message with your thumb, and 3) adjust the volume with the rocker without using your other hand? If not, you might need a smaller phone."

Comment Re:Ironic (Score 2) 270

Surely they could solve this using a verbal code.

I guess "secure" means more than "secret" in the context of TFA. As it is mentioned that regular radio can be triangulated, hence I am assuming that "secure radio" should be protected from that. Which might mean serious frequency hopping and probably bouncing signal from big birds flying above etc...

Comment Re:They are behind the schedule (Score 1) 94

I used to think like, that there is a threshold, a stage of development, after which the machines would start developing so fast. It was going to modify Moore's Law as instead of "every two years" it would be "every two minutes".... Now I think there is a problem with that approach. The efficiency of computing resources are dropping. I am writing this message on a computer which has maybe ten times of storage and computing power, that my whole school had back in 1996, when I was graduated. I used to be responsible of such statistics there; 13 k undergrads, 4 k masters and above level students and maybe 300 full professors with lots of lower levels and assistants were both making scientific research and use those devices from Internet to games. At the moment, aside from writing to /. most serious thing I use this computer is reading mail, and some gaming.

In short we are producing and using serious amount of IT resources, but those are not being utilized as efficient as expected in the past....

Security

Submission + - Apple's Secret Plan to Join iPhones with Airport Security

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Currently — as most of us know — TSA agents briefly examine government ID and boarding passes as each passenger presents their documents at a checkpoint at the end of a security line but Thom Patterson writes at CNN that under a 2008 Apple patent application that was approved in July and filed under the working title "iTravel," a traveler's phone would automatically send electronic identification to a TSA agent as soon as the traveler got in line and as each traveler waits in line, TSA agents would examine the electronic ID at an electronic viewing station. Next, at the X-ray stations, a traveler's phone would confirm to security agents that the traveler's ID had already been checked. Apple's patent calls for the placement of special kiosks (PDF) around the airport which will automatically exchange data with your phone via a close range wireless technology called near field communication (NFC). Throughout the process, the phone photo could be displayed on a screen for comparison with the traveler. Facial recognition software could be included in the process. Several experts say a key question that must be answered is: How would you prove that the phone is yours? To get around this problem, future phones or electronic ID may require some form of biometric security function including photo, fingerprint and photo retinal scan comparisons. Of course, there is still a ways to go. If consumers, airlines, airports and the TSA don't embrace the NFC kiosks, experts say it's unlikely Apple's vision would become reality. "First you would have to sell industry on Apple's idea. Then you'd have to sell it to travel consumers," says Neil Hughes of Apple Insider. "It's a chicken-and-egg problem.""

Submission + - SPAM: Light at the end of the property tunnel? – "Buy My House Now"

francescamorgan writes: "In these tough economic times, it can be hard to sit back and smell the roses. Maybe you used to spend your weekends taking drives out into the countryside with the kids, stopping for lunch at a quaint old pub and returning home after your adventures to the comfort of the house that you turned into a home."
Link to Original Source
Patents

Journal Journal: Samsung will sue Apple tomorrow ?

Tomorrow looks to be the day of the antipcited Apple release of the iPhone 5 but other sources tell of a threat to people being able to buy an iPhone directly after the announcement as they usually can. Samsung is in the final stages to start a court case against Apple if it is revealed that iPhone 5 support LTA or 4G in its phone.Apple has not licensed LTE from Samsung. Samsung has a large number of patents in the LTE tech and probably do what they can to stop Apple from selling their iPhon

Graphics

Submission + - Converting RSS feeds to a dynamic 3D scene in 120 lines of code (nyud.net) 4

descubes writes: "Tao Presentations is a 3D presentation tool based on a 3D dynamic document description language. This makes it very easy for developers to create their own 3D shows, illustrate talks in an innovative way, even build small interactive 3D applications. An example included in the latest release grabs RSS feeds from a variety of sources (including Slashdot) and turns them into a 3D scene, all in real-time and in about 120 lines of code. It fetches the pictures directly from the web site and maps them on 3D shapes. And this is only a starting point. Tao Presentations can display 3D objects, drive the majority of 3D displays (including glasses-free 3D displays from Alioscopy, Philips or Tridelity), use GLSL shaders for advanced effects, and much more.

Tao Presentations is free (as in beer), and the document description language is based on the free (as in speech) XL programming language. If you get bored of Powerpoint and are looking for a more stimulating alternative, Tao Presentations may be what you were looking for."

Microsoft

Submission + - Apache webserver updated to ignore Do Not Track settings in IE10 (arstechnica.com)

exomondo writes: An Apache webserver update has been released that ignores the 'Do Not Track' privacy setting sent from IE. Patch author and Adobe employee Roy Fielding states "The only reason DNT exists is to express a non-default option" but critics of the patch point out that the initial Windows 8 setup explicitly points out that if you choose 'Express' setup as opposed to 'Custom' then 'Do Not Track' will be turned on.

Comment Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (Score 1) 282

Who asked a permission to run any software on a device bought and paid for?
You might not have permission (especialy for Apple) to run a software you obtained a license to, on each hardware you wanted to do so. You cannot run iOS image you have lifted of your iPhone on a Nokia or God forbid, on a Samsung. However when you buy a hardware (and assuming it is not a Ferrari), you can run any software on it. You can use it as a door-stop if you like. Thus if like to do so and able to do so, you can run Android, or Linux on a Macbook.

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