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Open Source

Submission + - Linux 3.5 released

diegocg writes: Linux 3.5 has been released. New features include support for metadata checksums in Ext4, userspace probes for performance profiling with systemtap/perf, a simple sandboxing mechanism that can filter syscalls, a new network queue management algorithm designed to fight bufferbloat, support for checkpointing and restoring TCP connections, support for TCP Early Retransmit (RFC 5827), support for android-style opportunistic suspend, btrfs I/O failure statistics, and SCSI over Firewire and USB. Here's the full changelog.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Stepping down from an office server to NAS-only

rawket.scientist writes: I'm a full time lawyer and part time nerd doing most of the IT support for my small (~10 person) firm. We make heavy use of our old Windows Server 2003 machine for networked storage, and we use it as a DNS server (by choice, not necessity), but we don't use it for our e-mail, web hosting, productivity or software licensing. No Sharepoint, no Exchange, etc. Now old faithful is giving signs of giving out, and I'm seriously considering replacing it with a NAS device like the Synology DS1512+ or Dell PowerVault NX200. Am I penny-wise but pound foolish here? And is it overambitious for someone who's only dabbled in networking 101 to think of setting up a satisfactory, secure VPN or FTP server on one of these? We've had outside consultants and support in the past, but I always get the first "why is it doing this" call, and I like to have the answer, especially if I was the one who recommended the hardware.

Submission + - No More Free Conference Calls (ieee.org)

kgeiger writes: The FCC is changing the call termination tariffs that subsidized rural wireline service and coincidentally free conference calls. Free conference call services had located their dial-in centers in rural areas to scoop up FCC tariffs from its Universal Service Fund. USF monies will go to broadband deployment instead. Be prepared to put more nickels in the box.

Submission + - Storing items in a sealed chest for 25 years (accet87.net) 3

accet87 writes: "We are celebrating the Silver Jubilee of our graduation next month and have come up with an idea where we will build an air-tight chest in which each of us will deposit something and will open the chest only on our Golden Jubilee, i,e, after another 25 years. I want to understand what kind of items can be safely stored for 25 years and what kind of precautions are required to be taken. I am sure things like paper, non ferrous metallic objects, wood etc will hold good.
What about data storage elecronically? I dont think CD/DVD etc will be usable. Even if the data is retained, reading it in 2037 may be a challenge."

Programming

Submission + - HTML5 Splits Into Two Standards (i-programmer.info) 2

mikejuk writes: Until now the two standards bodies WHATWG and W3C working on HTML5 have cooperated. An announcement by WHATWG makes it clear that this is no longer true. WHATWG is going to work on a living standard for HTML which will continue to evolve as more technologies are added. WC3 is going the traditional and much more time consuming route of creating a traditional standard which WHATWG refers to as a "snapshot" of their living standard. Of course now being free of WC3's slower methods WHATWG can accelerate the pace of introducing new technologies to HTML5.
What ever happens the future has just become more complicated — now you have to ask yourself which HTML5?

Mozilla

Submission + - Mozilla Outs Desktop version of Firefox OS (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Mozilla has released a desktop version of its Firefox OS allowing developers to have a sneak peak the OS before it is officially made available on phones. Mozilla has ensured that it gets the highest audience for the Firefox OS and for that it has released the builds for all three major desktop operating systems: Mac, Windows, and Linux. Mozilla's Tony Chung wrote in a blog post, "If you're a web developer, you can use these builds to create and test your webApp against." Gaia/Hacking has the setup instructions. You would need a Gaia profile to launch the build otherwise you might encounter a black screen. Further information is available in Chung's blog post.
Science

Submission + - M-Carbon: 50yro mystery solved (yale.edu) 1

slew writes: Unlike its more famous carbon cousins: diamonds and fullerenes, you've probably never heard of M-Carbon, but this form of compressed graphite which is as hard as diamonds has baffled researcher for half a century. Over the past few years, many theoretical computations have suggested at least a dozen different crystal structures for this phase of carbon, but new experiments showed that only one crystal structure fits the data: M-carbon.
Android

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: scripting on smartphones? 1

An anonymous reader writes: I am choosing a smartphone for work, moving up from a long history of just-a-phone phones. This coincides with moving into an environment where I will have a desktop machine in my office, rather using my laptop — so I'll VPN in from home, and am looking forward to not trucking my laptop around everywhere. BUT ... this means I now won't have my laptop all the time. I have gotten used to scripting various little things that make my life easier, and would like to carry that over to the phone. For example, periodically check that a certain machine is online and backing things up the way it is supposed to; if the lab monitoring system sends me an email that the -80 freezer is up to -50, play a sound and run the vibrate system in a specific, arbitrarily chosen pattern; when I press this button, record an MP3, when I release it prep an email with it attached, that sort of thing. I assume this limits me to Android?

Other features I'm looking for are:
*Screen big enough to read & reply to emails, also skim through pdf files looking for a key point — I don't want an ereader, but I'll often be in a seminar and want to look something up quickly.
*Ability to use WiFi instead of data plan, and smart enough to use it when one of my preferred networks is available without me telling it to.
*can tether my laptop if needed via either wifi or bluetooth
*Can fit in a reasonable size mens pants pocket, and is robust enough that the screen won't crack when I sit down (had an iPaq do this once). I am open to using a holster, but I worry about snagging on things and also exposure to the elements when biking to work.
*decent battery life
*GPS would be nice while travelling on conferences but not essential, ditto a decent camera
*full on web browser that can handle things like TiddlyWiki would be very useful as well

Does such a beast exist? Has anyone used one and if so what do you think? Bonus points if you know if I can use it with Rogers (Canadian wireless provider used by my workplace).
Google

Submission + - Google has Built the Largest URL Database for Pirated Content (techpp.com)

SmartAboutThings writes: "Google’s black-list database, which by the way, also gives users that are not so tech-savvy access to millions of direct links containing even movies or images of games. Although Google indexes vast percentages of the whole web, now it isn't that hard for someone to find a way of downloading pirated music and other samples of this kind""
Your Rights Online

Submission + - FBI Wants a Database of Your Tattoos (blogspot.ca) 2

quantr writes: ""The FBI is consulting local police and vendors about technology currently in use that can spot crooks and terrorists by interpreting the symbolism of their tattoos, according to government documents.
The inquiry follows work already underway at the bureau and Homeland Security Department to add iris and facial recognition services to their respective fingerprint databases.""

Google

Submission + - Google Says Some Apple Inventions Are So Great They Ought to Be Shared (allthingsd.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: In attempting to fend off Apple’s suit against Motorola Mobility and advancing its own patent litigation against Apple, Google, which is facing a lot of regulatory scrutiny in the U.S. and abroad over what some allege is abuse of standard essential patents, has been arguing that proprietary non-standardized technologies that become ubiquitous due to their popularity with consumers should be considered de facto standards.
Android

Submission + - Gooseberry Launches Android-based Raspberry Pi Rival (tomshardware.com)

masternerdguy writes: "

The manufacturer claims that the Gooseberry is "roughly 3 x more powerful in processing power", and twice the RAM (512 MB) than the Raspberry Pi. The Gooseberry does not come with analog video and lacks a LAN port, but supports Wi-Fi. At this time, the board only supports Android 4 ICS and Ubuntu without graphics acceleration. However, Gooseberry is offering premade images for Ubuntu. Support for Arch Linux is "expected in the future".

"

Network

Submission + - Europe Gets Pay-As-You-Go Satellite Broadband (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Europe is set to get pay-as-you-go high speed satellite broadband from Avanti's Ka-band HYLAS1 satellite in the 26.5 — 40GHz range. Avanti says satellite broadband services have improved massively including a far better uplink than used to be available, though the round-trip latency can't be improved much."

Comment charge for launch ! = cost for launch (Score 1) 102

Some people are thinking that the advertised cost of 10m per 225kg means that his costs are the same as Pegasus. They do not realize that branson would not start in the market at his lowest profitable point. If market price is 20k per kg, but I can do it for 5k, I'll just take the extra profit until the market catches up!

Comment Re:Two things holding up asteroid tracking (Score 1) 279

I would think orbital mechanics plays a part that eliminates markovian analysis. ( ie, large object breaks up into smaller pieces, which stay largely in the same orbital path, hence the perseid's meteor showers :)
Haley's comet as a predictable 75 year orbit, why wouldnt there be stuff with 100, 500, 1000, 10000 year orbits that cross our path ?

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