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Linux

Submission + - Humble Indie Bundle 7 Will Be Worst Humble Bundle Ever For Linux (thepowerbase.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Those that are feeling a little miffed by the latest Humble THQ Bundle are probably anxiously awaiting the promised Humble Indie Bundle 7. Bundle number 7 is currently being promised on the Humble Bundle homepage to those users that are not bashful with their email addresses. While no communication has been sent by the Humble Gang yet, there are a few details available.

While browsing the infamous CDR database, we stumbled across a listing for Humble Indie Bundle 7 and Humble Indie Bundle 7: Beat The Average. So how could a Humble Indie Bundle possibly be disappointing, or even worst Humble Bundle ever? So far, they are no linux native games. In addition to that, there are no games making their debut with this bundle. Faithful purchasers of past bundles likely already own all of these games.

Submission + - Sinclair ZX Spectrum FAILS latest radio noise rules SHOCK (theregister.co.uk)

wisewellies writes: Ben clearly has way too much spare time on his hands, but he decided to see just how well an antiquated ZX Spectrum would hold up to modern EMC requirements. His blog is a good read if you're looking for something to do while pretending to work!

From the blog: 'This year is the 30th anniversary of one of my favourite inventions of all time, the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. A few weeks ago, I finally bought one: a non-working one on eBay that I nursed back to health. Fortunately there was very little wrong with it. Unfortunately it’s a 16K model, and a fairly early one at that, which won’t run much software in its native state. This probably accounts for its unusually pristine condition.

We took half an hour in the chamber to perform an approximate series of EN55022 measurements, to check its radiated emissions against today’s standard. The question is, what have we learned as an industry since 1982? Does a 30-year-old computer, that embodies Sinclair’s mastery of cost-engineering and elegant design like nothing else, pass modern legislation that would render it saleable?'

Mars

Submission + - The weirdest, wackiest and coolest sci/tech stories of 2012 (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "As we take our annual look at the year in the cool and the wacky we find a ton of high-tech goodness, from the 300,000 virtual Android-based device network being constructed by the Sandia National Laboratory to the Kansas City program that looks to give interested entrepreneurial-types free room and board to access Google's ultra-fast fiber network. There were major wacky stories as well of course. Take a look."
Wireless Networking

Submission + - FreedomPop Home Internet Arrives in 2013: Apocalypse for Existing Broadband Prov (broadbandconvergent.com)

broadbandconvergent writes: "Skype was a tremendously disruptive product, leveraging peer-to-peer technology to carry voice, it continues to be an incredibly powerful force in disruption of voice applications. Skype has changed the way people see voice apps in how it integrates persistent chat and messaging with video and other services. Skype had 663 million registered users as of EOY 2010, it’s likely even bigger than that now.
Think about it 663 million registered users in 2010–if you factor in some growth over the past few years, that makes Skype as big as the largest carrier in the world"

Earth

Submission + - Scientists Say Life on Land May Not Have Evolved From the Sea 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Conventional wisdom has it that complex life evolved in the sea and then crawled up onto land but NPR reports that a provocative new study published in Nature suggests that the earliest large life forms may have appeared on land long before the oceans filled with creatures that swam and crawled and burrowed in the mud. Paleontologists have found fossil evidence for a scattering of animals called Ediacarans that predate the Cambrian explosion, about 530 million years ago when complex life suddenly burst forth and filled the seas with a panoply of life forms. Many scientists have assumed Ediacarans were predecessors of jellyfish, worms and other invertebrates but palaeontologist Greg Retallack has been building the case that Ediacarans weren't in fact animals, but actually more like fungi or lichens and that Ediacarans weren't even living in the sea, as everyone has assumed. "What I'm saying for the Ediacaran is that the big [life] forms were on land and life was actually quite a bit simpler in the ocean," says Retallack adding that his new theory lends credence to the idea that life actually evolved on land and then moved into the sea. Paul Knauth at Arizona State University has been pondering this same possibility. "I don't have any problem with early evolution being primarily on land," says Knauth. "I think you can make a pretty good argument for that, and that it came into the sea later. It's kind of a radical idea, but the fact is we don't know." Knauth says it could help explain why the Cambrian explosion appears to be so rapid. It's possible these many life forms gradually evolved on the land and then made a quick dash to the sea. "That means that the Earth was not a barren land surface until about 500 million years ago, as a lot of people have speculated.""

Submission + - Ban on loud TV commercials takes effect today (networkworld.com) 1

netbuzz writes: "A new law banning broadcasters from delivering TV commercials at a higher volume takes effect today at the end of a yearlong implementation period. Called the CALM Act, or Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation Act, the law does provide for violators to be fined. TV commercials that crank up the volume have been the No. 1 complaint logged with the FCC over the last 10 years."

Submission + - Slashdot and Hacker News raise $43,200 for the FreeBSD Foundation in three days! (blogspot.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The FreeBSD Foundation has posted blog article article talking about the remarkable surge in donations they've received in the last three days following a recent Slashdot article reporting on weak fundraising this year. Deb Goodkin reports that the FreeBSD Foundation, as with many non-profits, receives more than 50% of its annual funds at the end of the US tax year, but that the Foundation has never seen this rate of donations before, and will hit a new record for unique donors this year. She comments that it was Slashdot readers that made the difference! She does, however, appeal for further donations noting that they have a long way to go on their full goal.
Google

Submission + - Belgian news publishers settle copyright dispute with Google (itworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Belgian French-language news publishers settled a copyright dispute with Google, agreeing to promote each others services while Google will pay all legal fees.

Google will for example drive traffic to news websites via AdWords campaigns and in return, publishers will place ads for Google in their media. "In addition to this partnership, publishers can, on a voluntary basis, re-enter Google News," the parties said.

The publishers sued Google in April 2006 for allegedly violating their copyrights by displaying news snippets in Google News and linking to cached copies of pages in Google search. By republishing part of the articles without paying, Google profited unfairly, the publishers said.

Several Belgian courts ruled in favor of the publishers, and last year, the search giant was ordered to remove all content created by the papers from its websites. Recently, the case was submitted to the Belgian Supreme Court, and now the parties have reached an agreement.

Science

Submission + - Did life on land emerge over 65 million years earlier than was thought? (nature.com)

ananyo writes: "A controversial paper published in Nature argues that enigmatic fossils regarded as ancient sea creatures were actually land-dwelling lichen. If true, that would suggest life on land began 65 million years earlier than researchers now estimate.
The nature of fossils from the Ediacaran period, some 635 million–542 million years ago, has been fiercely debated by palaeontologists. But where others envisage Ediacaran sea beds crawling with archaic animals, Gregory Retallack, a geologist at the University of Oregon in Eugene sees these sites in southern Australia as dry, terrestrial landscapes dotted with lichens. He proposes that rock in the Ediacara Member in South Australia — where palaeontologist Reginald Sprigg first discovered Ediacaran fossils in 1947 — represents ancient soils, and presents new geological data. Among other lines of evidence, Retallack argues that the rock’s red colour and weathering pattern indicate that the deposits were formed in terrestrial — not marine — environments (abstract). Others strongly disagree."

Technology

Submission + - GE develops quiet, slim piezoelectric cooler for your next ultraslim tablet. (cnet.com)

postermmxvicom writes: In just a couple of years, your next ultra portable might be sporting GE's new dual-piezoelectric cooling jets. These new cooling devices, called DCJs, are much slimmer than current coolers and since they lack fans, they are also quieter. Here is a demo of the technology implemented in an Ultrabook.

Submission + - Nginx-rtmp-module makes nginx a high-performance media streaming server (github.com) 1

arut writes: "Nginx is well-known for its great performance and extensibility. A new nginx-rtmp-module turns your nginx into a media streaming server. It provides support for Adobe RTMP protocol as well as Apple HLS for streaming video to mobile devices. Making use of nginx asynchronous single-threaded architecture it outperforms many streaming servers available out there built on top of multi-threaded technology. It can stream up to 2Gbps per CPU core with thousands of connected clients. Features supported are live streaming, video-on-demand, seamless ffmpeg integration for transcoding, recording, HTTP notifications for handling events and many more. The module is distributed under BSD-license."

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