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Comment easiest way... (Score 1) 298

Easiest way is to get into the hosting industry for somewhat low pay (~$40k in the Chicago area). You get experience and exposure to other technologies and you can always get certs in the meantime. You may have to start off doing Level 1 Tech Support over the phone or DC stuff, rebooting and making cat5 cables to start, but this is a very common gateway to the IT industry.
Facebook

Submission + - The Long Arm of the Tweet (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "According to a recent Lexis-Nexis survey of 1200 law enforcement personnel, 80% use social media to conduct investigations. And it's easy to see why: While it helps that you share 'enormously detailed information' online, it's your social network that really does the talking, says Lee Altschuler, a Federal defense attorney. 'Cops will figure out who the associates of the suspect are,' Altschuler explained. 'The police will then friend or connect to the associates, working to gain their trust, and then will eventually friend the target directly, or be able to glean information about the target through the associates.' Of course, this is pretty much the same action they've always taken in the offline world, it's just far more efficient on social media (plus, there's the aforementioned willingness to share information online)."

Submission + - ISPs Throttling BitTorrent Traffic, Study Finds (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: A new report by an open source internet measurement platform, Measurement Lab, sheds light onto throttling of and restriction on BitTorrent traffic by ISPs (Internet Service Provider) across the globe. The report by Measurement Lab reveals that hundreds of ISPs across the globe are involved into throttling of peer-to-peer traffic through and specifically BitTorrent traffic. The Glasnost application run by the platform helps in detecting whether ISPs shape traffic and tests can be carried out to check whether the throttling or blocking is carried out “on email, HTTP or SSH transfer, Flash video, and P2P apps including BitTorrent, eMule and Gnutella”. Going by country, United States has actually seen a drop in throttling compared to what it was back in 2010. Throttling in US is worst for Cox at 6 per cent and best for Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and others at around 3 per cent. United Kingdom is seeing a rise in traffic shaping and BT is the worst with 65 per cent. Virgin Media throttles around 22 per cent of the traffic while the least is O2 at 2 per cent. More figures can be found here.
User Journal

Journal Journal: Test

Test post.

Facebook

Submission + - Facebook Prepares for release of iPad App (techplz.com)

An anonymous reader writes: News is spreading quickly around the web that Facebook is preparing to release an official iPad app.

According to the New York Times, unnamed sources have reported that Facebook will be releasing the iPad app in coming weeks. The new app will be free for users and has been crafted to work specially with the iPad.

The release of the iPad app is significantly delayed compared with the release of the iPhone Facebook app. The iPhone version was available upon the opening of the Apple App Store back in 2008.

The app will reportedly allow users to snap pictures using the iPad’s camera. Facebook users will also be able to upload pictures and videos directly from the tablet device. The same report also noted that the production of the iPad Facebook app has taken about a year. The app is now apparently in its final testing stages before the major release.

The new app could certainly benefit both Facebook and Apple. Facebook recently announced that the social network is nearing 700 million global users. A propitious Facebook app for the iPad could sway customers from purchasing Google’s Android tablets. The new iPad app could benefit Facebook by increasing user interaction on the social network. Apple announced earlier this month that the company had reached a new milestone with 25 million iPads sold.

Increased pageviews on Facebook would fundamentally amplify the social networks revenue through advertisements.

There are reportedly plans to improve Facebook’s normal web-browsing functionality on the iPad. The improvement are not meant to directly compete with the new app, but rather to improve user-experience all around.

Crime

Submission + - Online poker legalization bill coming next week (thehill.com)

GovTechGuy writes: Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) could introduce his bill to legalize online poker as soon as next week. The bill would legalize the game in all 50 states but sites could only be set up in states where gambling is already legal, so they can be licensed through existing gaming commissions. States could choose to opt-out of the law and ban online poker by referendum or a vote of the state legislature. The bill would also create a federal regulatory body to oversee the game.
Security

Submission + - After 7 years, MyDoom worm is still spreading (sophos.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at Sophos have revealed that the MyDoom worm, which spread via email and launched denial-of-service attacks against websites belonging to SCO and Microsoft, is still spreading on the internet after more than 7 years in existence.

The firm suggests tongue-in-cheek, that it would be nice if computer users updated their anti-virus software /at least/ once every 5 years to combat the malware threat.

Submission + - Microsoft, Google, Twitter debate HTML5 (networkworld.com)

jbrodkin writes: "The annual USENIX conference featured an all-star lineup of engineers from Microsoft, Google, Twitter and Flipboard debating whether HTML5 is the "holy grail" for building next-generation Web applications, and whether mobile developers should build websites or apps. The promise of HTML5 is "write once, run everywhere," but the panelists did not agree on whether the technology is good enough to make browser applications feel "native." There was general agreement that HTML5 is lacking on mobile devices, and that for better or worse the move toward apps instead of websites is being driven less by technology than the imperative to make money."
IBM

Submission + - IBM Did Not Invent the Personal Computer

theodp writes: As IBM gives itself a self-congratulatory pat on the back as it celebrates its 100th anniversary, Robert X. Cringely wants to set the record straight: 'IBM didn't invent the personal computer', writes Cringely, 'but they don't know that.' Claiming to have done so, he adds, soils the legacy of Ed Roberts and pisses off all real geeks in the process. Throwing Big Blue a bone, Cringely is willing to give IBM credit for 'having helped automate the Third Reich'.

Comment confessions of a former agoraphobic (Score 1) 347

I still suffer from anxiety issues. It will always be with me. In a sick twist of fate I got into IT in a round about way. At 16 I became a complete and total agoraphobic.. couldn't leave the driveway or I'd get severe chest pains, pins and needles from head to toe, I really thought I was dying of a heart attack. I spent the next three years bottled up inside as a recluse and did the best I could with my time.. read and learned, programmed, unix.. linux.. it was all I had. I eventually learned to function and go out like anyone else. 17 years later and I am living in the third largest city in North America, I take trains. I fly for business and pleasure. I still have anxiety issues though. I carry some prescription xanax in the event of a bad one but usually I go down the street and have a beer at the pub which makes everything quite alright. The last thing I worry about is messing something up at work. If I worried about that I would not be able to do an effective job.

Comment Been there, done that (Score 1) 486

I worked at an ISP in the midwest and we started doing this as early as late 2001/early 2002. Yes, customers were pissed and we lost some because of it. But as a result we saved alot more time and money then having to deal with abuse complaints, FBI subpoenas, saturated networks, etc. It is not the ISP's responsibility to protect the customer but it is their responsibility to protect their network. 'If you don't like you can blow me' should be the attitude of the network administrator.

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