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Comment Solution. (Score 1) 897

The main argument of TFA is that FF3's warning about self signed certs is egregious.

There is not an issue about warning users; users need to be warned.

What is needed is individual warnings in a drop-down bar for individual problems with certificate issues:

*(picture of green 1's and 0's alongside a red face with a line through it) This certificate is self signed; It may not be trustworthy for identification purposes, you should only trust it for data encryption purposes.

*(picture of a green face alongside a red clock with a line through it) This certificate is out of date; it expired YYYY MM DD HH MM SS ago.

*Trusted case: (picture of a green face) This certificate identifies XYZ.com as trusted by CERTCORP.com. Your data is encrypted.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - I hope the GetTheFacts add pops up! 1

An anonymous reader writes: from MicroSofts site "The Infolect® application, which went into production in September 20"......."In the past six years, there have been no production outages at the London Stock Exchange, and the new systems running on Microsoft technologies are critical to maintaining this 100 per cent reliability record."
http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/casestudy.aspx?casestudyid=200042

and a 2 years later
"London Stock Exchange blames outage on Infolect"

http://www.cio.co.uk/concern/security/news/index.cfm?articleid=2248&pagtype=allchantopdate
United States

Submission + - Pimps and Ferrets: Copyright & the 19th centur (ohiolink.edu)

Eric Anderson writes: "This link is to my dissertation manuscript about popular ideas about copyright during the nineteenth century US.

Although generally forgotten today, the nineteenth century US was absolutely rife with copyright-related controversy and excitement, including international squabbling, celebrity grandstanding, new technology, corporate exploitation, and ferocious arguments about piracy, reprinting, and the effects of copyright law.

Then, as now, copyright was very important to a small group of people (e.g. authors and publishers), and slightly important to larger groups (e.g. consumers and readers). However, these various larger groups did have definite ideas about copyright, its function, and its purpose. Many of these ideas are relevant today.

A book (if there is one) is probably years away. In the meantime, the dissertation itself is freely distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 license.

Pimps and Ferrets: Copyright and Culture in the United States, 1831-1891 (page has link to 1.8M, 231-page PDF) http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1193529137"

XBox (Games)

Submission + - Microsoft confirms Xbox 360 Family Timer (gamespot.com) 1

nexidus writes: Currently, all three current-generation consoles have parental controls. Like similar features on televisions and DVD players, the tools for the Wii, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3 let parents lock out games of a certain rating. Thus, a 35-year-old man could own Gears of War without worrying about his 5-year-old son accidentally playing it.

This morning, Microsoft upped the parental-control ante by officially announcing the long-rumored Family Timer feature for its Xbox 360 console. Based on a similar feature in the Windows Vista operating system, the feature lets parents limit the amount of time a child plays on a daily or weekly basis. Once a child nears the maximum playtime, a reminder will appear on the console to warn the player to save the game soon.

The Family Timer option will be a download from Xbox Live and will be available in December. Robbie Bach, president of Microsoft's Entertainment & Devices Division, unveiled it at a Washington, DC event this morning. The event was to promote PACT, "a family contract" being promoted by the Parent Teacher Association as a way "to foster family discussion about screen-time guidelines." The PACT contract is available for download on the newly revamped family games section of Xbox.com.

It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Australian Labour Party PM Candidate Eats Ear Wax (telegraph.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: YouTube has done it again. This weeks TOP PICK is of Australian PM hopeful, Kevin Rudd, and his nasty earwax eating habit. You may not have heard this in the mainstream press. This is because Rudd is a liberal, going against a conservative party which has backed Bush. Of course, if this video was of Bush, it would probably be part of the 10TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION right now... Enjoy.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Officials Accidently Crash RC Boat into Wrong Boat

coastal984 writes: NBC12 in Richmond, Virginia recently reported how officials from the Department of Game & Inland Fisheries, in a first-ever test of crashing two full-sized boats into each other, accidently hit the wrong boat — instead of the two remotely controlled vessels colliding, they missed, and one veered off and hit a manned chase boat. From the article: "At first the two [remote control] boats were heading straight at each other. Then something went wrong." No people were hurt, but a 225 horsepower engine is a new reef for the fishies at the bottom of the James River. The article has video showing the crash from two different angles.
The Courts

Submission + - Seagate to pay for inaccurate kilobyte (zdnet.co.uk) 2

Christopher Blanc writes: "Seagate Technology, the world's largest hard-drive maker, is offering customers a five percent refund on drives bought during the last six years following a lawsuit over the definition of a "gigabyte". As an alternative, customers can choose to receive free backup software.

Four people sued the company, saying they expected its drives to offer greater capacity than that actually provided. Seagate manufactures its drives based on powers of ten, with 1KB equalling 1,000 bytes. The claimants argued that 1KB of storage should compromise 1,024 bytes.

http://news.zdnet.co.uk/hardware/0,1000000091,39290393,00.htm"

Programming

Submission + - Intro to Reverse Engineering - Part 2 (ethicalhacker.net)

ddonzal writes: "In Part 1, Intro to Reverse Engineering — No Assembly Required, we extended the series of coding articles for non-programmers with an area of high interest in the infosec community. We're proud to be able to bring you the highly anticipated follow-up complete with screen shots, sample code and applications. This one is long and detailed, so strap yourselves in for some great educational content. This paper is designed to outline some essential reverse engineering concepts, tools and techniques — primarily, debuggers and using the debugging process to reverse engineer application functions and algorithms. It is assumed you have knowledge of basic assembly and C programming. This tutorial does not necessarily have to be read in order (although it is strongly advised), as some sections do not contain information that directly relates to subsequent sections. http://www.ethicalhacker.net/content/view/165/2/"
The Courts

Submission + - Mom Sues Music Company Over Baby Video Removal 8

penguin_dance writes: A Pennsylvania mom is fighting back, suing Universal Music Publishing Group for having a home movie taken down off of YouTube. The movie, featuring her 18-month old bouncing to Prince's song, "Let's Go Crazy," was cited for removal by the Group for copyright infringement. Mom Stephanie Lenz was first afraid they'd come after her — then she got angry. She got YouTube to put the video back up and now she's enlisted the help of Electronic Frontier Foundation and filed a civil lawsuit.

"I thought even though I didn't do anything wrong that they might want to file some kind of suit against me, take my house, come after me. And I didn't like feeling afraid," she continued. "I didn't like feeling that I could get in trouble for something as simple as posting a home video for my friends and family to see."
Windows

Submission + - The money machine that is Microsoft

westlake writes: "Microsoft's Q1 financials are enough to drive a Geek into cardiac arrest. Sales up 27%. Earnings per share up 29%. Halo grossing $300 million in its first week. Vista and Office 2007 doing very, very, well and Microsoft's server products not far behind. MSN and Live! losing money as usual, but nothing to lose sleep over. Microsoft Soars 11% After Blowout Q1 On Vista Demand"

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