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Comment Re:A global remote kill switch in our computers (Score 5, Interesting) 399

I don't know what Intel is putting into those chips, but I am highly doubtful it is the way the article states it.

Chip real estate is expensive. So Intel is going to put a complete 3G module on the CPU and use it only for this feature? And to top it off, it has some kinda of separate battery, cause you know, it works when the chip is off? Nonsense.

This is probably some feature that gets build into the AMT support of some chipsets, maybe on Laptops that have a 3G connection already.But the way they are describing this? I call BS on that.

Comment Just idle speculation (Score 5, Informative) 286

It's funny how quick idle speculation turns into news. Apparently it all started with this blog post.

He's now updated his post with a tweet from someone at Nasa that the press conference is not about proof of life:

Comment Golf Diesel (Score 1, Insightful) 576

I wonder if a real-life-real-drivers 70 mpg car is what will actually arrive, or if such promises will dissolve like Chevy's promises about the Volt did.

I used to drive an 85 VW Golf Diesel, that Car reliably got (actually got, under real world driving conditions) 47 mpg (5l/100km). That's a car that was build 25 years ago. Volkswagen also sold the Lupo 3L which got 78 miles per US gallon or 94 miles per Imperial gallon

It boggles my mind that 25 years later most cars I can buy in the US get half of what my 25 year old car got. If that. It also means that getting 70 shouldn't be impossible. Thats 3.3l/100km, and it's been done.

Comment Re:Delicious (Score 1) 225

delicious.com solved this for me a long time ago.

What did Xmarks do that delicious does not?

I'm not familiar with the details of delicious.com, but Xmarks syncs your bookmarks, history, open tabs and passwords across multiple browsers. I find the password sync in particular to be invaluable, but you can disable each of the four options depending on your preference. I'll miss them.

Comment Copy and paste summary (Score 4, Informative) 131

The Cri-cri (short for cricket) is the smallest twin-engined manned aircraft in the world, designed in the early 1970s by French aeronautical engineer Michel Colomban, the Cri-cri aircraft is the world's smallest twin-engine .

At first I thought the writer of the summary had simply messed up when editing and repeated the same thing twice. But when you check wikipedia, it has the same mistake, even down to the space in front of the period: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Colomban_Cri-cri&oldid=383417426

At least when you copy and paste verbatim from wikipedia, read the sentence and see if it makes sense.

Comment Re:Ok, but (Score 2, Interesting) 1138

"technical training or two-year schools, which have been embraced in Europe for decades."

Telling Americans to do something because Europe's been doing it is a lot like telling a 5-year-old not to go near the cookie jar.

They are also omitting the fact that Europe has meaningful alternatives to universities, with apprenticeships in the dual education system. I've often felt that that's whats lacking in the US.

Comment Four megawatts of power for up to eight hours? (Score 1) 301

The house-sized battery can hold four megawatts of power for up to eight hours.

I wasn't sure what that was supposed to mean. Does the battery discharge in 8 hours if you don't use the energy?

The original NPR article http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125561502 leads me to think they are saying that the consumption of the town is 4MW and the battery can feed it for 8 hours, so it holds 32MW (or less, since the 4MW is the peak load).

On an unrelated note, why does the inhabitat article have four links, which all go to the same popsci article? Does the author get paid by the link?

Comment Re:Link (Score 4, Insightful) 273

A lot of these speed tests always compare javascript performance, which I have to say matters less for me on a day to day usage than other things.

At the end of the article (10 pages later), they do break it out into categories. The winner of the 'page load' category is: Firefox.

I care about other things as well, startup times for example (won by Opera), but if I had to pick one most important category for me, it's page load times. YMMV, obviously.

Shortcut to summary: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/firefox-chrome-opera,2558-10.html

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