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Comment Re:Ardour (Score 1) 223

I used to be a Logic user and I find that Pro-tools produced music is too sterile, formulaic and doesn't excite me sonically. I use Ardour to record several projects for a variety of acoustic control decisions.

All DAWs can be used as a simple tape deck. Just because Pro Tools gives you certain tools and possibilities doesn't mean you have to use them. The notion that music recorded and mixed in Pro Tools has to have a certain "sound" shows that you still have a bit to learn about the"production process from the instrument all the way to the final mastering stage".

I'd rather have a program like Reaper, which gives me options to go as simple or as complex as I want, than a program like Ardour, that gets in my way and makes things more difficult because the designers didn't have a clear vision of workflow in audio.

If I had all the time in the world and was a Linux zealot, I'd happily use Ardour (as long as I'd never seen what a professional DAW can do). As I said, if all I was doing was being a basement hobbyist Jonathan Coulton, then Ardour would be totally fine. As long as you didn't expect to use professional audio interfaces. Try to use Ardour with an Apollo interface

If your goal is to make music using only OSS software (for some reason), then Ardour is what you want. But Reaper works perfectly well in Wine and is a real DAW. If you want to step up to making music more than a hobby, you'll want to find something better.

Seriously, friend, I've been where you are. Keep an open mind about this. However, if you are married to the idea of Ardour, I'd suggest looking at a product called the Harrison Mixbus. It's based on Ardour if I remember correctly and it's far more refined. When I used Ardour, I found it to make life and the sound a lot better.

Comment Re:Wrong! (Score 1) 640

Jefferson was an expert on capitalism?

Not capitalism, corporatism.

In fact here's one of his quotes on the subject:

âoeI hope we shall crush⦠in its birth the aristocracy of our moneyed corporations, which dare already to challenge our government to a trial of strength and bid defiance to the laws of our country."

And I'll bet you didn't know that Jefferson and Madison wanted the Bill of Rights to contain an 11th Amendment.

"The amendment would have made it illegal for corporations to own other corporations, or to give money to politicians, or to otherwise try to influence elections. Corporations would be chartered by the states for the primary purpose of âoeserving the public good.â Corporations would possess the legal status not of natural persons but rather of âoeartificial persons.â

It sounds like Jefferson and Madison (the Father of Conservativism) had a pretty damn good idea of what was coming. But even then, there were large and powerful corporations who worked to defeat the vision that Jefferson and Madison had to make government a counterbalance to corporate power.

Comment Voted down (Score 1) 1

an invasive species native to South America has been threatening biological diversity in the ear which can have lasting consequences on the ecosystem

Threatening biological diversity in the ear? Huh? Plus, when I tried to go to your link it wanted a username and password. Fix the summary, find a better link, and resubmit.

Comment Re:Would have walked away? (Score 2) 73

do they ground military aircraft like they do commercial ones?

Yes, when I was in the USAF they often grounded whole fleets. The C5As were out of service for a few months after a piece of equipment used to service the tail fell over and killed a guy. Unlike civilian planes, when military planes get grounded it seldom makes the news.

Submission + - Even the Author of the Patriot Act Is Trying to Stop the NSA (vice.com)

Daniel_Stuckey writes: Republican Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner will introduce an anti-NSA bill tomorrow in the House, and if it makes its winding way to becoming law, it will be a big step towards curtailing the NSA's bulk metadata collection. Wisconsin Rep. Sensenbrenner, along with 60 co-sponsors, aims to amend one section of the Patriot Act, Section 215, in a bill known as the United and Strengthening America by Fulfilling Rights and Ending Eavesdropping, Dragnet Collection, and Online Monitoring Act—also known by its less-clunky acronym version, the USA Freedom Act.

Comment Re:Enough already... (Score 1) 215

Correction... WE know all about the intercepts now. But the mass audience the Guardian wants to reach isn't as well informed.

What that puerile bitch Snookie is up to (and like-minded garbage) is sadly much more important to them.

The minority who try their best to be aware don't deserve to reap what the majority have sown.

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