Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Parent speaks the truth (Score 5, Informative) 300

Yup. MS said so themselves.

Xbox One built for ads from the ground up

So what about the future of advertising on the Xbox One? “It’s going to be an exciting transition though because the 360 console wasn’t built with advertising in mind, it was more of an afterthought, so we’ve had to adapt to the technology and how we work to fit them in to the console,” said Technical Account Manager for Xbox LIVE Advertising, “whereas this new one is going to have advertising in mind. So a lot of the limitations that we have now, hopefully the release of the boundaries will widened so the opportunities will be a lot greater.”

Submission + - Snowden offered asylum by Venezuelan President (telesurtv.net)

aBaldrich writes: Edward Snowden was offered "humanitarian asylum" by Nicolás Maduro, the president of Venezuela. The country's official news agency reports (oroginal spanish, google translation) that the decision was taken after a meeting of the presidents of Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Suriname, Uruguay and Venezuela.
Maduro denounced an attempt to "colonize" several European Countries, and that he is acting "on behalf of the dignity of the Americas".

Submission + - Can the Slashdot effect save Ed Snowden? 1

NewtonsLaw writes: I read that Iceland has refused asylum and citizenship to whistleblower Ed Snowden.

In response to this, I wrote a very polite, email to the office of the Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson (details on this webpage) expressing my disappointment at the decision and my sympathy for a once-proud nation that seems to have lost its nerve when faced with the might of the USA.

If anyone else wants to do the same then perhaps it's not too late to alert the Icelandic government to the fact that they could win millions of new friends from all over the world if they were to show their courage and bravery by helping Snowden, as they have with others in the past.

Of course any such communication needs to be polite, concise and focused on showing Iceland that the internet community supports Ed Snowden and those who are prepared to help him.

Maybe the Slashdot community can help. Why not spend a few quick minutes firing off an email so we can find out for sure.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Will the NSA Controversy Drive People to Use Privacy Software? (slashdot.org) 1

Nerval's Lobster writes: As the U.S. government continues to pursue former NSA contractor Edward Snowden for leaking some of the country’s most sensitive intelligence secrets, the debate over federal surveillance seems to have abated somewhat—despite Snowden’s stated wish for his revelations to spark transformative and wide-ranging debate, it doesn’t seem as if anyone’s taking to the streets to protest the NSA’s reported monitoring of Americans’ emails and phone-call metadata. Even so, will the recent revelations about the NSA lead to a spike in demand for sophisticated privacy software, leading to a glut of new apps that vaporize or encrypt data? While there are quite a number of tools already on the market (SpiderOak, Silent Circle, and many more), is their presence enough to get people interested enough to install them? Or do you think the majority of people simply don't care? Despite some polling data that suggests people are concerned about their privacy, software for securing it is just not an exciting topic for most folks, who will rush to download the latest iteration of Instagram or Plants vs. Zombies, but who often throw up their hands and profess ignorance when asked about how they lock down their data.

Submission + - Revelations on the French Big Brother (lemonde.fr)

Wrath0fb0b writes: Days after President François Hollande sternly told the United States to stop spying on its allies, the newspaper Le Monde disclosed on Thursday that France has its own large program of data collection, which sweeps up nearly all the data transmissions, including telephone calls, e-mails and social media activity, that come in and out of France. The report notes that "our email messages, SMS messages, itemised phone bills and connections to FaceBook and Twitter are then stored for years."

For those /.ers that grok Français, you can read the original at Le Monde or the translated version from LM. The NYT also has a writeup on the story.

Submission + - Spying Scandal: EU may sever Ties with American Internet Providers (rt.com) 1

dryriver writes: EU businesses are threatening to terminate relations with American internet providers in response to the National Security Agency surveillance scandal, the European Commission has warned. Neelie Kroes, Vice President of the European Commission, said that US providers of ‘cloud services,’ a technology that permits clients to store data on remote servers, could suffer steep losses if users fear the security of their material is at risk of being compromised. "If businesses or governments think they might be spied on, they will have less reason to trust cloud, and it will be cloud providers who ultimately miss out,” Kroes said. “Why would you pay someone else to hold your commercial or other secrets if you suspect or know they are being shared against your wishes?" The EC vice president then pointed to the “multi-billion euro consequences” facing US internet companies in the wake of the scandal. "It is often American providers that will miss out, because they are often the leaders in cloud services. If European cloud customers cannot trust the United States government, then maybe they won't trust US cloud providers either. If I am right, there are multibillion-euro consequences for American companies. If I were an American cloud provider, I would be quite frustrated with my government right now."

Submission + - New Study: How Copyright Makes Books and Music Disappear (ssrn.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: A new study of books and music for sale on Amazon shows how copyright makes works disappear. The research, available at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2290181 is described in the abstract: "A random sample of new books for sale on Amazon.com shows three times more books initially published in the 1850’s are for sale than new books from the 1950’s. Why? A sample of 2300 new books for sale on Amazon.com is analyzed along with a random sample of 2000 songs available on new DVD’s. Copyright status correlates highly with absence from the Amazon shelf. Second, the availability on YouTube of songs that reached number one on the U.S., French, and Brazilian pop charts from 1930-60 is analyzed in terms of the identity of the uploader, type of upload, number of views, date of upload, and monetization status. An analysis of the data demonstrates that the DMCA safe harbor system as applied to YouTube helps maintain some level of access to old songs by allowing those possessing copies (primarily infringers) to communicate relatively costlessly with copyright owners to satisfy the market of potential listeners.

Comment Do you know what you are talking about even (Score 4, Insightful) 59

I'm pretty sure NASA have heard of this JPL since the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Caltech is a NASA laboratory.

From TFA:

“A commercial lunar lander jointly developed with NASA would capitalize on NASA's previous investments and expertise in lander technologies. It also would stimulate a commercial capability to deliver payloads to the lunar surface reliably and cost-effectively."

So how is reaching out to commercial entities to improve their existing know-how instead of relying ONLY on their own labs "being clueless and pathetic"?

Comment Re:Sure, join us (Score 1) 123

IT would also go a long way to speed up checkin. The number of delays due to Bag-Tag printers malfunctioning is staggering.

How does this compare with the number of delays due to the electronic tags being updated with the wrong information by the passengers? If the tags can be updated by the passengers themselves, it is a virtual certainty that someone somewhere will make a mistake, taking into consideration the complexities of international flights, transit stops, connecting flights, return flights etc etc.

FTA:

The airline recently produced an electronic luggage tag that travelers can update themselves with a smartphone and re-use over and over. The proposed electronic tags will have two small e-ink screens showing the bag's destination and a corresponding barcode with more flight details. Using an app, passengers will be able to wave their smartphone over it and automatically input their destination via NFC.

Submission + - EU parliament supports suspending US data sharing

egladil writes: As seen previously here on slashdot the European Parliament was to vote on 'whether existing data sharing agreements between the two continents should be suspended, following allegations that U.S. intelligence spied on EU citizens.' With the votes now having been cast, the result is 483 in favor of the resolution and 98 against, while 65 abstained.
The resolution in question in part called for the USA 'to suspend and review any laws and surveillance programs that "violate the fundamental right of EU citizens to privacy and data protection," as well as Europe's "sovereignty and jurisdiction."', in part decided that the EU should investigate the surveillance of EU citizens, and finally gave backing to the European Commision in case they should decide to suspend the data sharing deals currently in place with the USA, such as the Passenger Name Record (PNR) and Terrorist Finance Tracking Program (TFTP) agreements.
The question now is whether the EU commision will go through with suspending these deals or not.

Comment Nuremberg Principle IV (Score 2) 214

I refer you to the Nuremberg Principle IV

Principle IV states: "The fact that a person acted pursuant to order of his Government or of a superior does not relieve him from responsibility under international law, provided a moral choice was in fact possible to him".

This principle could be paraphrased as follows: "It is not an acceptable excuse to say 'I was just following my superior's orders'".

There is always a choice not to follow. One could take the courageous example of acting attorney general James Comey, FBI director Robert Mueller and others in the Bush era :-

Nine years ago, top officials in the Justice Department and FBI threatened to resign over then-President George W. Bush's sweeping domestic surveillance policy, which they believed to be illegal. As the Washington Post reports, acting attorney general James Comey, FBI director Robert Mueller, and top leadership in the Justice Department began drafting resignation letters in March of 2004, after the National Security Agency (NSA), at Bush's direction, began collecting metadata on emails and Skype calls sent and placed within the US.

Comey and Goldsmith found the NSA's argument tenuous, and threatened to resign over it. Bush at first pushed forward with the program, even after Comey ordered a halt to it, but ultimately reversed course after Mueller threatened to resign.

Comment He did (Score 1) 214

Excuse me... Did you just try to cop the Nuremburg Defence on behalf of the NSA?

I'm just saying you need to blame the politicos who are responsible.

Ergo, blame the politicos, not the NSA. Perfect application of the Nuremberg Defence.

Superior orders (often known as the Nuremberg defense or lawful orders) is a plea in a court of law that a soldier not be held guilty for actions which were ordered by a superior officer.

This is a legal defense that essentially states that the defendant was "only following orders" ("Befehl ist Befehl", literally "an order is an order") and is therefore not responsible for his or her crimes. Colloquially "Befehl ist Befehl" is known as "orders are orders".

Slashdot Top Deals

Old programmers never die, they just hit account block limit.

Working...