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Comment Flamebait BBC report (Score 1) 409

It safe to assume that its just another flamebait BBC report not to be taken seriously. While the publisher (S Chand) is certainly of some repute in this country, it isn't known if this textbook has actually been adopted by any school.A textbook cannot be formally adopted by any school unless it gets approved by government institutions in charge of secondary education like NCERT or CBSE. This furore might have made sense if this textbook was being actually taught to kids; which isn't the case here.

Submission + - Jose Mujica: The world's 'poorest' president

red crab writes: "BBC News has carried out an article about Jose Mujica, labelled as the world's poorest president

It's a common grumble that politicians' lifestyles are far removed from those of their electorate. Not so in Uruguay. Meet the president — who lives on a ramshackle farm and gives away most of his pay. Mujica donates about 90% of his monthly salary, equivalent to $12,000 (£7,500), to charity. "This is a matter of freedom. If you don't have many possessions then you don't need to work all your life like a slave to sustain them, and therefore you have more time for yourself," he says."
NASA

Submission + - NASA Says Staff Information Was on Stolen Laptop (nytimes.com)

SternisheFan writes: By NICOLE PERLROTH, New York Times:
    NASA told its staff this week that a laptop containing sensitive personal information for a large number of employees and contractors was stolen two weeks ago from a locked vehicle. Although the laptop was password protected, the information had not been encrypted, which could give skilled hackers full access to the contents. In its notice to employees on Tuesday, the agency said:
  "On Oct. 31, 2012, a NASA laptop and official NASA documents issued to a headquarters employee were stolen from the employee’s locked vehicle. The laptop contained records of sensitive personally identifiable information for a large number of NASA employees, contractors and others. Although the laptop was password protected, it did not have whole disk encryption software, which means the information on the laptop could be accessible to unauthorized individuals. We are thoroughly assessing and investigating the incident and taking every possible action to mitigate the risk of harm or inconvenience to affected employees."
    This is not the first time NASA has suffered a serious breach. The agency has long been a target for cybercriminals looking to pilfer sensitive research. In 2004, computers at several NASA sites, including its Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., were breached. And as recently as March, the company reported a breach that was also caused by a stolen laptop. Given its history, it is unclear why the agency has not stepped up its security practices. Beth Dickey, a NASA spokeswoman, said that in this most recent case, the employee’s laptop had been for a security upgrade.
“The laptop was scheduled to receive encryption, as part of an ongoing, agency-wide effort to encrypt whole disks of all NASA computers,” Ms. Dickey said. “This one just hadn’t been done yet.”
    NASA has said it plans to have all of its laptops running whole-disk encryption software by Dec. 21.

Comment Re:Don't negotiate with cyber criminals? (Score 1) 303

..The government is powerless or incompetent to protect you're rights...

Even if the government were competent enough, would you really like the government to protect yourself from a DDoS attack? On one hand you would want government not to police or censor the Internet and on the other you want it to protect you from petty cyber criminals?

Comment Re:I do not know why this appear on Slashdot !! (Score 1) 242

but if Amazon cares about the quality of their marketplace, they ought to be careful about letting any random person scrape a community-created document from the internet and publish it as an ebook.

By that definition, every tech book should be treated as non-original work since the information it conveys to the reader is already available freely on the web, though not consolidated as in a book. I think they (Amazon) need to understand that they are just sellers, not publishers and they need to be least concerned about what experience a user might derive after reading a book purchased by them.

Comment Re:Critical Apps on Linux. (Score 1) 249

I too always thought that this "unification" or interoperability within Microsoft products is their biggest advantage; until recently I tried to saddle a Sharepoint application with IIS, SQL server and Active Directory - It was as painful as OpenLDAP, MIT Kerberos and Samba integration I did a couple of years back.

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