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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 30 declined, 6 accepted (36 total, 16.67% accepted)

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Submission + - The day the Routers died (secret-wg.org)

Raindeer writes: "The RIPE 55 meeting has just concluded. There was much debate on what to do on the imminent depletion of the unallocated IPv4 pool in 2010. We could do nothing or we could create a market place and facilitate transfer of IP-adresses, but it's all a train wreck waiting to happen. This is best shown however by a beautiful song "The day the routers died" also available on Youtube written and performed by Gary Feldman. So please all upgrade to IPv6 soon, or else you will not get 40Gbit/s to your mother."
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - UK conspired with mobile companies on roaming (timesonline.co.uk)

Raindeer writes: "The Times revealed that the UK government actively conspired with phone companies to keep mobile roaming charges high. A Freedom of Information Request revealed that the UK Government were "not happy bunnies", when the European Union wanted to lower charges for mobile roaming in the EU dramatically. Ewan Sutherland, a leading telecoms policy consultant, said: "I hadn't fully appreciated that the Government had gone over to the Dark Side to that extent." Even now the charges are excessively high at 49 eurocent per minute. But the chances that the EU would actually support a simple idea that would promote competition are marginal. Data roaming charges (for Brits) are even more excessive at up to 21USD per Mbyte."
The Internet

Submission + - Should the BBC pay ISP's for iPlayer (blogspot.com)

Raindeer writes: "In the UK debate has broken out about the BBC's iPlayer. Part of it, because it does'tn support open source, but seems to be some evil Micrsoft plot. Another part of it is because of the choice for the Kontiki P2P distribution system, which according to some important industry insiders and bloggers is unfair towards ISP's. In this article I evaluate the arguments in favour of making content providers pay for their bits and show how these are flawed and would stifle innovation."
Google

Submission + - Google Adsense for Open Source and Charity

Raindeer writes: "It would be great if it would be possible to select in Google Adsense that (part of) the revenue will be sent to charity. This way it will become easy to contribute to open source projects or other good causes. This will increase the income of those charities. It will also become possible for accounts that generate little revenue to send the money that is there to a charity. (And yeah, Microsoft and Yahoo can also implement this idea, but unfortunately for them most of the money is at Google at this moment) I hope Slashdot-readers will help me generate more attention for this idea and come up with ideas to get this idea higher up Google's to-do-list. I have blogged about this and written about in my journal and a Dutch site. The origins of this idea lie in me looking at the enormous amount of $8 on my Adsense account (the payout limit is $100) and wondering if there was something better to do with it, instead of waiting 12 years for the first check."
Google

Submission + - Appeal to Google! Use Google Adsense for Good!

Raindeer writes: "I sent the Google Adsense people the following suggestion/feature request; for Google to add an option to allow the pay-out of (a part of) the Adsense revenue of a site directly to a charity. The Google ads on my blog don't generate much income and well, I don't really care about it, they're partially a service to let people find interesting companies and partially a way for me to keep track of statistics (before Google Analytics came around). It's a bit of a long tail idea, where many small sites help generate a big amount of money for charity. I hope some people in the blogosphere help to give this idea some thrust and also encourage Google to allow people to easily let a charity become the beneficiary of the revenue the Google Ads generate."
The Media

Submission + - A photo journalist critisizes Creative Commons

Raindeer writes: "Sion Touhig, an award winning photojournalist, wrote a very interesting piece on how the internet has changed the industry of photojournalism. He blames this (at least partially) on the Creative Commons. Though I disagree with him on this, it does remain a fascinating read on how the lower costs to produce content, the lower transaction costs in finding and disseminating content and the decline in advertising revenue for mainstream media is changing an industry. There are some good reactions already on his blog "

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