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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What happened to Pixel Qi?

An anonymous reader writes: Years ago the OLPC was released with a low-power, outdoor-readable screen. Today there are barely a handful of products bundling Pixel Qi screens. Why aren't Pixel Qi screens in every single smartphone, tablet, laptop, PC and other device with a screen? Is it lack of funding? Lack of marketing? What?

Comment Bad summary: No US troops, only a drill (Score 5, Informative) 395

The game is named Glorious Mission, or sometimes Mission of Honor, not Glorious Revolution, and the plot follows a soldier's life through military camp and cumulates in the eponymous large-scale drill, as reported by China Daily. No US Troops anywhere.

It also supports 32 person multiplayer. You can watch footages of the game on YouTube here.

Submission + - Domesday Project reborn online after 25 years (bbc.co.uk)

clickclickdrone writes: A good idea, combined with the right technology, can change the world. 25 years ago, the BBC dreamt up an inspired scheme. However, in the case of the Domesday Project, it was the tech that doomed it.

The premise was straightforward enough — create a 20th century version of William the Conqueror's 900-year-old page-turner, the Domesday Book.

Instead of land rights and livestock, it would chronicle life in 1980s Britain, based on photographs and written accounts submitted by ordinary people.

It was an incredibly ambitious undertaking and, in many ways, the Domesday Project was a success.

The BBC received more than a million contributions and the electronic version was released commercially.

However, the system was based on laserdiscs, a BBC Master computer and a trackball and over the years, the ability to access the data has been all but lost. Until now...

Science

Submission + - Einstein's Immigration Papers Found at Heathrow (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "When representatives from the Merseyside Maritime Museum paid a routine visit to Heathrow Airport, they were in for a surprise. Looking for any tidbits of the UK's immigration control history, they came across Einstein's Dover landing card dating back to 1933. Apart from being a wonderful snippet of physics history, having been handled by the legendary physicist who transformed the way in which we view the Universe with his general and special theories of relativity, the landing card is a stark reminder about the harrowing pre-war history of Nazi Germany. Stating his nationality as "Swiss," the landing card shows that Einstein, a Jew, had denounced his German nationality only weeks earlier in protest of Adolf Hitler's oppressive regime."
Android

Submission + - The Frankentablet: Windows and Android Mashup (infoworld.com)

GMGruman writes: "What happens if you take a netbook, remove its keyboard, put Windows 7 in one partition, a custom version of Android 2.2 in another, throw in a Linux bootloader, and physical buttons that match none of these? You get the ViewSonic ViewPad 10, a Frankenstein creation of technology body parts that just don't fit together. As this InfoWorld review shows, it's definitely a "were they even thinking?" class of product."
Facebook

Submission + - Who Owns Your Social Identity? (ieee.org) 1

wjousts writes: Who actually owns your username on a website? What rights do you have to use it? What happens if they decide to take it away? IEEE Spectrum reports:

What happens if Facebook or Twitter or, say, your blog hosting service, makes you take a different user name? Sound impossible? It’s happened. Last week, a software researcher named Danah Boyd woke up to find her entire blog had disappeared, and in fact, had been renamed, because her hosting service had given her blog’s name to someone else.

And as important as they are, what protects our accounts are the terms of service agreements. If you read them—and who does?—you’d learn, probably to no surprise, that they protect the provider a lot more then they protect you.


The Military

Russian Army Upgrades Its Inflatable Weapons 197

jamax writes "According to the BBC: 'The Russian military has come up with an inventive way to deceive the enemy and save money at the same time: inflatable weapons. They look just like real ones: they are easy to transport and quick to deploy. You name it, the Russian army is blowing it up: from pretend tanks to entire radar stations.' But the interesting thing is these decoys are not dumb - actually they appear to be highly advanced for what I thought was a WWII-grade aerial photography countermeasures. Apparently they have heat signatures comparable with the military tech they represent, as well as the same radar signature."

Feed Engadget: VLC Media Player for iPad now available, your video codec worries decidedly less (engadget.com)

Well, would you look at that? Ever since Apple added some leeway (and snark!) to its App Store submission rules, the approved apps have become increasingly more interesting: Google Voice clients, a Commodore 64 emulator, and now the VLC Media Player with claims to support "nearly all codec there is." We've spent a few minutes with the program already, and while it's import method is reminiscent of CineXPlayer (i.e. via the Apps tab), the thumbnail-rich interface is much prettier. Official launch date is tomorrow, but we've had no problem downloading from the US and UK stores already, so go ahead and give it a whirl. Or if not, our gallery is below.

VLC Media Player for iPad now available, your video codec worries decidedly lessen originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

PermalinkZath | Applidium, iTunes |Email this|Comments
Technology

Submission + - BP Seals Oil Well Permanently (zacks.com)

rexjoec writes: BP has finally plugged the Macondo well. This announcement came yesterday after $9.5 billion (through September 17) in expenditures and five months of continuous effort.

Submission + - PostgreSQL 9.0 Released (postgresql.org) 1

poet writes: Today the PostgreSQL Global Development Group (PGDG) released PostgreSQL 9.0. This release marks a major milestone in the PostgreSQL ecosystem with added features such as streaming replication (including DDL), Hot Standby and other nifty items such as DO. Get your copy today.

Submission + - Body fishing is a thriving business in China (nwsource.com) 1

vortex2.71 writes: From the Seattle Times — "Wei Jinpeng is a fisher of dead people. He scans the river about 18 miles from Lanzhou, China, for cadavers, drags them to shore with a small boat and then charges grieving families to recover their relatives' corpses. It is a thriving business. While some of the 80 to 100 bodies Wei gathers each year are victims of accidents and floods, he thinks most end up in the river after suicide or murder."
Businesses

Submission + - Keiji Inafune Mulls Japan's Waning Video Games (nytimes.com)

eldavojohn writes: As the creator of Megaman, Keiji Inafune reminisces of the days when Japan redefined video games. He believes those days are long gone as he reveals much in his criticisms of Japan's ailing game economy. Inafune says Japan is five years behind — still making games for older consoles with "no diversity, no originality." When queried why he responds, 'A lot of designers, if they find a genre that works for them, they stick with it. A lot of designers just stick to a set formula. That doesn't work any more. You can't just tweak the graphics, work just on image quality. You can't compete on that. The business side is not keeping up with investment. You need to be prepared to invest 4 billion yen or more on a game, and then spend 2 billion yen more to promote it. But Japanese companies can't do that. So we're losing out to the West in terms of investment in games. It's a vicious cycle, a deflationary spiral. Because you don't invest, you can't sell games, and because you don't sell games, you can't invest.' Inafune goes on to talk about Capcom's problems and Shadow of Rome's failed westernization. He says Level 5 is set to overstep Capcom because they're more forward-looking. He compares making games for Japan and the US to Sushi and basketball — two popular things but each done in distinctly different ways by the two nations. He calls Japanese gaming dead but begs for it to be saved by a rebirth of originality. Inafune travels around the world looking for global ideas to embed in games — not ideas that are solely East or West. He closes by comparing himself to Ryoma Sakamoto, a 19th-century samurai who tried to overthrow Japan's feudal government and open the country up to the West. Inafune reflects on the local popularity of his cautionary words, 'If I lived in medieval Japan, I'd probably be killed too.'
Government

Submission + - Fed CIOs want to hear from you! (federalregister.gov)

beetle496 writes: Chicago, 30 Sept. Listening Session: In order to better understand the needs of diverse communities and provide better solutions, the U.S. Council of CIOs, in collaboration with the Chief Acquisition Officers Council, the GSA Office of Governmentwide Policy and the U.S. Access Board, is holding the first in a series of listening sessions to engage citizens and employees in expressing concerns and proposing ideas. This continues a recent theme.

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