Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Have to publish it in the right place (Score 1) 233

Mailing a sealed envelope is retarded. However, 35 USC 102 has a statutory bar to patentability. Basically, if the invention is published in a printed publication then a future inventor could not go get a patent on the same invention.

I am not a lawyer, not a patent attorney or patent agent. Go talk to your own lawyer.

Comment Re:Generate your own 'fake' logs (Score 1) 857

I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice. Always consult a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction for legal advice and legal services.

I'm not trying to be rude, but you are terribly mistaken in your interpretation of the Commerce Clause of the Constitution.

SCOTUS has pretty much settled on a VERY liberal interpretation of the "interstate commerce" language. They can pretty much regulate any damn thing they want to. Only recently has the court been applying the 10th amendment as a restraint on Congress' commerce powers.

Why the hell do you think that your WiFi device has to comply with FCC regulations? Gee... what does that F stand for?

I'm not saying I agree with the current reality. Merely that the law is likely not what you think it is.

Slashdot readers are NOT lawyers.

Comment Re:Slashdot readers ARE NOT LAWYERS! (Score 1) 857

Sometimes I don't even know why I bother.

You're missing the point completely. The whole point is that "interstate commerce" includes many more things than you would normally think of after a cursory reading.

Simply dismissing reality doesn't make reality less real. 'Belief' is unimportant. Federal laws with Supreme Court approval == reality.

I think the Wickard case is terrible; however, that's a real illustration of Congressional power under the Commerce Clause of the Constitution.

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice. Always consult a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction for legal advice and legal services.

Comment Re:Encrypted traffic... (Score 1) 265

Again... you're missing the point.

If you have contraband in your house and your neighbor breaks in, takes it, and gives it to the police, the police can still use it to prosecute you.

There is no 4th amendment protection even if the neighbor broke the law. Sure, you could sue your neighbor or press charges or whatever, but that doesn't change the fact that YOU are going to be prosecuted based on that contraband the neighbor found.

You're arguing a technicality that doesn't keep you out of jail.

I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice. Always consult a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction for legal advice and legal services. This conversation does not create attorney-client privilege.

Comment Slashdot readers ARE NOT LAWYERS! (Score 2, Informative) 857

LOL. It actually DOES take a law degree. Words in a legal sense quite often have a different 'meaning' than their use in the common vernacular.

What if I told you that Congress can regulate the amount of wheat grown by a farmer solely for personal use, on the grounds that his action affected interstate commerce because he would not be buying wheat on the open market? Even if it would take hundreds of farmers doing the same thing to affect the supply and demand equation?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wickard_v._Filburn

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice.

Slashdot Top Deals

"We don't care. We don't have to. We're the Phone Company."

Working...