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Comment Re:The Turing Test (Score 1) 979

Finally, someone saying something sensible about the Turing Test.
It's an absurdity that serious AI research say things like "we need to make our computer stupider, so it can pass an arbitrary test". These people are supposed to be smart, but here they telling the world that they think the best method of making an intelligent computer is to artificially handicap to be bad at math, make stupid, illogical reasoning choices, have poor memory, etc. just so it can pass as a human.
The utter inanity of that thought is just amazing: the way to make a computer more intelligent is to severely limit it.
Not to mention the dozens of other problems the Turing test runs into, eg. the fact that dogs and horses and dolphins all seem rather intelligent, but would fail a Turing Test, that human calculators like autistic savants, or John von Neumann (he might know something about computers!) would fail. John von Neumann could instantly multiple 2 5 digit numbers in his head when he was 4. He would fail the Turing test, ergo he's not intelligent or conscious. Someone should have told Mrs. von Neumann!

Comment Re:First Post (Score 1) 222

Whether or not video games are dangerous (they very well might be. I think the studies are inconclusive in this regard.) is irrelevent.

We, as free citizens, should be allowed to engage in (reasonably) dangerous activities, activities such as drinking alcohol (Huge in Germany), driving cars (Also huge in Germany), etc.

This isn't a factual matter but a moral, rights-based matter.

Comment Re:Company or store policy? (Score 3, Insightful) 417

That's the stupidest bit of free-market fundamentalism I've heard today.

Due to all kinds of factors like economies of scale, customer loyalty, established physical presence, detailed infrastructure, etc. an existing company has so many competitive advantages over an upstart that to pretend some entrepreneur could (for God knows what reason) start up a consumer electronics store to take on, say Best Buy, is just absurd.

Somehow this perfect entrepreneur would have to know that (for example) Best Buy was paying its managers more than the market reasonably could bear (which is basically impossible since Best Buy now almost wholly comprises the market for big box consumer electronics store, which means that the price BB pays its managers is, de facto, "the market price") and, in order to leverage this into a competitive advantage over BB, this manager would have to run his stores at least as well as BB does in nearly every other respect (the stores would have to be roughly equal in other respects for this small competitive advantage to accrue) and he would have to hope that this disparity in price he pays his managers (which couldn't reasonably be more than a few ~10k per manager) would, eventually, allow him to overtake BB or at least put enough pressure on them to lower their wages, which they would do, driving this stupid entrepreneur out of business, because of all the aforementioned advantages Best Buy has as an entrenched company. For example, BB could pressure suppliers not to sell to this company, or to sell products to him at a higher rate, because BB accounts for a huge amount of, say, Toshiba's laptop PC sales. So if Best Buy says "Either stop selling to this guy with 5 stores or stop selling to me, and my 3500", what do you think Toshiba is going to do?

Of course, this is just an elaborate fiction. None is stupid enough to take on an entrenched monopoly like Best Buy for some Robin Hood goal of righting a wrong in manager pay when anyone with half a brain knows they would be pounded into dust like dozens of companies before them.

On its face, this claim is absurd, that all it would take is ONE company paying its managers "just a little" less will have any effect on anything. Like all free market fantasies, this falls apart as soon as you give it more than a moment's reflection. For example, it forces you to either conclude that Best Buy is almost absolutely perfectly efficient (doubtful) or business leaders would absolutely be jumping at the chance to take them on. Thus if your free market logic were so impeccable, you'd be able to secure money from real capitalists (ie., people with money) and enact the plan yourself. So why haven't you?

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