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Comment How it really works (Score 1) 1055

The 9/80 work schedule is a scam. Youâ(TM)ll have worked the 80 hours, but on Friday there will be a big meeting and youâ(TM)ll need to work. The next off Friday some important maintenance task will come up and youâ(TM)ll need to work. After that there will be a client interaction and youâ(TM)ll need to work. Your company will not pay you overtime for any of these extra Fridays because youâ(TM)re a salaried professional.

Itâ(TM)s a trap!

Comment Take what you can get! (Score 1) 372

Right now is a terrible time to be looking for an entry-level niche position. Those jobs are being filled by mid and senior level workers who just got laid off and will work for an entry level salary to keep their family fed. And if you do get a niche job, youâ(TM)re likely to become the new senior technician when the more expensive hackers get laid off and their jobs are dumped on youâ"which is not a fun situation to be in.

What you need to do is get into a whatever IT job you can, keep working on security stuff at home or in test labs at work, and ride the recession out. Make connections. If you have security people on staff get to know them and show interest so that you might get promoted when something opens up. But whatever you do, donâ(TM)t sit around unemployed and hoping that the perfect niche job pops up, because in this economy thatâ(TM)s not likely to happen.

Security

Submission + - VM-based rootkits proved easily detectable (stanford.edu)

paleshadows writes: A year and a half has passed since SubVirt, the first VMM (virtual machine monitor) based rootkit, was introduced. The idea spawned two lively slashdot discussions: the first, which followed the initial report about SubVirt, and the second, which was conducted after Joanna Rutkowska has recycled the idea (apparently without giving credit to the initial authors). Conversely, in this year's HotOS workshop, researchers from Stanford, CMU, VMware, and XenSource have published a paper titled " Compatibility Is Not Transparency: VMM Detection Myths and Realities" which shows that VMM-based rootkits are actually easily detectable. The introduction of the paper explains that

"While commodity VMMs conform to the PC architecture, virtual implementations of this architecture differ substantially from physical implementations. These differences are not incidental: performance demands and practical engineering limitations necessitate divergences (sometimes radical ones) from native hardware, both in semantics and performance. Consequently, we believe the potential for preventing VMM detection under close scrutiny is illusory — and fundamentally in conflict with the technical limitations of virtualized platforms."

The paper concludes by saying that

"Perhaps the most concise argument against the utility of VMBRs (VM-based rootkits) is: "Why bother?" VMBRs change the malware defender's problem from a very difficult one (discovering whether the trusted computing base of a system has been compromised), to the much easier problem of detecting a VMM."

Music

Submission + - Radiohead lets you choose the price of music (the-anti-spam-program.com)

tehnoir writes: Apparently Trent Reznor isn't the only one getting away from the standard music industry mentality. Radiohead currently has their upcoming album available for pre-order. Currently you can order a box set for the album, or you can order a digital download of the album for whatever you think you should pay. While you must fill in an actual value, 0 is acceptable. Hopefully as more and more artists start exploring new avenues for release, the rest of the industry will catch on; though I'm not holding my breath yet.
Programming

Submission + - Whats the best platform for mobile development? (blogspot.com)

An anonymous reader writes: For a hobbyist programmer what should be the the target platform iPhone, Java ME, Windows Mobile, Linux, Palm, Brew, Symbian or Blackberry. Who provides the best tools and sdk's for development on these platforms?
Microsoft

Microsoft Publishes Free XBox Development Tools 221

prostoalex writes "Microsoft announced the release of free XNA Game Studio Express tools for developing C# games that run on both Windows and XBox. They're also selling XNA Creators Club subscriptions, which, similar to MSDN subscriptions, offer access to sample code and additional documentation. Also, Microsoft is explicitly aiming towards uniting the Windows and XBox development platforms: 'You will have to compile the game once for each platform. In this release simply create a separate project for each platform and then compile them both. Our goal is to allow as much code as possible to be shared between those two projects, allowing you to use the same source files in both projects, but platform-specific code will need to be conditionally-compiled.'"
Microsoft

Submission + - New developments at Microsoft Research

prostoalex writes: "Information Week magazine runs a brief report from Microsoft Research, showcasing some of the new technologies the company's research division is working on. Among them — a rootkit that eliminates other rootkits, a firewall that blocks the traffic exploiting published vulnerabilities, a system for catching lost e-mail, a honeypot targeted at discovering zero-day exploits as well as some anti-phishing applications."
Wii

Submission + - Top 5 Wii Downfalls

Deathspawner writes: "Since the Wii has been released there has been mostly great things said about it. Techgage has found more wrong than right with the console however, and lays out five prime reasons where the Wii fails and should be improved. Some of the features picked on include the subpar online Virtual Console selection, clunky setup and even the reason the Wii is popular to begin with."

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