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Comment Timeline of Treason (Score 1, Informative) 455

Dec. 10, 2015
Lt. Gen Michael Flynn is part of a panel discussion in Moscow for the 10th anniversary of government-backed Russia Today, for which he receives payment (The Washington Post, Aug. 15, 2016). Officials notice an increase in communication between Flynn and the Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak, following the Russia Today event (CNN, May 19, 2017).

Late 2015
British intelligence agencies detect suspicious interactions between Russia and Trump aides that they pass on to American intelligence agencies (The Guardian, April 13, 2017).

March 19, 2016
Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta is sent an email that encourages him to change his email password, likely precipitating the hack of his account (CBS News, Oct. 28, 2016).

March 21
During an interview with The Post, Trump lists Carter Page as part of his foreign policy team. Page had been recommended by a son-in-law of President Richard Nixon, New York Republican Party Chairman Ed Cox (WP, March 21, 2016).

March 28
Political veteran Paul Manafort is hired to help the Trump campaign manage the delegate process for the Republican National Convention. He is recommended by Trump confidante Roger Stone (New York Times, March 28, 2016). Before joining the campaign, Manafort lobbied on behalf of Oleg Deripaska, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin. That deal followed a memo from Manafort in which he offered a plan that could "greatly benefit the Putin Government." His relationship with Deripaska ended in 2009 (Associated Press, March 22, 2017). Manafort also worked on behalf of the Russia-friendly Party of Regions in Ukraine, helping guide the party's leader, Viktor Yanukovych, to the country's presidency. Yanukovych would later be ousted. (WP, Aug. 19, 2016)

April 27
Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) may have met with Kislyak at a reception at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington before a foreign-policy speech given by Trump (CNN, May 31, 2017).

June
At a closed-door meeting of foreign policy experts and the prime minister of India, Page praises Putin effusively (WP, Aug. 5, 2016).

June 15
A hacker calling himself "Guccifer 2.0" releases the Democratic National Committee's research file on Donald Trump (Gawker, June 15, 2016). News reports already link the stolen data to Russian hackers (WP, June 14, 2016).

July
At some point this month, the FBI begins investigating possible links between the Russian government and Trump's campaign (Wired, March 20, 2017).

July 7
Page travels to Moscow to give a lecture (NYT, April 19, 2017). The Trump campaign approved the trip (USA Today, March 7, 2017). This trip was likely the catalyst for the FBI's request for a secret surveillance warrant to track PageÃs communications (WP, May 25, 2017).

July 11 or 12
Trump campaign staffers intervene with the committee developing the Republican Party's national security platform to remove language call arming Ukraine against Russian aggression. (July 18, 2016).

July 18
At an event hosted by the Heritage Foundation as part of the Republican National Convention, Sessions and Kislyak have a brief conversation (WP, March 2, 2017).

Flynn delivers a speech at the Republican convention, joining in the crowd's "Lock her up!" chant. "If I, a guy who knows this business, if I did a tenth of what she did," Flynn said, "I would be in jail today" (C-Span, July 18, 2016).

July 22
Wikileaks releases emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee (WP, July 22, 2017).

Jul. 27
During his last news conference of the campaign, Trump asks Russia to release emails hacked from Clinton's private server. He later says that he was joking (WP, July, 27, 2016).

Aug. 9
Flynn Intel Group, a consulting firm founded by Flynn, signs a contract with Inovo BV, a firm run by a Turkish businessman close to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, for more than $500,000 (Daily Caller, Nov. 11, 2016).

Aug. 15
The New York Times reports on secret ledgers from the Party of Regions showing off-the-books payments to ManafortÃs consulting firm (NYT, Aug. 15, 2016). Those payments were allegedly hidden by passing them through third parties, according to Ukrainian leaders (WP, March 21, 2017).

Aug. 19
Manafort is fired from the campaign (NYT, Aug. 19, 2016). He'd reportedly lost the confidence of Trump's family, including son-in-law Jared Kushner (Politico, Aug. 19, 2016).

Aug. 21
Stone tweets, "Trust me, it will soon [be] Podesta's time in the barrel" (Aug. 21, 2016).

Aug. 23
Stone communicates with Guccifer 2.0 privately over Twitter (Smoking Gun, March 8, 2017).

September
At some point in September, congressional leaders are briefed about the CIA's belief that Russia was intervening in the election to benefit Trump (WP, Dec. 9, 2016).

Sept. 8
Sessions and Kislyak meet in Sessions's Senate office (WP, March 2, 2017).

Oct. 7
The director of national intelligence and the head of the Department of Homeland Security release an unusual joint statement in which they warn of Russian efforts to meddle in the election and suggest that Russia had a hand in the Wikileaks document releases (DHS, Oct. 7, 2016).

Oct. 8
Shortly after the publication of a 2005 "Access Hollywood" video in which Trump discusses sexually assaulting women, Wikileaks releases the first emails from Podesta's email account. The leaks continue for weeks (WP, Oct. 8, 2016).

Oct. 12
Stone tells a reporter from a local news station in Florida that he has "back-channel communication with [Wikileaks' Julian] Assange," though he'd never spoken to Assange directly (CBS, Oct. 12, 2016). Wikileaks later denies the assertion (CNN, March 27, 2017).

Oct. 19
During the final presidential debate, Trump says that Putin has no respect for his opponent, Hillary Clinton. She responds, "That's because he'd rather have a puppet as president of the United States."

"No puppet," Trump replies. ""You're the puppet."

Trump then argues that Clinton doesn't know who's behind the hacking, if it's "Russia, China, or anybody else" (WP, Oct. 19, 2016),

Nov. 8
An opinion piece supporting the Turkish government runs in the Hill under FlynnÃs byline (The Hill, Nov. 8, 2016).

Trump is elected president.

During the transition

Nov. 10
In his Oval Office meeting with Trump, Barack Obama warns the president-elect against hiring Flynn as national security adviser (WP, May 8, 2017).

Nov. 18
Trump offers Flynn the job of national security adviser (CNN, Nov. 18, 2016). Trump offers Sessions the job of attorney general. These are two of the first appointments Trump makes (WP, Nov. 18, 2016).

Late November
Trump transition team members warn Flynn that his communications with Kislyak will be monitored by American intelligence agencies. To impress upon Flynn the risks of cozying up to the Russian ambassador, the team requests a dossier on Kislyak to share with Flynn. It's not known if he ever read it (WP, May 5, 2017).

Nov. 28
In an interview with Time magazine, Trump denies interference from Russia. "I don't believe they interfered," he said. "That became a laughing point, not a talking point, a laughing point. Any time I do something, they say Ãoh, Russia interfered.'"

He also addressed the hacking: "It could be Russia. And it could be China. And it could be some guy in his home in New Jersey" (Time, Nov. 28, 2016).

Nov. 30
The Justice Department informs Flynn that he is under investigation for his unreported lobbying on behalf of Turkey (NYT, May 17, 2017).

Dec. 1 (or 2)
Flynn and Kushner meet with Kislyak at Trump Tower (NYT, March 2, 2017). Kushner proposes setting up a back-channel of communication between the administration and Putin, perhaps going so far as to use secure communications systems at the Russian embassy (WP, May 26, 2017). The FBI believes the conversation may have included a suggestion by the Russians that easing sanctions would allow Russian banks to offer financing to people with ties to Trump (Reuters, May 27, 2017). Sources close to Kushner indicate the the only focus of the back-channel would be Syria (Fox, May 30, 2017).

Dec. 8
Page is back in Moscow to meet with "business leaders and thought leaders" (NYT, Dec. 8, 2016).

Dec. 13 or 14
At Kislyak's urging, Kushner meets with Sergey Gorkov, chairman of Russia's government-owned Vnesheconombank and a confidante of Putin. The bank, known as VEB, is under sanction from the U.S. government (NYT, March 27, 2017).

Dec. 14
Gorkov apparently flies to Japan, as Putin was visiting (WP, June 1, 2017).

Dec. 25
Flynn texts Kislyak to wish him a merry Christmas (NPR, Jan. 13, 2017).

Dec. 29
The Obama administration orders new sanctions against Russian organizations and individuals in response to Russian interference in the election. (WP, Dec. 29, 2016).

Flynn calls Kislyak a reported five times (Reuters, Jan. 23, 2017). Among the topics of discussion: the government's sanctions of Russia (WP, Feb. 9, 2017).

Dec. 30
In a tweet, Trump praises Putin's decision not to respond in kind to the U.S. sanctions (Dec. 30, 2016).

Jan. 4, 2017
Flynn informs Don McGahn, chief attorney for the transition effort, that he's under investigation by the FBI (NYT, May 17, 2017).

Jan. 6
American intelligence agencies release a report outlining why they believe Russia was behind the campaign hacking (NYT, Jan. 6, 2017).

Jan. 9
The Trump transition team announces that Kushner will join the administration as an unpaid senior adviser (Fox, Jan. 9, 2017).

Jan. 10
The Senate holds confirmation hearings for SessionsÃs attorney general bid. In that hearing, Sessions is asked what he would do if "anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign communicated with the Russian government in the course of this campaign." Sessions replies that "I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign and I did not have communications with the Russians, and I'm unable to comment on it" (WP, Jan. 10, 2017).

Outgoing national security adviser Susan Rice asks Flynn to approve an operation in Syria in alliance with Kurdish forces that would extend into Trump's presidency. The alliance with the Kurds is opposed by the Turkish government. Flynn declines (Miami Herald, May 17, 2017).

Jan. 11
At a news conference, Trump discusses the hacking that took place during the election. "As far as hacking, I think it was Russia, but I think we also get hacked by other countries and other people," he said (CNBC, Jan. 11, 2017).

Jan. 15
On CBS, Pence denies that Flynn and Kislyak discussed sanctions (CBS, Jan. 15, 2017).

Jan. 17
Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) sends a list of questions to Sessions, including one that reads, "Have you been in contact with anyone connected to any part of the Russian government about the 2016 election, either before or after Election Day?" Sessions responds, "No" (WP, Jan. 17, 2017).

Jan. 18
Kushner submits his application for top-secret security clearance, excluding a number of meetings with foreign officials, including the one in December (NYT, April 6, 2017).

Jan. 20
Trump is inaugurated.

The presidency

Jan. 22
Flynn is sworn in as national security adviser (WP, Jan. 22, 2017).

Jan. 24
The FBI interviews Flynn about his conversations with Kislyak the previous month (NYT, Feb. 14, 2017).

Jan. 25
Acting Attorney General Sally Yates receives a breakdown of the Flynn interview and decides to inform the White House about what was said (ABC, May 8, 2017).

Jan. 26
Yates meets with McGahn, now White House counsel, and explains what Flynn revealed during the FBI interview and that it contradicts public statements from the vice president, making it possible that the Russians could compromise the national security adviser by threatening to leak that information (ABC, May 8, 2017). McGahn "immediately" briefs Trump on the conversation (Slate, Feb. 17, 2017).

Jan. 27
Yates returns to the White House to meet with McGahn again at his request. McGahn asks to review the evidence against Flynn (ABC, May 8, 2017).

During a private dinner at the White House, Trump allegedly asks FBI Director James Comey to pledge that he'd be loyal to the president. Instead, Comey offers only his honesty (NYT, May 11, 2017).

Trump signs his executive order on immigration (WP, Jan. 27, 2017).

Jan. 30
Yates invites McGahn to come to the FBI and review the evidence against Flynn (ABC, May 8, 2017).

Trump fires Yates after she refuses to enforce his immigration ban (NYT, Jan. 30, 2017).

Week of Feb. 6
Trump Organization lawyer Michael Cohen and business associate Felix Sater partner with a Ukrainian lawmaker on a proposal for easing Russian-Ukrainian tensions, which is delivered to FlynnÃs office. (NYT, Feb. 19, 2017).

Feb. 8
Sessions is confirmed as attorney general (Senate, Feb. 8, 2017).

Feb. 11
Flynn files a financial disclosure that omits his payment from Russia Today (Daily Beast, April 1, 2017).

Feb. 13
Flynn resigns as national security adviser (NYT, Feb. 13, 2017).

Feb. 15 (est.)
At some point after a New York Times report about communication between Trump staff and Russia during 2016, the White House allegedly asked Comey and McCabe to publicly deny the report (NYT, Feb. 23, 2017). Comey later indicates that he told Trump that such communications between the White House and FBI were inappropriate (NYT, May 18, 2017).

March 2
Attorney General Jeff Sessions annouces that he will recuse himself from any Russia investigation after his meetings with Kislyak are revealed (WP, March 2, 2017).

March 5
In an interview on NBC, former director of national intelligence James Clapper acknowledges that he had no knowledge of evidence proving that Russia and the Trump campaign colluded during the course of the campaign (NBC, March 5, 2017). He later clarifies that he would not necessarily have known about such evidence and that he was not aware of the FBI's investigation (Politifact, May 12, 2017).

March 31
Flynn amends his report (Daily Beast, April 1, 2017).

citation provided

Comment Timeline of Treason (Score 1) 210

Dec. 10, 2015
Lt. Gen Michael Flynn is part of a panel discussion in Moscow for the 10th anniversary of government-backed Russia Today, for which he receives payment (The Washington Post, Aug. 15, 2016). Officials notice an increase in communication between Flynn and the Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak, following the Russia Today event (CNN, May 19, 2017).

Late 2015
British intelligence agencies detect suspicious interactions between Russia and Trump aides that they pass on to American intelligence agencies (The Guardian, April 13, 2017).

March 19, 2016
Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta is sent an email that encourages him to change his email password, likely precipitating the hack of his account (CBS News, Oct. 28, 2016).

March 21
During an interview with The Post, Trump lists Carter Page as part of his foreign policy team. Page had been recommended by a son-in-law of President Richard Nixon, New York Republican Party Chairman Ed Cox (WP, March 21, 2016).

March 28
Political veteran Paul Manafort is hired to help the Trump campaign manage the delegate process for the Republican National Convention. He is recommended by Trump confidante Roger Stone (New York Times, March 28, 2016). Before joining the campaign, Manafort lobbied on behalf of Oleg Deripaska, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin. That deal followed a memo from Manafort in which he offered a plan that could "greatly benefit the Putin Government." His relationship with Deripaska ended in 2009 (Associated Press, March 22, 2017). Manafort also worked on behalf of the Russia-friendly Party of Regions in Ukraine, helping guide the party's leader, Viktor Yanukovych, to the country's presidency. Yanukovych would later be ousted. (WP, Aug. 19, 2016)

April 27
Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) may have met with Kislyak at a reception at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington before a foreign-policy speech given by Trump (CNN, May 31, 2017).

June
At a closed-door meeting of foreign policy experts and the prime minister of India, Page praises Putin effusively (WP, Aug. 5, 2016).

June 15
A hacker calling himself "Guccifer 2.0" releases the Democratic National Committee's research file on Donald Trump (Gawker, June 15, 2016). News reports already link the stolen data to Russian hackers (WP, June 14, 2016).

July
At some point this month, the FBI begins investigating possible links between the Russian government and Trump's campaign (Wired, March 20, 2017).

July 7
Page travels to Moscow to give a lecture (NYT, April 19, 2017). The Trump campaign approved the trip (USA Today, March 7, 2017). This trip was likely the catalyst for the FBI's request for a secret surveillance warrant to track Pageâs communications (WP, May 25, 2017).

July 11 or 12
Trump campaign staffers intervene with the committee developing the Republican Party's national security platform to remove language call arming Ukraine against Russian aggression. (July 18, 2016).

July 18
At an event hosted by the Heritage Foundation as part of the Republican National Convention, Sessions and Kislyak have a brief conversation (WP, March 2, 2017).

Flynn delivers a speech at the Republican convention, joining in the crowd's "Lock her up!" chant. "If I, a guy who knows this business, if I did a tenth of what she did," Flynn said, "I would be in jail today" (C-Span, July 18, 2016).

July 22
Wikileaks releases emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee (WP, July 22, 2017).

Jul. 27
During his last news conference of the campaign, Trump asks Russia to release emails hacked from Clinton's private server. He later says that he was joking (WP, July, 27, 2016).

Aug. 9
Flynn Intel Group, a consulting firm founded by Flynn, signs a contract with Inovo BV, a firm run by a Turkish businessman close to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, for more than $500,000 (Daily Caller, Nov. 11, 2016).

Aug. 15
The New York Times reports on secret ledgers from the Party of Regions showing off-the-books payments to Manafortâs consulting firm (NYT, Aug. 15, 2016). Those payments were allegedly hidden by passing them through third parties, according to Ukrainian leaders (WP, March 21, 2017).

Aug. 19
Manafort is fired from the campaign (NYT, Aug. 19, 2016). He'd reportedly lost the confidence of Trump's family, including son-in-law Jared Kushner (Politico, Aug. 19, 2016).

Aug. 21
Stone tweets, "Trust me, it will soon [be] Podesta's time in the barrel" (Aug. 21, 2016).

Aug. 23
Stone communicates with Guccifer 2.0 privately over Twitter (Smoking Gun, March 8, 2017).

September
At some point in September, congressional leaders are briefed about the CIA's belief that Russia was intervening in the election to benefit Trump (WP, Dec. 9, 2016).

Sept. 8
Sessions and Kislyak meet in Sessions's Senate office (WP, March 2, 2017).

Oct. 7
The director of national intelligence and the head of the Department of Homeland Security release an unusual joint statement in which they warn of Russian efforts to meddle in the election and suggest that Russia had a hand in the Wikileaks document releases (DHS, Oct. 7, 2016).

Oct. 8
Shortly after the publication of a 2005 "Access Hollywood" video in which Trump discusses sexually assaulting women, Wikileaks releases the first emails from Podesta's email account. The leaks continue for weeks (WP, Oct. 8, 2016).

Oct. 12
Stone tells a reporter from a local news station in Florida that he has "back-channel communication with [Wikileaks' Julian] Assange," though he'd never spoken to Assange directly (CBS, Oct. 12, 2016). Wikileaks later denies the assertion (CNN, March 27, 2017).

Oct. 19
During the final presidential debate, Trump says that Putin has no respect for his opponent, Hillary Clinton. She responds, "That's because he'd rather have a puppet as president of the United States."

"No puppet," Trump replies. ""You're the puppet."

Trump then argues that Clinton doesn't know who's behind the hacking, if it's "Russia, China, or anybody else" (WP, Oct. 19, 2016),

Nov. 8
An opinion piece supporting the Turkish government runs in the Hill under Flynnâs byline (The Hill, Nov. 8, 2016).

Trump is elected president.

During the transition

Nov. 10
In his Oval Office meeting with Trump, Barack Obama warns the president-elect against hiring Flynn as national security adviser (WP, May 8, 2017).

Nov. 18
Trump offers Flynn the job of national security adviser (CNN, Nov. 18, 2016). Trump offers Sessions the job of attorney general. These are two of the first appointments Trump makes (WP, Nov. 18, 2016).

Late November
Trump transition team members warn Flynn that his communications with Kislyak will be monitored by American intelligence agencies. To impress upon Flynn the risks of cozying up to the Russian ambassador, the team requests a dossier on Kislyak to share with Flynn. It's not known if he ever read it (WP, May 5, 2017).

Nov. 28
In an interview with Time magazine, Trump denies interference from Russia. "I don't believe they interfered," he said. "That became a laughing point, not a talking point, a laughing point. Any time I do something, they say âoh, Russia interfered.'"

He also addressed the hacking: "It could be Russia. And it could be China. And it could be some guy in his home in New Jersey" (Time, Nov. 28, 2016).

Nov. 30
The Justice Department informs Flynn that he is under investigation for his unreported lobbying on behalf of Turkey (NYT, May 17, 2017).

Dec. 1 (or 2)
Flynn and Kushner meet with Kislyak at Trump Tower (NYT, March 2, 2017). Kushner proposes setting up a back-channel of communication between the administration and Putin, perhaps going so far as to use secure communications systems at the Russian embassy (WP, May 26, 2017). The FBI believes the conversation may have included a suggestion by the Russians that easing sanctions would allow Russian banks to offer financing to people with ties to Trump (Reuters, May 27, 2017). Sources close to Kushner indicate the the only focus of the back-channel would be Syria (Fox, May 30, 2017).

Dec. 8
Page is back in Moscow to meet with "business leaders and thought leaders" (NYT, Dec. 8, 2016).

Dec. 13 or 14
At Kislyak's urging, Kushner meets with Sergey Gorkov, chairman of Russia's government-owned Vnesheconombank and a confidante of Putin. The bank, known as VEB, is under sanction from the U.S. government (NYT, March 27, 2017).

Dec. 14
Gorkov apparently flies to Japan, as Putin was visiting (WP, June 1, 2017).

Dec. 25
Flynn texts Kislyak to wish him a merry Christmas (NPR, Jan. 13, 2017).

Dec. 29
The Obama administration orders new sanctions against Russian organizations and individuals in response to Russian interference in the election. (WP, Dec. 29, 2016).

Flynn calls Kislyak a reported five times (Reuters, Jan. 23, 2017). Among the topics of discussion: the government's sanctions of Russia (WP, Feb. 9, 2017).

Dec. 30
In a tweet, Trump praises Putin's decision not to respond in kind to the U.S. sanctions (Dec. 30, 2016).

Jan. 4, 2017
Flynn informs Don McGahn, chief attorney for the transition effort, that he's under investigation by the FBI (NYT, May 17, 2017).

Jan. 6
American intelligence agencies release a report outlining why they believe Russia was behind the campaign hacking (NYT, Jan. 6, 2017).

Jan. 9
The Trump transition team announces that Kushner will join the administration as an unpaid senior adviser (Fox, Jan. 9, 2017).

Jan. 10
The Senate holds confirmation hearings for Sessionsâs attorney general bid. In that hearing, Sessions is asked what he would do if "anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign communicated with the Russian government in the course of this campaign." Sessions replies that "I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign and I did not have communications with the Russians, and I'm unable to comment on it" (WP, Jan. 10, 2017).

Outgoing national security adviser Susan Rice asks Flynn to approve an operation in Syria in alliance with Kurdish forces that would extend into Trump's presidency. The alliance with the Kurds is opposed by the Turkish government. Flynn declines (Miami Herald, May 17, 2017).

Jan. 11
At a news conference, Trump discusses the hacking that took place during the election. "As far as hacking, I think it was Russia, but I think we also get hacked by other countries and other people," he said (CNBC, Jan. 11, 2017).

Jan. 15
On CBS, Pence denies that Flynn and Kislyak discussed sanctions (CBS, Jan. 15, 2017).

Jan. 17
Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) sends a list of questions to Sessions, including one that reads, "Have you been in contact with anyone connected to any part of the Russian government about the 2016 election, either before or after Election Day?" Sessions responds, "No" (WP, Jan. 17, 2017).

Jan. 18
Kushner submits his application for top-secret security clearance, excluding a number of meetings with foreign officials, including the one in December (NYT, April 6, 2017).

Jan. 20
Trump is inaugurated.

The presidency

Jan. 22
Flynn is sworn in as national security adviser (WP, Jan. 22, 2017).

Jan. 24
The FBI interviews Flynn about his conversations with Kislyak the previous month (NYT, Feb. 14, 2017).

Jan. 25
Acting Attorney General Sally Yates receives a breakdown of the Flynn interview and decides to inform the White House about what was said (ABC, May 8, 2017).

Jan. 26
Yates meets with McGahn, now White House counsel, and explains what Flynn revealed during the FBI interview and that it contradicts public statements from the vice president, making it possible that the Russians could compromise the national security adviser by threatening to leak that information (ABC, May 8, 2017). McGahn "immediately" briefs Trump on the conversation (Slate, Feb. 17, 2017).

Jan. 27
Yates returns to the White House to meet with McGahn again at his request. McGahn asks to review the evidence against Flynn (ABC, May 8, 2017).

During a private dinner at the White House, Trump allegedly asks FBI Director James Comey to pledge that he'd be loyal to the president. Instead, Comey offers only his honesty (NYT, May 11, 2017).

Trump signs his executive order on immigration (WP, Jan. 27, 2017).

Jan. 30
Yates invites McGahn to come to the FBI and review the evidence against Flynn (ABC, May 8, 2017).

Trump fires Yates after she refuses to enforce his immigration ban (NYT, Jan. 30, 2017).

Week of Feb. 6
Trump Organization lawyer Michael Cohen and business associate Felix Sater partner with a Ukrainian lawmaker on a proposal for easing Russian-Ukrainian tensions, which is delivered to Flynnâs office. (NYT, Feb. 19, 2017).

Feb. 8
Sessions is confirmed as attorney general (Senate, Feb. 8, 2017).

Feb. 11
Flynn files a financial disclosure that omits his payment from Russia Today (Daily Beast, April 1, 2017).

Feb. 13
Flynn resigns as national security adviser (NYT, Feb. 13, 2017).

Feb. 15 (est.)
At some point after a New York Times report about communication between Trump staff and Russia during 2016, the White House allegedly asked Comey and McCabe to publicly deny the report (NYT, Feb. 23, 2017). Comey later indicates that he told Trump that such communications between the White House and FBI were inappropriate (NYT, May 18, 2017).

March 2
Attorney General Jeff Sessions annouces that he will recuse himself from any Russia investigation after his meetings with Kislyak are revealed (WP, March 2, 2017).

March 5
In an interview on NBC, former director of national intelligence James Clapper acknowledges that he had no knowledge of evidence proving that Russia and the Trump campaign colluded during the course of the campaign (NBC, March 5, 2017). He later clarifies that he would not necessarily have known about such evidence and that he was not aware of the FBI's investigation (Politifact, May 12, 2017).

March 31
Flynn amends his report (Daily Beast, April 1, 2017).

citation provided

Comment Re:This is Why (Score 1, Interesting) 210

Trump sued someone for libel in the amount if 5 billion doallrs, for claiming he was not actually a billionaire. Donald Trump was unable to prove that he actually had assets worth a billion dollars in court.

The difference is that when Donald Trump sues you, he's not suing you for lying. Donald Trump sues you for telling the truth.

Citation Provided

Like with his treasonous collaboration with Russia's crimes in the USA, Donald Trump was his own worst enemy. When he filed the lawsuit Trump was subjected to a hilarious deposition where is constant lying was the topic of discussion.

Fast forward 10 years and Donald Trump has highlighted the fact that he has been exposed as a traitor by firing FBI director James Comey.

Comment Re:Good (Score 2, Funny) 429

Your argument seems to hinge on Donald Trump being neither stupid nor deranged.

I think you are on shaky footing there, to put it mildly...

It's easy to collude with Russia and get caught. All you have to do is commit treason while not being careful enough to avoid investigation and prosecution.

Colluding with Russia, and not getting caught in the act is considerably harder.

Government experience would be helpful to avoid getting caught, and to avoid highlighting your treason by committing a major blunder. Donald Trump isn't bright, but his inexperience played a bigger part in his firing the FBI director for investigating Russia, and then bragging about it on TV and to the Russians.

Comment Re:Good (Score 1) 429

Hehe, sure...

Guccifer may not be Russian, though the evidence points to him being a Russian government agent.

How someone can talk to a known participant to a criminal hack during the hack and data release itself without colluding is just beyond words. That may be enough to keep that traitor out of prison but give me a break. This is collusion.

Trump's team may not be talking to the Russian government to coordinate their information and hacking attack on our presidential campaign, though the evidence shows that they did. Evidence further shows there was and is a quid pro quo, like changing the GOP platform to not oppose Russia's violent annexation of Crimea, part of our ally Ukraine's territory.

The FBI may not be investigating Donald Trump because he conspired with a hostile foreign adversary's crime spree during our recent Presidential election, but leaks indicate that they are investigating exactly that conspiracy.

The investigation is currently uncovering wrongdoing, but is not yet complete. Your suggestion that the fact that investigation is not yet complete actually indicates Trump's innocence is laughable.

Comment Re:Good (Score 1) 429

Yeah.. no evidence of collusion as the criminal investigation uncovers criminal collusion with Russia's attack on the presidential campaign on a daily basis..

Just an example - Roger Stone communicated with Giccifer on Twitter. Guccifer is a known Russian government hacker, and hacked the DNC. He admitted his communication with a known Russian hacker during the hack. This is not hard to follow, and is just one of dozens of examples.

Now you can keep saying nothing has been found, but the FBI is finding stuff every day, and is building a report. Donald Trump admitted (to the Russian ambassador at the center of the investigation) in the Oval Office that he fired Comey to end the Russia investigation.

Just keep telling yourself there is no evidence of collusion, as that will make Trump's indictments and impeachment that much sweeter.

Comment Re:Tard or Traitor? Both. (Score -1, Troll) 286

Fascists fire their FBI director when an FBI investigation closes in on their collaboration with Russia (a foreign adversary) on their hack of our presidential campaign. Would it offend you if I call Trump's collaboration with the crimes of foreign adversary's treason?

Only a fascist would fire the head of the FBI to protect himself from an ongoing investigation.

Only an idiot wouldn't be able to see that while picking out every 3rd word to take offense at my lack of political correctness.

Comment Tard or Traitor? Both. (Score -1, Troll) 286

Americans are stupid.. We can all agree on that. France is lucky that an average Frenchman is much smarter than at typical borderline retarded American. I know the truth hurts, and am sorry for any pain that obvious truth causes to abject morons.

Just look at all the comments below from people to stupid to see the obvious reality that they themselves are commenting on...

However, we can't discount the impact of traitors collaborating with Russia in their attack on our election. Donald Trump is stupid, but he is also a traitor.

The republican senators and congressmen assisting Donald Trump's obstruction of justice are genuinely smart, but they are also obvious traitors.

The republican party's collaboration with Trump's coverup of Russia's attack on our election, and his collusion with their attack can not be ignored.

The people who don't see Russia's attack on our election are stupid, but their elected representatives are traitors.

Comment How gullible are you? (Score 5, Insightful) 810

Donald Trump publicly complemented Comey's press conferences and other actions related to Hillary's email during his campaign events.

How stupid would you have to be to believe that Donald Trump fired Comey for the actions which he publicly commended him for?

Donald Trump is preparing for his criminal prosecution and impeachment just like Richard Nixon did in the leadup to his resignation in disgrace.

Comment I'm a PC and I have a touchscreen (Score 0, Troll) 247

It's kinda funny how despite the way Apple brands itself as innovative and user friendly, but Mac users are still stuck using a mouse on icons and menus while Windows has a touch-friendly interface.

Keep spending big on antiquated technology Apple users. Maybe one day the ghost of Steve Jobs will give you a touch screen and claim it's a revolutionary invention...

Comment Donald Trump congratulates Turkey's dictator (Score 4, Insightful) 94

Donald Trump has been instructed by Vladamir Putin to congratulate Turkey's dictator on his recent elimination of democracy in his country.

As a known secret agent working for Turkey on behalf of Russia, Michael Flynn said in an op-ed "Our ally Turkey is in crisis and needs our support"

Michael Flynn was working as a secret foreign agent when he wrote that op-ed, and Donald Trump knew he had found his new National Security Adviser.

It might not make sense to pick a secret foreign agent to be national security advisor, but you have to remember, Vladimir Putin picked our national security adviser, and it makes perfect sense to him.

Comment Re:I knew it! (Score 2) 347

Considering that many Trump advisers are under FBI investigation for collusion, that Trump owes tons of money to Russian banks, and that Donald Trump still can't speak a hurtful word about his puppet master Vladimir Putin, maybe you should examine your own critical thinking skills.

The FBI considers the Pee-Tape dossier to be a credible document, as they have corroborated several parts of that document.

Also attorney general Jeff Sessions lied under oath about his collusion with Russia.

But sure.. it's funny to pretend that your government isn't controlled by a hostile foreign adversary. It's not accurate, but it's funny.

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