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Comment Oh Really (Score 2, Funny) 359

Thank you for this vast work of erudition, anonymous moron.

Someday, perhaps, when you are a pre-adolescent, you may aquire somewhat more knowledge of computers, though probably not enough to make you top-heavy. At that time, you may hear of a miraculous device called a gate-array which makes it possible to craft a running CPU similarly to the way that programmers write software. With this device, someone of greater skill than you will put together a computer that might not be as fast as you like, and might not have as many transistors as you like, and might use more power than you like, but will be capable of running an Open Source CPU with a known-bitstream so that the chance of there being nasties that we're not told about that spy on us built into the CPU die is reduced from today's horrible state (gate-arrays can still have them, but the people who make these nasties don't know in advance where we put the CPU implementation).

The instruction set and currently-fixed hardware features like the MMU and the translation look-aside buffer (a feature implicated today) will be repairable by changing the bitstream.

This will never be as efficient as a fully-custom chip, but it can be good enough. Many of us will be happier using it. And for those of us who require algorithm acceleration (hopefully for better reasons than mining cryptocoins, but that is one example) it will be possible to code it into the system and get the advantages of a hardware implementation without it being so hard.

Comment Just one way to get everything you want (Score 4, Interesting) 359

If you really want an Open Source, after-market bug fixes, and security, the best way to do that is to use not a CPU at all but a programmable gate-array. This also gives you the ability to have evolution in purchased hardware, for example improvement of the instruction set. The problem is finding a gate-array that is fast enough, dense enough, and power-conserving enough.

It would be cool to code your own special-purpose algorithm accelerators in VHDL or Verilog, etc.

This is sort of on the edge of practical, if you have the money to spend. Not as fast, not as powerful, uses more electricity, infinitely flexible. Certainly there would be some good research papers, etc., in building one.

Comment Re:back to value (Score 1) 267

Yeah, it's no secure, but people love to think that.

When people are talking secure, they don't just mean the block chain, but bitcoins fans can't seem to grok that.

Remember 50btc? suddenly, and without evidence, they had a DDOS attack and could move coins out. Then they were down, and then the disappeared; with peoples coins. OS yeah, real secure.

How many wallets have been stolen from?

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