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Submission + - Beijing Wants A.I. to Be Made in China by 2030 (nytimes.com)

cdreimer writes: According to a report on The New York Times (may be paywalled, alternative story here): "If Beijing has its way, the future of artificial intelligence will be made in China. The country laid out a development plan on Thursday to become the world leader in A.I. by 2030, aiming to surpass its rivals technologically and build a domestic industry worth almost $150 billion. Released by the State Council, the policy is a statement of intent from the top rungs of China’s government: The world’s second-largest economy will be investing heavily to ensure its companies, government and military leap to the front of the pack in a technology many think will one day form the basis of computing. The plan comes with China preparing a multibillion-dollar national investment initiative to support “moonshot” projects, start-ups and academic research in A.I., according to two professors who consulted with the government about the effort."

Submission + - Capturing data on New Horizons' next flyby target

necro81 writes: After its successful flyby of Pluto in July 2015, the New Horizons probe received a mission extension to fly past a Kuiper Belt object — named 2014 MU69 — in January 2019. However, we know few details about the object — its size, shape, albedo, whether it has any companions — which are crucial for planning the flyby. Based on observations from Hubble, the New Horizons team knew that the object would pass in front of a star — an occultation — on July 17th, which could provide some of this data. But the occultation would last for less than a second, would only be visible in Patagonia, and the star itself is quite dim. NASA set up 24 telescopes near one community to capture the event, and received lots of cooperation from locals: turning off streetlights, shutting down a nearby highway, and setting up trucks as windbreaks. At least five of those telescopes captured the occultation. This was the latest in a series of observations ahead of the flyby.

Submission + - A Third of Dementia Cases Are Preventable (psychcentral.com)

walterbyrd writes: The commission’s report identifies nine risk factors in early, mid- and late life that increase the likelihood of developing dementia. About 35 percent of dementia — one in three cases — is attributable to these risk factors, the report says.

By increasing education in early life and addressing hearing loss, hypertension, and obesity in midlife, the incidence of dementia could be reduced by as much as 20 percent, combined.

In late life, stopping smoking, treating depression, increasing physical activity, increasing social contact, and managing diabetes could reduce the incidence of dementia by another 15 percent.

“The potential magnitude of the effect on dementia of reducing these risk factors is larger than we could ever imagine the effect that current, experimental medications could have,” Schneider says.

“Mitigating risk factors provides us a powerful way to reduce the global burden of dementia.”

Submission + - Users of React.JS software petition to change the license 1

mpol writes: The Apache Software Foundation issued a notice last weekend, indicating that it has added Facebook’s BSD+Patents license to its Category X list of disallowed licenses for Apache PMC members. This is the license that Facebook uses for most of its open source projects.

The RocksDB software project from Facebook already changed its license to a dual Apache 2 and GPL 2. Users are now petitioning on GitHub to have Facebook change the license of React.JS as well.

React.JS is a well-known and often used JavaScript Framework for frontend development. It is licensed as BSD + Patents. If you use React.JS and agreed to its license, and you decide to sue Facebook for patent issues, you are no longer allowed to use React.JS or any Facebook software released under this license.

Submission + - Somebody claims to have just downloaded SoundCloud's Entire Library (edm.com)

nielo writes: "The past couple of months have been filled with ups and downs for the "YouTube of Music". Reports initially claimed that SoundCloud would shut down in 50 days, until Chance The Rapper (hopefully!) saved the day. With the stream of contradicting reports we've been hearing, it's understandable to be doubtful of SoundCloud's future. What are we going to do if we can't listen to our favorite songs or mixes anymore? It's scary to think that thousands of hours of music could suddenly disappear with no way to recover it.

Enter /u/makemakemakemake. On the DataHorder subreddit, he posted a comment saying he downloaded the entire library. Yes, you read that correctly... the ENTIRE 900TB library. Think about it, that means literally every song on SoundCloud is on one man's hard drive. At 80Gb/s he claimed it took him just one weekend to collect the data."

Submission + - Chester Bennington, lead singer of Linkin Park, dead at 41 (telegraph.co.uk) 1

edx93 writes: Chester Bennington, the Linkin Park lead singer whose screeching vocals helped the rock-rap band become one of the most commercially successful acts in the 2000s, was found dead in his home near Los Angeles on Thursday, the Los Angeles County coroner said. He was 41.

He will be missed.

Submission + - Ubuntu 16.10 Reached End of Life

prisoninmate writes: From a Softpedia report:

"Today is the last day when the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) was supported by Canonical as the operating system now reached end of life, and it will no longer receive security and software updates. Dubbed by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth as the Yakkety Yak, Ubuntu 16.10 was launched on October 13, 2016, and it was a short-lived release that only received nine (9) months of support through kernel updates, bug fixes, and security patches for various components. Starting today, you should no longer use Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) on your personal computer, even if it's up-to-date. Why? Because, in time, it will become vulnerable to all sort of attacks as Canonical won't provide security and kernel updates for this release. Therefore, all users are urged to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) immediately using the instructions at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ZestyUpgrades."

Submission + - Apple Flies Top Privacy Executives Into Australia To Lobby Against Encryption (patentlyapple.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Last week Patently Apple posted a report titled "Australia proposed new Laws Compelling Companies like Facebook & Apple to Provide Access to Encrypted Messages." Days later, Australia's Prime Minister spoke about the encryption problem with the Australian press as noted in the video in our report. Now we're learning that Apple has flown in top executives to lobby Turnbull government on encryption laws. It sounds like a showdown is on the horizon. This is the second time this month that Apple has flown executives into Australia to lobby the government according to a Sydney publication. Apple executives met with Attorney-General George Brandis and senior staff in Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's office on Tuesday to discuss the company's concerns about the legal changes, which could see tech companies compelled to provide access to locked phones and third party messaging applications. Apple has argued in the meetings that as a starting point it does not want the updated laws to block tech companies from using encryption on their devices, nor for companies to have to provide decryption keys to allow access to secure communications. The company has argued that if it is compelled to provide a software "back door" into its phones to help law enforcement agencies catch criminals and terrorists, this would reduce the security for all users. It also says it has provided significant assistance to police agencies engaged in investigations, when asked.

Submission + - Judge rules that government can force Glassdoor to unmask anonymous users online (arstechnica.com)

pogopop77 writes: An appeals court will soon decide whether the US government can unmask anonymous users of Glassdoor—and the entire proceeding is set to happen in secret. Federal investigators sent a subpoena asking for the identities of more than 100 anonymous users of the business-review site Glassdoor, who apparently posted reviews of a company that's under investigation for potential fraud related to its contracting practices. The government later scaled back its demand to just eight users. Prosecutors believe these eight Glassdoor users are "third-party witnesses to certain business practices relevant to [the] investigation." The name of the company under investigation is redacted from all public briefs.

Comment Rad(ical)! (Score 2) 50

I was born without a thumb and with a tiny annoying useless thumb (couldn't move it due to lack of bones and muscles -- it was removed in 1984) as parts of my disabilities. Almost a decade later, I got a surgery to rotate my right hand's left non-thumb finger 90 degrees into a thumb. It was a success. I can use it for writing better, holding light cups, etc. However, it is not very strong. I still use my left untouched hand for heavier and stronger stuff. I didn't want to make a thumb for that hand for that reason. :)

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