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Comment The good and the opulent (Score 2) 441

This will cut down on house fires, which is certainly good.

It's also progress towards something I've wanted for decades: An automatic closet. When I get undressed I want to just toss my clothes at the closet and have it launder, dry, and fold or hang them as appropriate, hopefully doing it quietly enough to not bother my sleep.

I actually don't mind the cleaning and drying part - just a robot to put them away would be awesome.

Submission + - User-Made Patch Lets Owners of Next-Gen CPUs Install Updates on Windows 7 & (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: GitHub user Zeffy has created a patch that removes a limitation that Microsoft imposed on users of 7th generation processors, a limit that prevents users from receiving Windows updates if they still use Windows 7 and 8.1. This limitation was delivered through Windows Update KB4012218 (March 2017 Patch Tuesday) and has made many owners of Intel Kaby Lake and AMD Bristol Ridge CPUs very angry last week, as they weren't able to install any Windows updates.

Microsoft's move was controversial, but the company did its due diligence, and warned customers of its intention since January 2016, giving users enough time to update to Windows 10, move to a new OS, or downgrade their CPU, if they needed to remain on Windows 7 or 8.1 for various reasons.

When the April 2017 Patch Tuesday came around last week, GitHub user Zeffy finally had the chance to test four batch scripts he created in March, after the release of KB4012218. His scripts worked as intended by patching Windows DLL files, skipping the CPU version check, and delivering updates to Windows 7 and 8.1 computers running 7th generation CPUs.

Submission + - SPAM: Can Parents Sue If Their Kid Is Born With the 'Wrong' DNA?

randomErr writes: In a fascinating legal case out of Singapore, the country's Supreme Court ruled that this situation doesn't just constitute medical malpractice. The fertility clinic, the court recently ruled, must pay the parents 30% of upkeep costs for the child for a loss of 'genetic affinity.' In other words, the clinic must pay the parents' child support not only because they made a terrible medical mistake, but because the child didn't wind up with the right genes.

“It’s suggesting that the child itself has something wrong with it, genetically, and that it has monetary value attached to it,” Todd Kuiken, a senior research scholar with the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, told Gizmodo. “They attached damages to the genetic makeup of the child, rather than the mistake. That’s the part that makes it uncomfortable. This can take you in all sort of fucked up directions.”

Submission + - SPAM: If you want my attention, pay me

schwit1 writes: Napoleon famously told his generals, “Ask me for anything but time.” For me, it’s more like, “Ask me for anything but attention.” Or at least, be prepared to pay. It’s an idea whose time may have come.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Teenager arrested for 'swearing near pensioner' 1

oobayly writes: The Daily Telegraph reports that a Louisiana teenager has been arrested for swearing near 75 year old. According to the the Ouachita Parish Sheriff's Office the charge is for "DISTURBING THE PEACE / LANGUAGE/ Disorderly Conduct" and that:

While standing next to my 75 year-old complainant, Jared yelled the word "fuck" and clearly disturbed her peace.

As an outsider to the US — who is seriously envious of the 1st Amendment — how is this even an arrest-able office? Given that 43% Slashdot readers describe themselves as liberal/libertarian I doubt that many will support this — especially as Smith is only accused of shouting "fuck", not verbally abusing the lady — but is it likely the Sherif's office actually have a case?

Submission + - SPAM: Artificial intelligence is ripe for abuse, tech researcher warns

randomErr writes: As artificial intelligence becomes more powerful, people need to make sure it’s not used by authoritarian regimes to centralize power and target certain populations, Microsoft Research’s Kate Crawford warned on Sunday. “Just as we are seeing a step function increase in the spread of AI, something else is happening: the rise of ultra-nationalism, rightwing authoritarianism and fascism,” she said. All of these movements have shared characteristics, including the desire to centralize power, track populations, demonize outsiders and claim authority and neutrality without being accountable. Machine intelligence can be a powerful part of the power playbook, she said.

Comment Re:Vote Europa (Score 4, Interesting) 59

It's not the proximity of another moon that produces tidal forces. Just going around Saturn is enough to produce the stresses that induce heat. We can't match the heat output in our models yet because we don't have enough data on the composition of Enceladus or the size of it's ocean(s). We can't even characterize how much heat comes from nuclear decay in our own core; we're just guessing about other planets and moons. Some of Europa's heat comes from the high radiation and strong magnetic fields in the Jupiter system, so the accuracy of your claim that it's heat matches only tidal stresses is doubtful.

Submission + - The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI (technologyreview.com)

schwit1 writes: No one really knows how the most advanced algorithms do what they do. That could be a problem.

Last year, a strange self-driving car was released onto the quiet roads of Monmouth County, New Jersey. The experimental vehicle, developed by researchers at the chip maker Nvidia, didn’t look different from other autonomous cars, but it was unlike anything demonstrated by Google, Tesla, or General Motors, and it showed the rising power of artificial intelligence. The car didn’t follow a single instruction provided by an engineer or programmer. Instead, it relied entirely on an algorithm that had taught itself to drive by watching a human do it.

Getting a car to drive this way was an impressive feat. But it’s also a bit unsettling, since it isn’t completely clear how the car makes its decisions. Information from the vehicle’s sensors goes straight into a huge network of artificial neurons that process the data and then deliver the commands required to operate the steering wheel, the brakes, and other systems. The result seems to match the responses you’d expect from a human driver. But what if one day it did something unexpected—crashed into a tree, or sat at a green light? As things stand now, it might be difficult to find out why. The system is so complicated that even the engineers who designed it may struggle to isolate the reason for any single action. And you can’t ask it: there is no obvious way to design such a system so that it could always explain why it did what it did.

The mysterious mind of this vehicle points to a looming issue with artificial intelligence. The car’s underlying AI technology, known as deep learning, has proved very powerful at solving problems in recent years, and it has been widely deployed for tasks like image captioning, voice recognition, and language translation. There is now hope that the same techniques will be able to diagnose deadly diseases, make million-dollar trading decisions, and do countless other things to transform whole industries.

But this won’t happen—or shouldn’t happen—unless we find ways of making techniques like deep learning more understandable to their creators and accountable to their users. Otherwise it will be hard to predict when failures might occur—and it’s inevitable they will. That’s one reason Nvidia’s car is still experimental.

To be fair, we don’t really understand how natural intelligence works, either.

Comment Re:What if you don't dream? (Score 1, Informative) 86

Dream recall directly correlates with how much zinc and b6 you get in your diet. b6 is water soluble, zinc needs to build up a serum level. Funny thing; cum is high in zinc, and most men on western diets are deficient in zinc. I know in my teens and twenties I put out LOTS of cum on a daily basis, enough to rival most girls monthly periods, yet all the hype about women getting enuf iron never mentions men getting zinc. Try taking 50mgs of b6 and 30mgs of Zn for a week or so. Take them at lunchtime, not just before bed. You may be surprised. I admit it may have been psychosomatic, but the first time I took them I had so many dreams the next morning felt like it was 3 days later.

Submission + - Draw-on circuit technology creates radical possibilities for flexible gadgets (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: Who said pen and paper was dead? German scientists have developed a new type of ink that allows fully-functioning electronic circuits to be 'written' directly onto a surface from a pen. The technology could provide an inexpensive means of manufacturing printed circuits suitable for flexible smartphones, tablets and other radical gadget designs.

The circuits are ready to be used as soon as the ink dries and requires no additional processing, claim researchers from the Leibniz Institute for New Materials (INM).

Printed electronics are usually created through a process called 'sintering', whereby powdered metals are heated to form conductive electric circuits. Sintering is used to remove organic materials and fuse metal components in electronic inks, but because of the heat involved it can damage materials that are sensitive to high temperatures – for example paper and certain types of plastic.

The new hybrid inks remove the need for sintering altogether, allowing the electronics to quite literally be drawn on to the material.

Submission + - Second Opinion From Doctor Nets Different Diagnosis 88% Of Time, Study Finds (studyfinds.org) 3

schwit1 writes: When it comes to treating a serious illness, two brains are better than one. A new study finds that nearly 9 in 10 people who go for a second opinion after seeing a doctor are likely to leave with a refined or new diagnosis from what they were first told.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic examined 286 patient records of individuals who had decided to consult a second opinion, hoping to determine whether being referred to a second specialist impacted one's likelihood of receiving an accurate diagnosis.

The study, conducted using records of patients referred to the Mayo Clinic's General Internal Medicine Division over a two-year period, ultimately found that when consulting a second opinion, the physician only confirmed the original diagnosis 12 percent of the time.

Among those with updated diagnoses, 66% received a refined or redefined diagnosis, while 21% were diagnosed with something completely different than what their first physician concluded.

Submission + - New Destructive Malware Intentionally Bricks IoT Devices (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A new malware strain called BrickerBot is intentionally bricking Internet of Things (IoT) devices around the world by corrupting their flash storage capability and reconfiguring kernel parameters in order to one single processing thread. The malware spreads by launching brute-force attacks on IoT (BusyBox-based) devices with open Telnet ports. After BrickerBot attacks, device owners often have to reinstall the device's firmware, or in some cases, replace the device entirely.

Attacks started on March 20, and two versions have been seen. One malware strain launches attacks from hijacked Ubiquiti devices, while the second, more advanced, is hidden behind Tor exit nodes. Several security researchers believe this is the work of an Internet vigilante fed up with the amount of insecure IoT devices connected to the Internet and used for DDoS attacks.

"Wow. That's pretty nasty," said Cybereason security researcher Amit Serper after Bleeping Computer showed him Radware's security alert. "They're just bricking it for the sake of bricking it. [They're] deliberately destroying the device."

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