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Submission + - Beloved Pippi Longstocking Books Charged With Racism (theguardian.com) 7

cdreimer writes: According to The Guardian: "Astrid Lindgren's much-loved books about Pippi Longstocking, she of the red hair, incredible strength and impossible lies, have been described as racist by a German theologian. Dr Eske Wollrad, a feminist theologian from Germany's Federal Association of Evangelical Women, has claimed that Lindgren's classic children's novels "have colonial racist stereotypes". In Pippi in the South Seas, "the black children throw themselves into the sand in front of the white children in the book," she told German paper the Local. "When reading the book to my nephew, who is black, I simply left that passage out." Wollrad neglected to mention that Pippi goes on to mock white children for their obsession with school. "If you come across a white child crying you can be pretty sure that the school has either gone up in flames, or that a half-term holiday has broken out, or that the teacher has forgotten to set homework for the children in pluttification," she says. The Pippi Longstocking books were written by Lindgren in the 1940s, covering the adventures of Pippi, an inveterate liar and eccentric whose parents are dead and who shares her house with a monkey and a horse who lives on the porch."

Comment Fiber is dead, all hail our cableco masters! (Score 5, Insightful) 71

I knew when Verizon stopped pushing FIOS that fiber was dead. Google loves splashy launches, but they quickly grow tired of anything involving day-to-day maintenance and long-term commitments. Google has the attention span of a methed-up squirrel.

On the upside, cablecos are now the only option for high speed internet for most people in the U.S. And they have pretty much unbreakable monopolies. Isn't that WONDERFUL?
 

Submission + - UK age checks on porn sites:the UK government doesn't understand the web (betanews.com)

Mark Wilson writes: If there's anything that the UK government has demonstrated in recent years it is that it not only wants to try to take control of the web, but it also fails to understand the web. These two facts make for a terrible combination — something highlighted by the snooper's charter and the government's desire to break encryption on demand.

The latest idea — ushered in under the guise of protecting children in a bid to win points — is the introduction of age restriction on porn sites. The Digital Economy Act will require porn sites to use credit card verification to check that users are aged 18 or over. There are numerous holes here, illustrating that the government simply doesn’t know what it's talking about.

Comment Re:Jodie Whittaker (Score 4, Insightful) 508

I just hope Dr. Who treats her as an actual Doctor, not just use her to virtue-signal for SJW cred. Dr. Who's increasing politicization is really getting annoying. It's starting to feel like that guy who brings out his one black friend at every party and points to him to let you know that he's a proper non-racist liberal.

When characters are naturally gay or black or whatever, that's great. When they're one-dimensional non-entities who just appear from stage-left in every episode just to remind everyone of their gayness and blackness, that's just virtue-signalling. And it's an insult to real gays, minorities, women etc. who are actual real human beings.

I hope she's a real character. I hope that every episode doesn't revolve around some stereotypical "women's issues" just to trumpet for the thousandth time that this Dr. Who is A WOMAN.

Submission + - 13th Doctor Who ill be female (bbc.co.uk) 1

Coisiche writes: It's undoubtedly going to be a controversial decision but the 13th incarnation of Doctor Who will be portrayed by an actress who will make her debut in this year's Christmas special.

I think the BBC may have underestimated the outrage they will face.

Submission + - Quit Your Job for a Better One? Not if You Live in Idaho (nytimes.com) 4

cdreimer writes: According to The New York Times: Idaho achieved a notable distinction last year: It became one of the hardest places in America for someone to quit a job for a better one. The state did this by making it easier for companies to enforce noncompete agreements, which prevent employees from leaving their company for a competitor. While its economy is known for agriculture — potatoes are among the state’s biggest exports — Idaho has a long history as a technology hub. And the new law landed in the middle of the tech world, causing a clash between hungry start-ups looking to poach employees and more established companies that want to lock their people in place. “We’re trying to build the tech ecosystem in Boise,” said George Mulhern, chief executive of Cradlepoint, a company here that makes routers and other networking equipment. “And anything that would make somebody not want to move here or start a company here is going to slow down our progress.”

Submission + - Coding: The New Vocationalism

theodp writes: "Goodbye to old vocational education preparing youth for jobs in an industrial economy," begins Stanford Professor Emeritus of Education Larry Cuban in Coding: The New Vocationalism. "Hello to the new vocational education of teaching coding and computer science to all U.S. students. Public schools have experienced two spasms of vocationally-driven reform. One created the 'old vocational education' in the early 20th century endorsed by the National Association of Manufacturers and now the 'new vocational education' a century later, endorsed by high-tech CEOs spreading the gospel for teaching children to learn to code and take computer science courses. Then and now, policymakers saw an intimate connection between a strong economy and strong schools." He adds, "The strong smell of Silicon Valley self-interest accompanies these proposals to improve schooling. Behind Code.org and other advocacy groups are the thick wallets of donors and technology companies carrying iconic names. In pushing state and local education officials to require computer science for high school graduation, classify the subject as a fourth 'science' in the secondary curriculum, substitute for a foreign language requirement, and have five year-olds learn to code wafts the scent of companies seeking graduates who can enter the computer and information workforce, a minute fraction of the entire U.S. workforce."

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