Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Awful lot of money for some big flaws... (Score 1) 37

Yes, the laminator melts the toner and makes it stick to the board. For a while I would just iron it on but that can be very tricky to do (hand pressure, etc).

I use a LaserJet 1200 which prints very nice thick toner traces.

My laminator is just a cheap one from walmart that I modified to run at a higher temperature. Even at the higher temperature I have to run the board through it 5 or 6 times (at different angles) to make sure all the toner gets stuck to the board. Pre-heating the board would probably make it require less passes but it works well enough without that. Higher-end laminators work better but of course cost a lot.

For printing I use glossy magazine paper (just pages torn out of old magazines) because it's very thin and falls apart/dissolves easily in soapy water leaving just the toner on the board. Some printers will jam when printing on this stuff but the LJ1200 works no problem.

Comment Re:Awful lot of money for some big flaws... (Score 4, Informative) 37

I use a laser printer, print on glossy magazine paper, put the paper toner-side-down on the PCB, run it through a high temp laminator, peal off the paper in soapy water, then etch. Takes almost no time and I can get very near professional results. I can do extremely tight small traces no problem.

I have never tried a double-sided board but I bet I could do it by simply printing the circuit such that the paper could be folded over the PCB then the laminator would stick both sides. Probably be difficult to do but not impossible.

Google

Google+ Redesigned (blogspot.com) 91

An anonymous reader writes: Google has announced that its Google+ social network has received a major overhaul, which is rolling out today to users who opt in. The company says the new design focuses on the "Communities" and "Collections" sections of Google+, since those were the ones most well received by users. "[Product Director Luke] Wroblewski, known for his responsive and progressive design work, tells me that the key to this rollout is the consistent, mobile first experience that hasn't historically been a hallmark of G+." The article describes the new experience thus: "As you click through the new Google+ there is a lighter feel to it for sure. It's a product with more purpose, as before it felt like there was a million things flying at you. Notifications, +1's, share buttons. You were pretty much sharing things into a pit and hoping that Google would do fun things with them."

Comment Re:Do you know how far bullets fly? (Score 1) 620

My yard has 6 other yards along the borders. Am I not allowed to fly my "drone"* in my own yard? Because it's certainly visible below the tree line by lots of people in the area. Legally I'm allowed up to 100 feet (due to proximity to airports) in my own yard. If I'm just out sport flying in the back yard and someone shot my "drone" down I would be fucking pissed. Not only for damage but danger to myself and family.

If I where hovering at say 50 feet over my yard it would be easy to mistake it as a drone with a camera "spying" or something that someone might want to take a shot at because they can't tell who is flying it or exactly over what land. Despite me being 100% legal and not even capable of spying on anything.

(*) It's just a regular acrobatic/sport multirotor, doesn't even have a camera on it

Comment Re:Why should? (Score 1) 397

Death by airplane is "someone else's" fault. Death in a car is my fault. Even if someone else was negligent, it's still my responsibility to compensate for their idiocy. This is the Merican way. Personal freedom, choice, control, and consequences. I deal with this every day as a motorcycle rider (the ultimate in personal control and consequences).

The simple fact is, on a commercial air-flight you have absolutely no control whatsoever over your death. As a driver of a car, you do, even if it's someone else's fault. In other words, flying on a commercial airplane requires no skill, driving a vehicle does.

Comment Re:Restricting vitamin D production: not a good id (Score 1) 210

10-15 minutes is no where near enough for most people with darker skin (ie. most of the world's population). I mean, fuck, I'm only olive skinned and I need at least 30 minutes to an hour at the most "dangerous" UV exposure at the highest levels to even begin to get the benefits. I don't start to get red skin until an hour or two and that's with no previous exposure (ie. coming out of winter). In the summer I can withstand 4 to 6 hours without my skin becoming red and 8 to 10 hours before I start to "burn". Darker complications have even longer times.

I assume by the moderation that most of slashdot is made up of minority pasty white cave-dweller homebodies with brain-damage caused by vitamin D and/or B12 deficiency. You are the abnormal outliers.

Thank you very much, dorks. There is a reason you're the outliers of the human race; please don't lock me in a cell and drain my superior blood for your nefarious purposes due to your weak genes, assholes.

Comment While I doubt the seriousness of the claims here.. (Score 0, Troll) 588

While I doubt the seriousness of the claims here... I can understand. I can feel any 2.4 ghz radiation and some other radiation like Wacom devices (not sure what frequency they use). I have done blind tests and can scientifically prove without doubt that I can feel 2.4 ghz radiation with 100% accuracy. It feels like vibration in my nerves. It's actually kind of freaky. I have to be within an inch or two of the typical low-power radiation source to feel it though. I have to put my phone far enough away from my body (not that far) at night so that I can sleep.

Does this cause "sickness"? Well, who knows. All I do know is that 2.4 ghz radiation does without doubt interact with human tissue (and probably all water-based material). Does it affect most people? Probably not in any way. Could it cause cancer/whatever? Maybe, otherwise I wouldn't be able to actively detect it and I'm sure there are people more sensitive than me.

And yes, I'm completely willing to submit to any test anyone wants to perform. I have done so many times so far and they're always surprised that my sensory disorder is real. Yet somehow this never makes the news (I wonder why?). :/ Welcome to the life of an outlier.

Google

Gmail Messages Can Now Self-Destruct 204

New submitter Amarjeet Singh writes: Dmail is a Chrome extension developed by the people behind Delicious, the social bookmarking app/extension. This extension allows you to set a self-destruct timer on your emails. You can use Dmail to send emails from Gmail as usual, but you will now have a button which can set an self destruct timer of an hour, a day or a week. Dmail claims it will also unlock a feature that won't allow forwarding, meaning only the person you sent your message to will be able to see it.
Transportation

Supersonic Jet Could Fly NYC To London In 3 Hours 238

An anonymous reader writes: A new supersonic luxury plane that could fly people from New York to London in just three hours is being developed by a team of engineers. Spike Aerospace's S-512 Supersonic Jet was introduced in 2013, but the company recently announced a few updates to the plane's design. Discovery reports: "Spike Aerospace's engineers claim the S-512 could reach a maximum speed of Mach 1.8 (1,370 mph, or 2,205 km/h), which is 1.8 times the speed of sound. For comparison, the fastest Boeing 747 commercial "jumbo jet" can reach a maximum speed of Mach 0.92 (700 mph, or 1,126 km/h). If the S-512 really is built to reach these supersonic speeds, it would be as fast as an F-18 Hornet, a military fighter jet with a max speed of Mach 1.8. This would also make the supersonic jet about 450 mph (724 km/h) faster than the fastest civilian jet, according to Spike Aerospace."
Biotech

Video Help Save Endangered Rhinos by Making Artificial Horns (Video) 202

Black Rhinoceros horn material sells for $65,000 per kilo. The rhinos are rare, which helps up the price, but the horn is also prized "as a fever-reducer, a cosmetic, an aphrodisiac, a hangover care. And so people highly value it in the Vietnamese and Chinese cultures. So we are trying to reduce that value by increasing the supply," says Jennifer Kaehms of Pembient, a company that's working to make artificial rhino horns that are not only chemically indistinguishable from the natural variety, but are 3-D printed to look the same. The idea is that if they can flood the market with human-made rhino horns, it will cut poaching -- which is a big deal because there are only about 5,000 black rhinos left in the whole world.

They have a crowdfunding appeal on experiment.com looking for help in sequencing the black rhino genome. At this writing, it has two days to run and has only raised $12,831 of its $16,500 goal. The results will be open sourced, and once the black rhino is on its way to salvation, they plan to work on the white rhino, then move on to killing the black market for ivory and tiger pelts, which don't sell for as much as rhino horns but are valuable enough to keep an international horde of poachers in business.

Slashdot Top Deals

Gee, Toto, I don't think we're in Kansas anymore.

Working...