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The Internet

Submission + - omnomnom browser history (uwaterloo.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: What does your browser history look like when visualized? An awkward question for many ofhttp://slashdot.org/submit.pl us to be sure. A new open source project, web2.0collage.com, aims to answer this question using browser history sniffing. When you visit the page, using a combination of javascript & scheme code, it determine your browser history, fetches the icon's associated with them and combines it into a collage. Before you get too worried about visiting the site, uses a white-list of safe-for-work sites :) For those interested the AGPL'd code is only a click away.
Privacy

Submission + - Generating Meta-collages from browser history

bobdole3k writes: With some simple javascript & scheme code (under the AGPL) its possible to sniff a users browser history. A new browser history sniffing site uses this to generate a collage of the sites you visit. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot/blogging habits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, the collage also serves as a cool illustration of the privacy concerns surrounding browser history sniffing.
Privacy

Submission + - Browser history sniffing illustrated

Anonymous Pants writes: A new open-source website, Web2.0 Collage, illustrates just how easy browser sniffing is. Once it's gotten a list of all the sites you visit it constructs a (somewhat creepy) collage graphically illustrating the websites you visit. Depending on your browser history the results can be nifty or creepy (fortunately it does use a filtered SFW list). While the results on it own are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
Security

Submission + - Website hijacks browser history & makes collag

itsamemario writes: With some basic javascript its possible to sniff a users browser history. A new browser history sniffing site uses this to generate a collage of the sites you visit. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot/blogging habits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
The Internet

Submission + - Browser sniffing ninjas

tasteyf00dninja writes: web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning & explanation screen and go straight to the browser history sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
Security

Submission + - The art of browser history sniffing

An anonymous reader writes: There is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Collages of sniffed browser history for !privacy

hkarau writes: web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and then creates a collage of them. While the collage is kind of nifty, it also graphically illustrates just how easy it is for people to sniff your browser history. Before you get too worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habits). However, just because these people play nice is no guarantee that everyone else will. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmark-lets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even hr site) implications or troublesome. An interesting application of potentially scary technology.
Networking

Submission + - Rackspace is down (zeitbyte.com)

golem1313 writes: Rackspace went down some time around 4:20PM EST. Their site is down, their client portal is down and their phone system has been busy for the last 15 minutes. They have been doing work on the power supply at one of their facilities for the last couple of days. Is this some twisted moment of silence for the Michael Jackson. Fanactical!!
The Internet

Submission + - Sniffing browser history for art

holdenkarau writes: "You may remember previous slashdot discussions on browser history sniffing, but there is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. web2.0collage.com uses similar browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - web2.0collage uses sniffed browser history for art

An anonymous reader writes: web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit (that has been discussed on slashdot before) and then creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology.
Education

Submission + - 'Microsoft Subsidy' Cuts Tuition for H-1B Families

theodp writes: "If you're a U.S. citizen, but not a permanent resident of Washington State, your kids will pay $24,367-a-year (pdf) if they want to attend the University of Washington. But if you're in the U.S. on a temporary H-1B or L visa, you, your spouse, and your kids will soon be able to pay only $7,692-a-year to attend UW thanks to HB 1487, which has been dubbed the 'Microsoft Subsidy Bill'. Sponsored by former Microsoft exec Ross Hunter, the bill stands to benefit the families of thousands of Microsoft workers. Lydia Tamez — associate general counsel and director of global migration at Microsoft — defended the bill, explaining that it will not only make life easier for H-1B employees who rely on Microsoft for their sole income, but also address the concerns of Microsoft guest workers who want to earn MBAs or second degrees, but balk at having to pay out-of-state tuition rates. Not all are impressed by her argument. The 'emergency' law (deja vu, anyone?), which legislators deemed 'necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions,' takes effect on July 1."
Cellphones

Submission + - Devicescape supports Starbucks with OpenMoko

An anonymous reader writes: The OpenMoko is getting some much needed love with Devicescape's port to the FreeRunner adding support for logins to Starbucks. With the ongoing port of Android to the FreeRunner some questions remain as to the long term viability of the freesmartphone architecture. (fittingly the captcha for the submission was muffin, similar to cupcake)
Operating Systems

The Economist Suggests Linux For Netbooks 445

Trepidity writes "In its roundup of how to choose a netbook, The Economist suggests that users 'avoid the temptation' to go for a Windows-based netbook, and in particular to treat them as mini laptops on which you'll install a range of apps. In their view, by the time you add the specs needed to run Windows and Windows apps effectively, you might as well have just bought a smallish laptop. Instead, they suggest the sweet spot is ultra-lite, Linux-based netbooks, with a focus on pre-installed software that caters to common tasks. They particularly like OpenOffice, which they rate as easier to use than MS Word and having 'no compatibility problems,' as well as various photo-management software." Besides which, does Windows offer spinning cubes for coffee-shop demos?
Security

Submission + - Yahoo! Zimbra Desktop vulnerable to MiTM

holdenkarau writes: "After patching the its plaintext authentication gaffe, Yahoo! Zimbra desktop has hit another stumbling block in the security road. Yahoo! Zimbra now uses the standard authentication method used by the rest of the Yahoo! Mail family. However, unlike other implementations where invalid SSL certificates will throw up plenty of warnings for the user, Yahoo! Zimbra Desktop is trivially vulnerable to a man-in-the-middle attack, as it simply transmits the usernames & passwords regardless of who's picked up on the other side. With all of the news about DNS vulnerabilities, this seems like exceptionally poor timing for a MiTM. For the time being you may wish to switch to using the Yahoo! webmail interface, until this bug gets fixed."
Books

Amazon Kindle Endorsed By Oprah 197

Oprah Winfrey enthused about the Amazon Kindle on her show today — it's her "new favorite thing" — and had Jeff Bezos on to announce a $50-off offer good till Nov. 1. A plug on Oprah is ordinarily a sign that a product has crossed over into the mainstream. But her show's audience has been slipping lately, and it's unclear how many cash-strapped citizens will be willing to part with $309 (after the special offer) for a new techno-gadget, for which they then have to shell out more money for DRM-encrusted content.

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