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Social Networks

Submission + - Roughly 3 out of 4 Tweets ignored (networkworld.com) 2

alphadogg writes: Social media analytics company Sysomos studied 1.2 billion Twitter posts made over the past 2 months and found that 71% elicited neither a retweet nor reply.

"When a tweet generates a reply (aka @) or a retweet (aka RT), it suggests the tweet has resonated enough with someone that it sparks a conversation or encourages someone to share it with their followers," the company writes. http://sysomos.com/insidetwitter/engagement/

Of course this doesn't consider that lots of people read or view content — on Twitter and in other forms of media — and don't necessarily feel compelled to respond.

According to the Sysomos study, just 6% of Tweets measured got retweeted and 23% were apparently intriguing enough to warrant a reply.

Facebook

Submission + - Facebook introduces one-time passwords (goodgearguide.com.au) 4

angry tapir writes: "Worried about logging into Facebook from a strange computer? There's now a way to get into the popular social network without entering your regular Facebook password. It's called a temporary password. To use it, users must list their mobile phone numbers with their Facebook accounts. They can then text a number from their phones and Facebook sends back a temporary password that is good for 20 minutes. The service will be available worldwide in the next few weeks."

Comment Re:Some more math-specific ideas (Score 1) 283

This is a good list. If for one, it shows that the original author might look beyond the boundaries of libraries written in C++. I personally would recommend numpy (http://www.numpy.org) because I've been doing mostly python coding in the last few years. Also, to note, that some/most of the backend to numpy is written in C.

However, if the submitter really wants to start contributing to open source libraries, they really should start at writing test cases and documentation. Contributing code to them is not something that maintainers usually like to take from people that are not associated with the project. Joining the mailing list was a good idea, but they really should download the code and run the set of test cases. Then, knowing what he knows, look into his area of expertise and see if there is test coverage he could add.

In summary, look into an alternate programming language library, download and run the library's test cases and fill in the test case coverage and write it up in their documentation.

Comment Re:iOS is woefully behind on ease of use? (Score 1) 176

and all of them stays in alphabetical order in the menu, which makes finding an app much more easier

swipe to the left on the home iOS screen, type in the first letter of the application you want into the search box... and Spotlight will bring up a list of applications starting with that letter.

They all do the same stuff, albeit in slightly different ways.

Comment Re:Wrong, this is not a branding case. (Score 1) 341

the question then becomes, what is meant by a "complete implementation" of java?

I mean, why did they not sue projects like blackdown and other open JVMs that were not 100% implemented? I understand that the Android Dalvik is not a "JVM", but the question remains: what is a "complete implementation"?

Comment Re:Amazon and B&N readers give it good reviews (Score 1) 186

I am very much the same way. I've read a lot of science fiction and fantasy, to the point where I'll try anything that someone recommends. The problem is that I can't always keep track of /what/ I've read. Oftentimes, I get a book... get to like page 25 and realize that I've read it before sometime in my youth. I had no idea when i picked it up, but when the plot and characters are starting to be developed, my brain remembers it.

P.S. I hope that you have read Joe Abercrombie's series, Rothfuss "Name of the Wind" (only first book out, good good stuff), and Brent Week's Nightangel Trilogy. They are all under related books at Amazon, and they are all awesomely rad.

Comment Re:"Epic Fail?" "Ownage?" (Score 1) 63

Fourteen year olds aren't creative enough to make up those type of words. They are knowledgeable enough to pick up on them though, and re-use the extensions of human textual speech that security experts, hipsters, and 30 year old MMO veterans create.

A lot of people that speak like that are adults. Everyone that makes up the memes are adults.

Comment Re:Meh. (Score 1) 993

His point stands. The larger laptop is heavier and bulkier.

This is disregarding the fact that the things that the macbook beats the hp in (processor speed, video card, etc.) you just ignore. Without a conclusion explanation, I am not really certain how you came to determine that your 17" hp has the "exact specs" as the macbook.

Go the opposite way: look at the $999 macbook and see if you can find a machine that is comparable.

You won't.

Comment Re:Wisdom of the Commons is Overrated (Score 2, Insightful) 198

Proper grammar, spelling and punctuation really go a long way to informing a reader about the subject. With those three things, along with logical paragraph break-down in a semi-lengthy on-topic reply you are usually going to get moderated up.

Presentation counts for a lot, especially on topics that are complex and not completely understood by the main-stream reader. I understand that content trumps presentation, but I'd much rather read a eloquent post about something that leads me to become more interested in a topic (even if not 100% correct) than non-knowable gibberish that is technically spot-on.

Those wrongly-informated +5s usually are well written. Well written posts are hard to down-rate.

Comment Re:RedHat is a dead end (Score 3, Interesting) 199

The problem is that people like me install Ubuntu on thier home desktop machine. I understand apt and all of the debian specific configuration file locations.

When I go into work and have to work on the RHEL servers, I can mostly get yum and rpms to work for the server configuration that I want, but god damn if it isn't like pulling teeth.

Now that I have enough power, and I have to make a decision on which distro to get support from, do I go with something that I know (Debian/Ubuntu and Canonical?) or something that is similiar yet foreign (Redhat/RHEL)?

The last 3 servers that I've been in control of have been Ubuntu.

Sun Microsystems

Sun to Add GPLv3 to OpenSolaris? 118

An anonymous reader writes to mention that sources inside Sun Microsystems claim that OpenSolaris may see the GPLv3 added to its list of licenses soon. From the article: "While Sun officials would not confirm the plan to dual-license OpenSolaris under the CDDL and GPLv3, Tom Goguen, vice president of Solaris software at Sun, told eWEEK that other open-source technologies will play a big role in Solaris going forward. 'Take the GNU Userland, which is an interesting piece of technology that Sun is looking at closely, and we may do something similar with, say, a container flavor,' he said. 'You can also expect to see a renewed focus on the needs of developers and system administrators with Solaris going forward, while individual pieces of the next version will also likely be increasingly delivered first as components or technologies targeted at vertical markets,' he said."

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