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Software

Submission + - US Court Rules Software Patents Invalid (itexaminer.com) 1

Corrado writes: "WooHoo!! It looks like software patents may be a thing of the past, at least most of them. A story over at IT Examiner has a great overview of how there will be specific testing procedures to determine how patentable a process is and how this decision is almost a complete reversal of the State Street Bank judgement of 1998. Of course, more details can be found over at Groklaw. I'm guessing Amazon is not real happy right about now — One Click Purchasing anyone?"

Feed Engadget: iPod touch 2G - first hands-on (engadget.com)

Filed under: Portable Audio, Portable Video


digg_url = 'http://digg.com/apple/iPod_touch_2G_first_hands_on'; We just got some hands-on time with the new iPod touch, and we're really feeling this one. Jury's still out on the new nano, but the second-gen touch is a marked improvement over the first gen model. The WiFi antenna looks much better integrated, the speaker doesn't sound like complete trash despite not even having any speaker holes, and the thing is crazy thin. Like, really, really thin.

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Security

Submission + - Yubikey (yubico.com)

Corrado writes: "Yubico has developed a hardware based security token that looks very promising. Its essentially a single key USB keyboard with a built-in RSA generator. Plug it into your USB port, touch the top "button" and it will output a 48 byte string that contains a unique ID + some random data. This is sent to a server (initially inside Yubico) to be decoded and converted into a security token that can be used in various ways. As of right now it allows you to log into Windows, ActiveDirectory and various Web 2.0 applications including OpenID. But there is an SDK and you can hook it into your own apps. The most exciting news by far is that the entire thing is completely open source and you can run your own Yubikey server if you wish!"
Businesses

Submission + - Priming the markets for tomorrow's big crash (harpers.org)

Corrado writes: "Harper's Magazine has a great article on the financial "bubbles" of the past, present, and future. It starts off explaining how the Great Depression was started and how it relates to the Internet Bubble of 2000 and the current Housing troubles. I'm not a finance type of person and yet I was able to understand the content of this article and it really helped me to realize the trouble we're in. If you don't quite know whats going on today and you want to be informed about tomorrow this article is your friend."
Networking

Submission + - Beating AVG's fake traffic spew (theregister.co.uk)

Corrado writes: "Remember how AVG started spamming the Internet by pre-checking pages for virus? Well, now it looks like there is a way to filter out all the fake IE6 traffic; at least temporarily. AVG say they are working on the issue and will have a fix soon, but until then you can use this info to clean up your logs and maybe even head off some of the useless load on your site."
Role Playing (Games)

Submission + - Blizzard's EULA compliant WoW spyware (rootkit.com)

Corrado writes: "rootkit has a fairly good look at the "warden client" that comes with every copy of World of Warcraft. Apparently, this little piece of software is very liberal in what it does to your computer and gathers quite a bit of data. Every 15 seconds it looks at all your open windows, every process, URLs, IMs, etc. and checks to see if your cheating. This feels like a massive invasion of privacy and its all perfectly legal through the WoW EULA."
Operating Systems

Submission + - Removing the Big Kernel Lock (kerneltrap.org)

Corrado writes: "Over at Kernel Trap there is a big discussion going on over removing a bit of non-preemptable code from the Linux kernel.

"As some of the latency junkies on lkml already know, commit 8e3e076 in v2.6.26-rc2 removed the preemptible BKL feature and made the Big Kernel Lock a spinlock and thus turned it into non-preemptible code again. This commit returned the BKL code to the 2.6.7 state of affairs in essence," began Ingo Molnar. He noted that this had a very negative effect on the real time kernel efforts, adding that Linux creator Linus Torvalds indicated the only acceptable way forward was to completely remove the BKL."

Microsoft

Submission + - Office 2007 Fails OOXML Test With 122,000 Errors (griffinbrown.co.uk)

I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes: "Groklaw is reporting that some people have decided to compare the OOXML schema to actual Microsoft Office 2007 documents. It won't surprise you to know that Office 2007 failed miserably. If you go by the strict OOXML schema, you get a 17 MiB file containing approximately 122,000 errors, and 'somewhat less' with the transitional OOXML schema. Most of the problems reportedly relate to the serialization/deserialization code. How many other fast-tracked ISO standards have no conforming implementations?"
Music

Submission + - Rock Band Footage (canada.com)

Corrado writes: "Just cruising around the web and I found some details and a video of the upcoming Rock Bank video game. Basically the video shows a team of 4 Harmonix engineers going through Welcome to the Jungle by GnR and it's awesome!"

Feed Apple toughens iPhone screen, boosts battery life (theregister.com)

Glass display to hinder scratches?

Apple has upped its claim for the iPhone's battery life, now saying the touchscreen smart phone will offer an eight-hour talk time. It's also decided to ship the machine with a glass front in a bid to beat the scratches spotted by so many early iPod Nano buyers.


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