Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re: Maybe it's because... (Score 1) 331

On the other hand though, I walk back my comments after seeing this post by Demena...

https://hardware.slashdot.org/...

"I bought mine (an Apple series 3) pretty much for retail therapy (being stupid is ok, if you are aware of and compensate for it) and there may be no killer app. But there is a lifesaving one. My watch woke me up when I was running a high fever (heartbeat too high). Doctor told me that if I had not called an ambulance when I did I would have not made it through the night. So, there may be no killer app but there is certainly one that saved my life."

So - if an iWatch will alert you to call a doc, it can be a good thing.

Comment Re: Maybe it's because... (Score 4, Insightful) 331

Ah, the build quality, of course. The low-capacity (and slightly-swollen) battery, PCB with tin whiskers, chipped bezel, unresponsive OS, temperamental Bluetooth, 'retired' cloud service, flaky sensors, compatibility issues with your hardware devices, tatty plastic band... All these add a degree of authenticity.

Comment How do I avoid information overload? I don't :-[ (Score 2) 133

But if I did, it'd take the form of a 'distributed intelligence agency' of devices and people that observed me, observed my interactions with the world, engaged me in conversation (and other devices and humans on my behalf), and then acted based on its perception of my need. Such actions would include filtering or augmenting my information flows (preferably, doing both). But of course, such a system would need to be controlled, and answerable, to me the user.

This is such a natural role for operating system vendors, its a wonder that Apple, Microsoft, Google, Fitbit, Amazon, Redhat, Omron, Arduino, KDE, etc, haven't cottoned onto it yet. Perhaps because building a 'society of intelligent agents' that acts in the best interests of the customer requires cooperating with 'the other'. And that is hard - both financially, and technically.

When that day comes around, my medical records, Fitbit history, readings from my home blood pressure monitor, locations from my mobile, credit card history -- all these would be brought together and 'digested'. I'd then be 'counselled' to eat healthy takeaway from WholeFoods, bypassing the PizzaHut I was walking towards. (Or not, as the case may be - I've had a stellar exercise week).

Unfortunately, commercial OS vendors and data providers are busy building or tending the walled gardens of their rent-seeking dreams. So the API hooks this 'Society of the Mind' intelligence agency requires aren't available. Until that comes to pass, we're stuck entering data into our own life.

Comment Re:Take their argument back a level.... (Score 1) 340

"...and then they'll probably get it."

Perhaps not. There's probably a reason behind the question -- human nature expects that if a tool solves one problem, you can reuse it to solve another. So a wrench which fixes the car will also work in the kitchen.

And Word's "compact visualizations of branched undo/redo histories" (which I doubt) functionality can be reused.

Probably a good time to bring up opensource. And maybe software patents, FRAND licensing and git visualization tools ... depending how far down the rabbit hole that conversation goes. :)

Comment Re: Intel: "Trust me!"... Again! (Score 1) 136

Well, isn't HDCP really someone else's computer *fully* determining what you see? If it encrypts the monitor's image stream, can't it modify it?

What if you've got an HDCP-protected YouTube stream playing in the background as you're logged on to Net-banking and then happen to click the browser's address bar? Could HDCP *hardware* insert a fake 're-enter your banking credentials' message and image-capture your password as it appears in the address bar? Remember "Reflections on trusting trust" and the Intel management engine vulnerability.

Comment Re: Come on, come on (Score 1) 307

40 hours of gameplay to unlock... 15-20 hours per week ... 10 hours per week ... 80+ hours per week. ... unlock one hero before the end of November ... one or two before Thanksgiving. ... two or three before Christmas

Wow. Just wow. And me, belonging to the idspispopd generation.

Comment Re: Come on, come on (Score 1) 307

40 hours of gameplay to unlock... 15-20 hours per week ... 10 hours per week ... 80+ hours per week. ... unlock one hero before the end of November ... one or two before Thanksgiving. ... two or three before Christmas

Wow. Just wow. And me, belonging to the idspispopd generation.

Comment My eyes glazed over... (Score 1) 134

...reading this post, I scrolled past. Until I thought "wait, interesting point". I scrolled up. Then down again, then back up, forcing myself to read the entire post.

He's right, of course. The problem is diminishing attention spans force authors to 'illustrate' their articles to grab attention -- the eye imbibes images faster than text. Sometimes it's well done -- the author went to upwork and commissioned original art by an artist -- sometimes not (stock images). Now attention spans are diminishing further, and people are shifting to video. The eye imbibes movement faster than art. Mark my words, stock video will soon be a thing for most articles.

The problem is attention isn't free. It's a limited resource. When surfing the unmediated web, we suffer information overload. That's why people prefer curated feeds like Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook. But again, those mediators really don't work for us -- their don't always have our best interests at heart. For that we need Intelligent Agents that are owned by you, and that work for you, curating and mediating your experience.

Slashdot Top Deals

If at first you don't succeed, you are running about average.

Working...