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Submission + - The myth of the eight-hour sleep. (bbc.co.uk)

antdude writes: Over an over year ago, BBC News did a(n) article/story on "The myth of the eight-hour sleep — We often worry about lying awake in the middle of the night — but it could be good for you. A growing body of evidence from both science and history suggests that the eight-hour sleep may be unnatural..."

Seen on Blue's News.

Submission + - Hijacking Airplanes with an Android Phone

An anonymous reader writes: Until today, hacking and hijacking planes by pressing a few buttons on an Android mobile app has been the stuff of over-the-top blockbuster movies, but the talk that security researcher and commercial airplane pilot Hugo Teso delivered today at the Hack in the Box conference in Amsterdam has brought it crashingly into the realm of reality and has given us one more thing to worry about and fear.

Submission + - Iran plans to launch an "Islamic Google Earth" (guardian.co.uk)

Shipwack writes: The Iranian authorities have long accused Google Earth of being a tool for western spy agencies, but now they have taken their attacks on the 3D mapping service one step further â" by planning the launch of an "Islamic" competitor.

Submission + - Germany Quadruples Energy Surplus in Past Two Years (inhabitat.com)

MikeChino writes: Germany's Federal Statistics Office just reported a surplus of 22.8 billion kilowatt hours over the last two years. While 46 percent of Germany’s power still comes from coal, in 2012 nearly 22 percent of the country’s electricity came from renewables — and the government has set a goal to source 80 percent of its electricity from green technology by 2050. Holland, Austria and Switzerland were the country’s main customers for the extra energy.

Submission + - UCSD first-person video game teaches kids to program in Java (scienceblog.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Computer scientists at the UC San Diego have created an immersive, first-person player video game meant to teach students in high school and below how to program in Java. The researchers tested the game on a group of 40 girls, ages 10 to 12, who had never been exposed to programming before. They found that within just one hour of play, the girls had mastered some of Java’s basic components and could use it to create new ways of playing with the game.

Submission + - Serious Vulnerabilities Found in Popular Cisco Home Wireless Routers

Trailrunner7 writes: A handful of vulnerabilities have been identified in the Cisco Linksys EA2700 Network Manager N600 Wireless-N routers, which has been on the market a little more than a year, and is a popular choice not only for home users, but for small businesses.

Pen-tester and researcher Phil Purviance, who has presented similar research at security industry events, reported his findings to Cisco on March 5. No patches are available yet.

His research looked at the administration features on the embedded management website. The vulnerabilities he found range in severity and simplicity to exploit.

A cross-site scripting bug was found on the router’s apply.cgi that works regardless of authentication and would allow an attacker to access the device, change settings or upload modified firmware.

Submission + - Navy to deploys lasers on ships in 2014 (foxnews.com)

Velcroman1 writes: The Pentagon has plans to deploy its first ever ship-mounted laser next year, a disruptive, cutting-edge weapon capable of obliterating small boats and unmanned aerial vehicles with a blast of infrared energy. Navy officials announced Monday that in early 2014, a solid-state laser prototype will be mounted to the fantail of the USS Ponce and sent to the 5th fleet region in the Middle East for real-world experience. "It operates much like a blowtorch ... with an unlimited magazine," one official said.

Submission + - Content Filtering Firewall options for the Home 1

MadCow42 writes: My kids are getting to the age of web surfing without my wife or I always hanging over their shoulder. Although they're still in the "innocent" phase (not for long!), it's time that I installed a better content filtering and firewall/spamwall/antivirus/anti-phishing solution on our (mostly wired) home network. I'm gravitating to an appliance-type solution and I'm not afraid to pay a small monthly fee for services if needed, but I'm also Linux capable and already have an Ubuntu server on my internal network (with things like Dansguardian/etc a possibility)... but I don't want to be spending hours manually updating and patching servers and block lists. What affordable solutions would the Slashdot crowd suggest?

Comment Re:The cellphone ban is overreaching, too (Score 2) 369

Seriously, if there was even an incremental risk that a powered on or active cellphone could cause a problem during a flight then they would not allow you to take them on the plane. They certainly wouldn't blindly trust people to follow the request given to turn the things off. That is just plain common sense. There is no risk at all, its simple bullshit, probably falling into the 'security theater' category.
I seem to recall John Dvorak writing an article maybe 10 or so years ago in which he theorized that the reason behind the ban was strictly accounting related. Something to do with the fact that someone on a call would switch towers too fast for calls to be tracked properly, and thusly billed properly. That makes a hell of a lot more sense to me.

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