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Comment Re:Won't solve a thing... (Score 1) 370

Oh, and pretty much every employer - especially large employers - are pushed to have all people (regardless of age, sex, etc) at a given position level to be within a certain spread. If you're in the upper end of the spread, then HR pushes for a promotion so they can keep the numbers relatively close together. If you're at the bottom of the spread, then HR pushes for pay raises. Essentially, the position might have a spread of $20k, but HR pushes to keep folks within $5-10k of each other.

But that brings about a problem. They force their good people out of what they're good at and into something like management because they exceed the salary range. This leads to their top talent leaving the company because not everyone wants to climb the corporate ladder or become management.

Sometimes an engineer just wants to be an engineer.

Yes, very true unless companies create a path for people to remain technical while still advancing. But it still puts in place a glass ceiling.

Comment Re:Employers do that? (Score 1) 370

How is an employer âoegiving you a raiseâ if you werenâ(TM)t already working for them? While the amount you might receive by starting work for a new employer may represent a large raise for you, as far as the employer is concerned, that is nothing more or less than your starting wage/salary. If itâ(TM)s a raise, itâ(TM)s a raise from $0, because thatâ(TM)s what they were paying you before.

Comment Re: Question on fuzzing (Score 1) 62

Depends on what you are testing. Fuzzing should target the layer you are interested in. If you want to test the application layer, then you have to make sure that at least the IP part of your fuzzed packets is correct, so your packets actually reach the application.

If on the other hand you are testing the ethernet driver, you could try to send random bits instead of ethernet frames to the interface.

Comment Re:Ban them from all PVP on Steam (Score 1) 184

To your point, 150 years ago, the penalty for stealing a horse or cattle was hanging, which is equivalent to stealing a car these days. I do think they had it right back then about the death penalty for rape and murder though. There are some lines which if you cross make you irredeemable and not worth keeping around for a chance at a repeat performance.

Comment Re:Ban them from all PVP on Steam (Score 1) 184

Effective cheat detection is key, I agree, and assumed in my earlier post, but your statement is patently false. If you have perfect capture rates (everyone who cheats is caught) but the only penalty is a warning email, no one who is cheating will stop. The penalty is a key part of discouraging cheating.

Comment Re:Won't solve a thing... (Score 1) 370

After you account for everything there is still a gap. It's smaller than the uncontrolled gap of course, but it's still a significant gap. Headline figure is 2.4%, which is equivalent to working nearly 9 days a year for free, and it's worse in some industries.

Detailed analysis: https://www.payscale.com/data-...

Q/A session that probably anticipates most of your rebuttals: https://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/...

Note however that the controlled gap, comparing like-for-like in terms of experience, time worked, age, education, children etc. doesn't tell the whole story. For women there is less opportunity to reach that same level and then get paid 2.4% less. Not just women either, it can affect men who are in some groups such as those with disabilities or who are widowed.

And yet you still fail to account for how individuals negotiate their priorities, etc. Some take lower pay on purpose in trade-off for other benefits - this is extremely true of many women, especially those that have children, and the others in the group you mentioned (those with disabilities or caring for someone elderly or with disabilities). As I said - once you take *all* the factors into play, there is *no* pay gap, or at least not one that is statistically significant.

Also, a 2.4% difference would fall within normative ranges deltas, and can be accounted for numerous things - from work-life balance to performance, etc.

As to opportunities - it's a matter of what you make of it. I've transitioned from being "at the office" to WFH. The opportunities for advancement have significantly changed as a result; yet it's a matter of what I do - how I engage, etc - both within my team, and within the company as a whole that makes the difference in advancement opportunities.

Comment Re:Ad company defends business model (Score 4, Insightful) 184

Company threatened by emergence of a new model of online compensation uses control over existing infrastructure to severely limit its penetration into the market.

Not really. Running a miner is not a way that legitimate content sites recover their cost of operation. It's a way to grab some of the viewer's cycles for mining without their knowing it. If you want viewers to pay for use of your site in CPU cycles, design a protocol for that which will tell the user what they're paying, and allow them to pay it fairly or inform their decision to stay off your site.

Comment Re: All together? (Score 1) 351

Note that for fedgov and affiliated companies, US-owned proprietary software source code may be available for review, custom compilation, etc.

Reviewing source is almost pointless. How do you know that you are looking at the real source code? Or all the source code? Or that you can really find hidden (obscured) untrustworthy code? Even if you build it yourself, you may not be totally safe.

Comment Won't solve a thing... (Score 2, Insightful) 370

Is there a theoretical gap in pay? Yes. However, when you look at the real numbers, it's quickly shown that the difference is because there is also a difference is time actually worked - IOW - a difference in experience levels, and once adjusted for that the gap goes away to within the normative ranges.

So yes, if you look at a man and a woman who are both 35 years old and say "oh, there's a $20k difference in their pay", but then...

- failed to account for work experience differences
- failed to account for time-off differences

Oh, and pretty much every employer - especially large employers - are pushed to have all people (regardless of age, sex, etc) at a given position level to be within a certain spread. If you're in the upper end of the spread, then HR pushes for a promotion so they can keep the numbers relatively close together. If you're at the bottom of the spread, then HR pushes for pay raises. Essentially, the position might have a spread of $20k, but HR pushes to keep folks within $5-10k of each other.

Still thing there's a gender pay gap? Take a look at the demographics of HR departments (it's highly skewed - opposite the general tech field).

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