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Comment Re:Either may be more profitable, but competition (Score 1) 95

(a) could show you had sufficient financial backing to be a viable concern

What are the common ways for startups to show (a)?

Show cash on hand, show borrowing capacity, show a business plan.

(b) agreed to cover at least a large portion of the city, if not all, and weren't just going to cherry-pick affluent neighborhoods

Is a franchisee allowed to propose a multi-year plan to cover "a large portion of the city", using revenue from one neighborhood to fund expansion into adjacent neighborhoods, or does it have to be at least borough-wide from day one?

It can be a phased rollout (don't need to have the entire network built to light it up), but reasonably rapid, and not just "attractive markets first." (can't say "we'll do Richguy Heights in 2016, and then 2% of Poverty Falls per year for the next 50 years").

Comment Re:Either may be more profitable, but competition (Score 1) 95

Those aren't franchise monopolies. Franchise monopolies have been illegal for around 20 years. FiOS doesn't violate cable monopoly rights because those rights don't exist, not because of the physical medium Verizon chose to use. You're absolutely right about the easements (and, more importantly, rights of way on public property). Again, if you want to start a competing service, you're welcome to do so, but the municipality won't just let you build what you want, where you want (i.e. you can't just cherry pick serving densely populated rich neighborhoods), just as the cable and Telco provider weren't allowed to only serve part of the municipality.

Comment Re:Either may be more profitable, but competition (Score 3, Insightful) 95

It's not illegal at all - how do you think Verizon is rolling out FiOS? If you wanted to launch the Raymorris Cable Company, and deploy service in NYC, you could certainly do so, provided you (a) could show you had sufficient financial backing to be a viable concern, and (b) agreed to cover at least a large portion of the city, if not all, and weren't just going to cherry-pick affluent neighborhoods.

Comment Re:Old Media = HRC and Trump (Score 1) 213

Just about all non-conservative people under 40 supported Sanders over Clinton

I don't have data handy with a +/-40 break point, but while Sanders did dominate in 18-24 (65/27), 24-34 was essentially tied (45/44), and Clinton won handily 35-44 (54/34). So, overall, Sanders probably had an edge for under 40 as a whole, but it's around 55/45, not "just about all". http://www.vox.com/2016/1/15/1...

Comment Seems Reasonable (Score 1) 534

Facebook's in the business of selling ads. If they keep adblockers from working, then some people will just put up with the ads, and some people will stop using Facebook. I bet the second group is actually pretty darn small (/. readers are HIGHLY non-representative of the population as a whole), and, since they aren't generating any revenue for FB, I don't think they'll be crushed to see them go.

Comment Re:Not a great headline (Score 1) 191

There have been restrictions based on calling, but there's general agreement that calling somebody is a form of speech, and deserves some form of protection, although by no means unlimited protection (hence you have the TCPA, the do-not-call list, etc.). The do-not-call list has held up thus far partly because it's limited generally to commercial calling, and commercial speech receives less protection, in general, than other kinds of speech.

Comment Not a great headline (Score 3, Informative) 191

The judge didn't rule that political robocalls couldn't be banned, but rather that you couldn't JUST ban political robocalls. Generally, content-based restrictions on speech face a much higher hurdle than form-based restrictions. If the law had banned ALL robocalls, it might still have been overturned, but by only trying to ban SOME robocalls, the law was banning speech based on its content (political vs. charity message), and that's a very tough hurdle to get over.

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