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Comment Re:Wow! (Score 1) 62

For extra money, you can get windmill electrons instead of normal electrons! This is totally not an accounting gimmick that means that you get the same electrons anyway, because the grid kind of, well, mixes and matches.

You're missing the point. Also, Microsoft is in the business of making money, so if the cost didn't work for their accountants, they wouldn't do it because the momentary Public Relations value is, well, momentary.

And, no one thinks they are getting "different" electrons. Your statement is meaningless blather about nothing.

Comment Re:No cord cutting in TFA (Score 4, Interesting) 62

No only that, but PSE is going to be stuck with the clean-up costs of the sites containing the coal-fired energy generation plants.

There is this:

The agreement calls for Microsoft to pay a $23.6âmillion transition fee to PSE, which the utility will pass on to its Western Washington customers.

A "transition fee"... What does this mean? They have to pay not use the utility? I'm not saying the fee is bad, just that the story doesn't say what this fee is for. Reading the actual agreement suggests that the costs of the Montana clean-up is still an open issue and will be litigated.

Now, Microsoft "dislike" aside, and for the sake of argument let's suppose it was some other big customer, why should they pay anything for the clean-up and shut-down of the Montana coal plant? Did Microsoft (or any other big customer) have some powerful say in the construction of this plant? A choice not to support it's use? Is there some compelling reason why Microsoft (or any other customer) should pay for Puget Sound Energy's ill-advised reliance on an energy resource that was almost certainly environmentally questionable when the plant was built?

Comment Re:No cord cutting in TFA (Score 2) 62

Maybe it's just me indeed. But, for me:
"cutting the cord" != having your provider setup new gateways

Yes and no...

to end your connection with someone, OR to stop depending on their support

http://www.macmillandictionary...

Synonyms include: "finish with" a relationship, which may or may not include all components of the relationship. So there would be several possibilities including Microsoft setting up a giant wind farm or tons of solar on their Redmond campus, or simply (as is the case) not buying energy from the local utility while still using the infrastructure.

But this raises a question: The huge one time payment not withstanding, it seems to me that even though they will purchase their energy from some other source, they still use the utility's wires, so there should be some continuing expense for the use of that infrastructure, shouldn't there be? I haven't read anything about that.

Comment Re:No cord cutting in TFA (Score 1) 62

There is no mention of "cord cutting" in TFA. The power company will just route "cleaner energy" to MS through the existing network.

You're being pedantic.

"Cutting the cord" is a phrase that means they will not be buying energy from the utility, which comes from a number of sources including coal and other "unsustainable" and dirty sources. Instead they will contract and buy from "green" sources that will then me routed into the pool of power that the utility then delivers to MS.

Seriously, think it through. :)

Comment Systemd: What Does It Solve? (Score 4, Interesting) 358

I am not questioning you opinions on systemd, particularly since my father, a retired CE and lifelong *nix user dislikes it with a passion. But I'm way to ignorant of the dirty mechanics and politics of Linux to understand how, with so many presumably knowledgeable folks who dislike systemd, it became a standard in the more popular distros. Does it solve some vexing issue for the maintainers of these distros? What do these people find so compelling as to make such a fundamental change?

Submission + - Whole Foods deal sparks calls for Amazon antitrust scrutiny

Frosty Piss writes: Amazon.com’s expansion plans including recent plans to aquire Whole Foods for $13.7billion are drawing attention of Washington as well as Wall Street. Congressman David Cicilline, who sits on the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee, has called for hearings into the proposed merger saying "Competition is essential for a healthy economy. That’s true across the board. Amazon’s proposed purchase of Whole Foods could impact neighborhood grocery stores and hardworking consumers across America." Hedge-fund manager Doug Kass has taken a short position, saying government antitrust concerns will erode its value. "At the core of my concern is that the disruptive impact of Amazon’s growth (and plans) could lead to government restrictions affecting that growth," Kass told clients in an email. Amazon's purchase of the grocery retailer is expected to be completed later this year.

Submission + - Microsoft cuts cord with local utility to buy green

Frosty Piss writes: Microsoft will bypass Puget Sound Energy to secure carbon-free power on wholesale markets under an agreement with state regulators. The agreement calls for Microsoft to pay a $23.6million transition fee to Puget Sound Energy, which the utility will pass on to its Western Washington customers. In 2015, 60 percent of PSE electricity came from coal and natural-gas plants, according to company statistics. State regulators and Puget Sound Energy determined that Microsoft is legally responsible for a share of the Colstrip, Montana coal-fired generating plant costs. Microsoft seeks to secure its power from sources that emit no carbon emissions.

Comment Re:Paying for the Privilege of Being Bugged (Score 1) 166

I am not letting a corporation install bugging devices in my home, and I am sure as hell not going to pay for the privilege.

A good point that has, of course, been brought up many times. Given what we know from Snowden, there can be no question that the Three Letter Agencies are all over this.

Comment Re:No rock large enough to hide under.. (Score 1) 35

They should also seize personal assets from the CEO, high likelihood he is skating with millions of dollars made from this illegal behaviour over the past 5-years.

IANAL, but this is why both sleaze-bags and legit people alike incorporate, to avoid personal exposure. So unless there was calculated fraud that lead to actual losses, my *guess* (again, IANAL) is that creditors and wronged folks alike are SOL except for the lawyers perhaps, Everyone else will get a cupon for $1 off a Whopper at your choice of locations.

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