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Comment Re:HOWTO (Score 1) 1081

Yes, that was the most humane way mentioned in the documentary 'How to kill a human being'. The documentary had a British MP who set out to find out more about executions and how to do it more humanely. In the end the MP met with one of the death penalty supporters and proposed nitrous oxide as a better way to execute someone, but the death penalty supporter disagreed saying that he wants it to be as painful as possible. I wholeheartedly recommend watching this documentary to get a better idea of what really goes on when someone is executed.

Comment Re:HOWTO (Score 1) 1081

Depriving a person of a future is punishment. Someone who has decided to, and has murdered other people, and who wakes up each morning and has breakfast anyway, is definitely going to be punished by having all of his future days removed. Forcing the families of the people he's murdered to go to work each day to pay some taxes to keep alive, and feed breakfast to, the person who wrecked their lives - that is punishment for the victims.

Your advocating killing them for the reason of not paying a small tax burden? That is judging a life to be worth a pretty small amount, probably far less than the reasons the murderer had for killing someone.

Comment Re:Hurrah for science! (Score 1) 201

Contrary to what protestants in general, and American ones in particular, want to believe, this isn't usually enough by any means. You see, any major literary author or work, such as Shakespeare, requires a ton of research to be properly understood, so much so you have entire academic departments dedicated to properly analyzing them.

What a waste. It would be much better to put on an entertaining show based on those works.

What do people get out of this "understanding" anyway?

Comment Re:the interesting part of Berners-Lee's comment (Score 1) 151

The constitution explicitly says that congress can only allow patents to further progress.
So a patent that blocks critical progress in our society would mean that the law that allowed the patent is unconstitutional, no?

Sooo, only patents that can be worked around are constitutional, unless they're worthless, right? After all, society would still run without the "interactive web", you just wouldn't have nice things. I bet that the patent would have stood up in court if it had been enforced much earlier, when it was new and only a few people were using it.

Comment Re:Tempest in a teacup (Score 1) 332

Heh, they could just have a server that by default allows the DRM check to pass, and not have to worry about customer details for the time that the other server is offline. But no, they had to choose the horrible way to do it. Should be thinking twice about buying a game from these jokers, I mean other than the way they already treated their 'customers' up until this point.

Comment Re:Cue the lawsuits (Score 1) 424

As an outsider to the US, may I humbly suggest that as a start, an alternative voting system could be used, such as some sort of single transferable vote system. At least then citizens will not have to worry about wasting their vote.

If there is something wrong with my above statement, I would like to know. And yes, pigs may fly and all that.

Comment Re:Likely answer... (Score 2) 267

Society is in general revolt over the current copyright law terms. The man in the street realizes the media giants have gone too far, but some how congress can't see it yet. Maybe they are just starting to see there is a problem.

In my experience it is completely mixed. A lot of people think that it is the law, so it must be good. The techs where I work first heard about SOPA when I went to a wikipedia page in front of them during the blackout (not deliberately, actually was trying to look something up); they didn't much care, and since I knew about it I believe they thought I used the internet too much. The close relatives I have mentioned it to (once) didn't know what it is either, probably because they are informed by TV news and newspapers, which never mentioned it at all, at least before the blackout. It is not something I would particularly want to talk about face to face, simply because it is not 'cool', and that matters.

Maybe your experience is different.

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