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Cellphones

Submission + - Google Pulls 21 Android Apps with Trojan Rootkits (switched.com)

suraj.sun writes: Thanks to a tip-off by a redditor, and some investigation by Android Police ( http://www.androidpolice.com/2011/03/01/the-mother-of-all-android-malware-has-arrived-stolen-apps-released-to-the-market-that-root-your-phone-steal-your-data-and-open-backdoor/ ), Google has pulled 21 Android Market apps that were infected with a backdoor Trojan rootkit. If you downloaded any of the infected apps, they will be automatically deleted from your phone.

The attack vector was ingenious, and plays on the Android Market's biggest weakness: the almost complete absence of app moderation. The nefarious developer crafted 21 apps that share the name of legitimate apps (such as 'Chess'), and into each of them he inserted some Trojan code. The apps then quietly report your sensitive data back to a remote server, while you play with your free app.

Download Squad: http://downloadsquad.switched.com/2011/03/02/google-pulls-21-android-malware-apps-with-trojan-rootkit-over-50000-infected/

Android Police: http://www.androidpolice.com/2011/03/01/the-mother-of-all-android-malware-has-arrived-stolen-apps-released-to-the-market-that-root-your-phone-steal-your-data-and-open-backdoor/

Submission + - U.S. Bans Marijuana Substitute 'Fake Pot' Chemical (ibtimes.com)

Anonymous Coward writes: "The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) said it has temporarily banned five chemicals used to make so-called "fake pot" products, perceived as "legal" alternatives to marijuana. According to the DEA, these substances, known as synthetic cannabinoids, are biologically similar to THC, the active chemical in marijuana."

Submission + - SCO found no source code in 2004 (groklaw.net)

doperative writes: A consultant hired by SCO in 2004 to compare UNIX and Linux, with the thought he could be used as an expert at trial, says that, after days and days, his comparison tool found "very little correlation". When he told that to SCO, it paid him and he never heard from SCO again.

Submission + - Forensic Analysis Of Geohot's Computer In Dispute! (psx-scene.com)

Anonymous Coward writes: "In the latest round of Sony vs. Geohot legal wrangling, court documents reveal that there is now a dispute as to how Geohot's hard drives are being handled by the third-party company designated to analyze them.

The original court order only called for the drive(s) to be delivered to a third party "for the purpose of isolating, segregating and/or removing the information on those devices related to Defendant Hotz's circumvention of the TPMs in the PS3 system."

Now the company doing the analysis wants to create TWO FULL IMAGES of the drive(s), in both decrypted and encrypted form!!! According to Geohot's attorneys, "SCEA is not entitled to inspect the impounded drives under the impoundment order, nor is it allowed to create and preserve additional copies of the impounded drives, but this is precisely what it seeks to do.""

Intel

Submission + - Intel’s new SSD is the 6Gbps 510 series

An anonymous reader writes: We knew that Intel was going to have to release some new SSDs sooner or later and it turns out that today was the today. The company unveiled the SSD 510 series which will use a speedy 6Gbps interface in order to allow for maximum throughput to today’s newest motherboards, like those packing Intel’s own Cougar Point chipsets. In their release Intel noted that the 510 series is capable of reading data at over 500MBps and writing it at over 315MBps, making for greatly increased speeds compared to their older products. The other bit of big news for these 120GB and 250GB SSDs is that they use a Marvell controller instead of Intel's homegrown one.
Internet Explorer

Submission + - Microsoft Agrees ActiveX Content Should Be Blocked (msdn.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A post on the IE blog details the new ActiveX filtering feature in the IE9 release candidate. Microsoft's Herman Ng writes, 'ActiveX Filtering in the IE9 Release Candidate gives you greater control over how Web pages run on your PC. With ActiveX Filtering, you can turn off ActiveX controls for all Web sites and then turn them back on selectively as you see fit. While ActiveX controls like Adobe Flash are important for Web experiences today for videos and more, some consumers may want to limit how they run for security, performance, or other reasons.' My favourite quote from the article is one of the image captions: 'ActiveX content may prevent you from having a good experience viewing a Web site'
Apple

Submission + - Will Apple kill its third-party store network? (delimiter.com.au)

daria42 writes: "Industry observers have long eyed Apple's expansion of its own retail stores as an important move which could see it eventually decide to cease third-party distribution of its products alone and become the sole avenue through which consumers can buy its products. But how far away is that move? Very close, according to Australian consumer electronics entrepreneur Ruslan Kogan, who has built his own business purely on the internet retail model. It seems likely the company will make the move on a country by country basis as it rolls out its own stores."
Robotics

Submission + - Prospero: Robot Swarm Farmer (robots.net)

Anonymous Coward writes: "A forum post on TrossenRobotics.com shows what's called a an Autonomous Micro Planter (AMP), a small, six-legged robot named Prospero, that's capable of drilling seed holes and depositing seeds in them. The forum post includes two YouTube videos and several photos. The author of the post, David Dorhout, describes this category of machine as the first of four steps, saying The other three steps involve autonomous robots that tend the crops, harvest them, and finally one robot that can plant, tend, and harvest--autonomously transitioning from one phase to another. Prospero was designed for a contest sponsored by SchmartBoard and placed first in the Parallax MCU segment (there were also TI and MicroChip MCU segments). The forum post links to a PDF which explains the project in detail, including source code."
Games

Submission + - Asus' Kinect-like system for PCs coming in May (idg.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "Asus will soon offer a motion sensing device that looks and works like the Xbox Kinect. The Wavi Xtion system has two parts: a media streaming device and the sensor. The streaming device extends the PC's desktop to a television alongside which the sensor is located and maintains a channel back to the PC for data from the sensor."

Submission + - Judge tires of mass P2P filing (arstechnica.com)

Locke2005 writes: Judge Milton Shadur threw out Copyright Lawyer John Steele's 300 count copyright infringement case filed in Illinois based on the simple observation that the lawyer should have known from the IP addresses that the majority of IP addresses accused of infringing were not in fact in Illinois...
Security

Submission + - Infected Androids Run Up Big Texting Bills

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Computerworld reports that a rogue Android app is hijacking smartphones and running up big texting bills to premium rate numbers before the owner knows it. Chinese hackers grabbed a copy of Steamy Windows, a free program, added a backdoor Trojan horse to the app's code, then placed the reworked app on unsanctioned third-party "app stores" where unsuspecting or careless Android smartphones find it, download it and install it. "This one stands out," says Vikram Thakur, a principle security response manager at Symantec. "It's pretty comprehensive in what it's doing." The app also has a built-in filter that blocks incoming texts from the user's carrier, a trick it uses to keep victims in the dark about the invisible texting. "It monitors inbound SMS texts, and blocks alerts telling you that you've already exceeded your quota," says Thakur adding that smartphone owners won't be aware of the charges they've racked up texting premium services until they receive their next statement. "If you're hell-bent on using [unauthorized app stores], look at the permissions the app requests when it installs. A [rogue] app will request more permissions than the legitimate version.""
Businesses

Submission + - Intel completes McAfee acquisition (idg.com.au) 2

angry tapir writes: "Intel has completed its US$7.68 billion acquisition of security vendor McAfee, the chip maker has announced. The all-cash deal makes Intel a security industry powerhouse, giving it a broad range of consumer and enterprise security products. Intel had been working to get the deal approved by U.S. and European Union regulators since it was announced last August. The European Commission, in particular, had expressed concerns that Intel would give McAfee special treatment when it came to its processors and chipsets, locking other security vendors out of the technology."
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - PlayStation 3 Banned In Europe Temporarily (tekgoblin.com)

tekgoblin writes: "Looks like Sony is in some trouble at least in Europe. LG had recently sued Sony with a Patent dispute over their blu-ray technology and have been granted a preliminary injunction in the matter. This injunction prevents the PlayStation 3 from currently being imported to Europe. For at least the next 10 days, every PlayStation that is imported will be seized by Government officials."

Comment Re:Cut out the middleman (Score 1) 75

There's more to a database than simply speed. There's transactions, rich data types, index types that support those rich data types (you can only us a b-tree when your data types come from a metric space, hence, for instance, PostgreSQL's GIN and GiST index types), a standardized (if somewhat arcane and problematic) query language...

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