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Comment Why no X12? (Score 1) 315

http://www.x.org/wiki/Development/X12 Even this page on X.org lists a lot of great reasons why X11 is outdated and needs to replaced, yet I don't know of any serious project to create a new, modern X. All X development is focused around fixing and extending X11. I guess X11 has become so big and so universal that there's no real desire to tear it down and start from scratch.

Comment Re:Galactic Empire (Score 1) 186

Yeah, that was absolutely my favorite. Every once in a while I get nostalgic and find a telnet-able BBS that still has it and play it non-stop for a week or so until I realize I'm completely neglecting the rest of my life and I force myself to stop. I'd get into it again if I found a place to play it that actually had a decent group of people and actual competition. Often times you'll only find one or two other people playing so you end up hunting Cybertrons almost exclusively. I remember playing in the early 1990's and having some crazy five-player battles... the last time I played, the only other guy playing got pissed at me because I blew his ship up so he stopped playing!

Comment The format is irrelevant now (Score 1) 431

I have a collection of about 700 CDs and about 100 vinyl records of different sizes and speeds. I honestly can't tell you the last time I put any of them in a CD player or on a turntable. I, like many, have my entire music collection digitized. If I buy a CD, it gets ripped to my computer and then it sits on a shelf. If I buy vinyl, I go online and find the MP3s and then the vinyl sits on a shelf. I still buy music (instead of just downloading it) because I think it's the right thing to do, and I still buy music on physical formats because I'd rather have an actual physical copy to collect AND audio files on my computer than just audio files on my computer (especially if the audio files I buy are going to be DRMed and won't play on all my devices anyway). So if I'm going to buy a physical copy "just to have it," and I'm not actually going to play it on anything... why not buy vinyl with bigger artwork and better packaging? I think that is the decision that a lot of people are making when they go to (what is left of) record stores.

Comment Re:Vote with your wallet: (Score 3, Insightful) 161

The e-mail could go something like this: "You're one of my favorite artists and I love your work! Now I won't be supporting you because of the position your performance rights organization has taken. I hope you can continue to create wonderful music without my financial support, not that I'll be enjoying them." I'm all for copyright reform, and I abhor the positions of groups like ASCAP and the RIAA, but I don't think boycotting the artists is the right step to take. For example, let's you love a great independent band but you're upset they've signed with an RIAA-backed major label, and you won't purchase their new album because of your disdain for the RIAA, and other people do the same. So, the new album is a flop. The major label realizes and decides that this small act wasn't ready for the Big Time, and drops them off the label. Now your favorite band has a failed album, they've lost their outlet with which to release their work, and if anything they're in debt from the entire experience. The RIAA is no worse off. ASCAP is different because they do performance rights, not the releasing of music, but the effect is the same. Boycotting artists that you like just because they are affiliated with ASCAP won't hurt ASCAP, there will just be fewer artists that you like who are able to be successful. How about an e-mail to your favorite artist that says "I love your work and I'm happy to support you, but I'm concerned about the positions that ASCAP and the RIAA are taking. Have your considered releasing your work through alternative channels of distribution?" A thousand musicians who can't make a living through the "system" and get dropped aren't going to change anything, but a thousand musicians inside the "system" who can lobby these groups to modernize absolutely could.

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