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Comment Re:Well.. (Score 1) 37

I don't do the books, so I don't know the revenue numbers, but I know we're profitable, and so far profit is always turned around into more growth -- generally developers or support.

As for our prices, we don't charge for software licenses at all, so we're infinitely less expensive than the big guys in that regard. ;)

When it comes to support, ours is insanely cheap compared to HP OpenView, IBM Tivoli, or any of the other big players we compete with, especially when you scale up. Of course, you can't comparison shop because HP and IBM and their like hide their (per-node) licensing and support prices behind channel partners and "have a salesperson call you," generally billing small customers with no clout a multiple per license what they charge for large customers for "volume discounts," despite the fact that it doesn't matter to the software itself how many nodes there are.

If you don't need support, OpenNMS is free, and always will be. Many people don't need it; there's a healthy community who can help. But the people who work for the .com side of things have been in network management for years, and if you want help on how to solve a particular monitoring problem, or want someone to call for help if something goes wrong, that's how we continue to be able to pay people full-time to make OpenNMS better.

Submission + - Gartner Issues Smackdown on Open Core (gartner.com)

Sortova writes: "Those of us who are concerned about the growing prevalence of the open core (or fauxpen source) business model are often ignored when those VC-backed companies have much more to spend on marketing, as well as the few but profitable acquisitions accomplished by VCs such as Benchmark. We're often labelled as open source "zealots" and enterprises are told to ignore us.

However, enterprises tend not to ignore the advice of Gartner, one of the most respected analyst organizations out there. Today, Brian Prentice posted Open-Core: The Emperor's New Clothes which is a scathing critique of the business model, not as a road to VC riches, but as a solution that enterprises should consider.

There are way too many good quotes to pick just one, but he sums things up with "You see, when you start peeling back some of the value propositions being attached to open core business models what starts to appear is a picture of a bog standard software provider trying to use the latest phraseology to cut through the noise of a crowded marketplace".

In a similar blog post back in 2008 I wrote "The emperor is naked, folks." It is nice to see someone with influence agreeing with me."

Comment Re:Well.. (Score 4, Informative) 37

(Disclaimer: I'm one of the OpenNMS developers.)

Depends on what you do in your enterprise. OpenNMS does a lot of useful stuff out of the box, but is a platform first, and an application second. OpenNMS's biggest strength is the breadth of ways to integrate it with other tools, and huge scalability (we have installations collecting millions of data points every 5 minutes, and monitoring devices with 50k interfaces each without breaking a sweat, replacing failing OpenView installations in large telcos). New features are new features, and we're pretty conservative in the scope of features that get put into the even (stable) releases. If you're running unstable, well, they're new features, and sometimes there are bugs... All a part of developing in the fish bowl.

And you don't need an account manager at the other end to yell at when you can get immediate support from someone with intimate knowledge of the system, that's how we've survived as a company while remaining true to being 100% open source software. No BS, just support which is all "level 3." Not that we typically have things that just cease to function without provocation, but without a bug report it's hard to answer that particular comment. ;)

Open Source

OpenNMS Celebrates 10 Years 37

mjhuot writes "Quite often is it claimed that pure open source projects can't survive, much less grow and create robust code. One counter example of this is OpenNMS, the world's first enterprise-grade network management application platform developed under the open source model. Registered on 30 March 2000 as project 4141 on Sourceforge, today the gang threw a little party, with members virtually attending from around the world. With the right business savvy and a great community, it is possible to both remain 100% free and open source while creating enough value to make a good living at it."
Technology

Submission + - OpenNMS celebrates 10 years! (adventuresinoss.com)

mjhuot writes: Quite often is it claimed that pure open source projects can't survive, much less grow and create robust code. One counter example of this is OpenNMS, the world first enterprise grade network management application platform developed under the open source model.

Registered on 30 March 2000 on Sourceforge as project 4141, today the gang threw a little party, with members virtually attending from around the world.

With the right business savvy and a great community, it is possible to both remain 100% free and open source while creating enough value to make a good living at it.

Microsoft

Microsoft, Amazon Ink Kindle and Linux Patent Deal 161

theodp writes "Microsoft says it has reached a wide-ranging IP agreement with Amazon in which each company has granted the other a license to its patent portfolio. Microsoft says the agreement covers technologies in products such as Amazon's Kindle — including open-source and proprietary technologies used in the e-reader — in addition to the use of Linux-based servers. Microsoft issued a news release celebrating the accord, while Amazon declined to comment. 'We are pleased to have entered into this patent license agreement with Amazon.com,' said Microsoft's deputy general counsel. 'Microsoft's patent portfolio is the largest and strongest in the software industry, and this agreement demonstrates our mutual respect for intellectual property as well as our ability to reach pragmatic solutions to IP issues regardless of whether proprietary or open source software is involved.' A Microsoft representative declined to say which of its products are covered by the deal."
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft, Amazon Ink Kindle and Linux Patent Deal

theodp writes: Microsoft says it has reached a wide-ranging IP agreement with Amazon in which each company has granted the other a license to its patent portfolio. Microsoft says the agreement covers technologies in products including Amazon's Kindle — including open-source and proprietary technologies used in the e-reader — in addition to the use of Linux-based servers. Microsoft issued a news release celebrating the accord, while Amazon declined to comment. 'We are pleased to have entered into this patent license agreement with Amazon.com,' said Microsoft's deputy general counsel.. 'Microsoft's patent portfolio is the largest and strongest in the software industry, and this agreement demonstrates our mutual respect for intellectual property as well as our ability to reach pragmatic solutions to IP issues regardless of whether proprietary or open source software is involved.' A Microsoft representative declined to say which of its products are covered by the deal.
Open Source

Submission + - How to make an Open Source Business (ustream.tv)

mjhuot writes: Many of us love working in open source software, but few of us have figured out how to do it full time or to make a career out of it. At this weekend's Southern California Linux Expo, keynote speaker Tarus Balog presented an inspiring talk on how he has been able to create a successful services company supporting the open source network management application platform OpenNMS. If you were unable to make the conference, the talk is available online and is worth checking out.

Comment Re:Okay, that's enough. (Score 1) 670

That's because fundamentally we only have 1 group in power:
People Who Want You To Do What They Say.
We have no liberty, only lip-service to an ethereal concept we label "liberty". It's still possible for a majority of voters to vote to take away or prevent the granting of rights to people who do not conform to the majority's standard. I'm straight, but the fact that people can vote to prevent gays from marrying means it's NOT a free country. We are instead oppressed by our leaders AND our peers instead of just our leaders.

Comment Re:It's so very odd..... (Score 1) 1376

Very true. Every person, religious or not, feels that certain things are untrue. Most Christians, Jews, and Muslims would agree that Ganesh is a fable. "Elephant-headed god, indeed!" they'd say. Then you tell them that you don't believe in their god, and they think you're a bigot. I don't just "not believe", I actively disbelieve. There's a huge difference there, and many people need to be less mealy-mouthed and own up to their active disbelief and its difference from passive nonbelief. To not believe is to not put faith in an assertion. To disbelieve is to think the assertion is very likely to be incorrect. A "not proven" verdict is different from "not guilty".

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