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Comment Re:Can we get an explanation on who gets mod point (Score 1) 1839

I suspect there's a line of code in the "assignModPoints" function that says something like

if(freaks.contains("pudge")) return 0;

I haven't gotten mod points in a long time either, though I suspect in my case that I had turned off the "willing to moderate" option when it existed in the user options, and unrelated to that pudge foed me at a later time.

The Internet

T-Mobile's Binge On Violates Net Neutrality, Says Stanford Report (tmonews.com) 218

An anonymous reader writes: The debate over whether or not Binge On violates Net Neutrality has been raging ever since the service was announced in November. The latest party to weigh in is Barbara van Schewick, law professor at Stanford University.

In a new report published today — and filed to the FCC, as well — van Schewick says that Binge on "violates key net neutrality principles" and "is likely to violate the FCC's general conduct rule." She goes on to make several arguments against Binge On, saying that services in Binge On distorts competition because they're zero-rated and because video creators are more likely to use those providers for their content, as the zero-rated content is more attractive to consumers.

Comment couples with joint accounts? (Score 1) 114

everyone's getting excited about outing some LGBTQs, but i'm guessing there are many more couples sharing joint accounts with names like John Jane Doe. and then you have all the completely fake accounts that do nothing but spam. my guess is that if someone wants to use a fake name, the only way facebook is going to know about it and take some action is if some of their friends are jerks and turn them in.

Comment Re:Wny did they need the certificates? (Score 1) 95

Issuing for .test and .local are strictly prohibited by the CABForum EV requirements. They will soon be outlawed for DV under the basic requirements.

What seems to have happened is that instead of issuing all test certs for test.verisign.com as the procedure manual required, they had to modify the procedure when Symantec took over and they no longer had verisign.com.

So instead of doing what they should have done and using test.symantec.com or a test domain bought for the purpose, they typed the first name that entered their head.

Comment Re:Self Signed (Score 1) 95

Actually it doesn't. DANE certificates are not self-signed for a start, they are signed by the DNSSEC key for the zone.

The problem with DANE is that you swap the choice of multiple CAs for a monopoly run by ICANN, a shadowy corporation that charges a quarter million bucks for a TLD because that is what the market will bear. What do you think the price of DANE certification will rise to if it takes off?

ICANN is the Internet version of the NFL only with greater opportunities for peculation and enrichment.

Comment Re:Wny did they need the certificates? (Score 1) 95

Damn right they should. The CPS has a long section on the use of test hardware.

The problem is that all the original team that built VeriSign have been gone for years. A lot of us left before the sale of the PKI business to Symantec. The PKI/DNS merger was not a happy or successful partnership. The original point of the merger was to deploy DNSSEC. that effort was then sabotaged by folk in IETF and ICANN which has delayed the project by at least 10 and possibly 20 years. ATLAS was originally designed to support DNSSEC.

Unfortunately, in PKI terms what VeriSign was to IBM, Symantec is to Lenovo.

They apparently remember the ceremonies we designed but not the purpose. So they are going through the motions but not the substance.

One of the main criticisms I have heard is that we built the system too well. From 1995 up to 2010 it worked almost without any issues. So people decided that they didn't need things like proper revocation infrastructure. The only recent issue the 1995 design could not have coped with was DigiNotar which was a complete CA breach.

There are some developments on the horizon in the PKI world that will help add controls to mitigate some of the issues arising since. But those depend on cryptographic techniques that won't be practical for mass adoption till we get our next generation ECC crypto fully specified.

Comment Re:What is a pre-certificate? (Score 3, Informative) 95

A pre-certificate is created for use in the Certificate Transparency system. Introducing pre-certificates allows the CT log proof to be included in the certificate presented to an SSL/TLS server.

The CT system generates a proof that a pre-certificate has been enrolled in it. The proof is then added to the pre-certificate as an extension and the whole thing signed with the production key to make the actual certificate.

If the CT system logged the actual certificate, the proof of enrollment would only be available after the certificate had been created.

Comment Re:Wrong! (Score 1) 485

Flags have been around for ages, too.

Possibly not as long as you think. The UK, for example, has the second oldest flag in the world and it dates from the beginning of the 19th century (Denmark has the oldest).

Comment Re:20% slowdown isn't that bad... (Score 1) 128

Vista wasn't crippled by processor speed, anyway, it was crippled by being installed on low RAM systems. That and having lots of shit services running as default.

I'm still typing from my almost 10 year old Vista system on which I play Elite : Dangerous and a whole host of other new games. The graphics card is newer.

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