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typodupeerror

Submission + - Is New York city the world's largest hick town?

Savior_on_a_Stick writes: "I've been wrestling with putting new office and work spaces online in that city, and I swear it is the most backward assed place on the planet.

You would think a property manager in NYC would be able to tell prospective business tenants what broadband connection options are available.

Most cannot respond with anything beyond dumb looks.

Those that respond at all just tell you, "oh, everyone uses Time Warner."

And in a huge number of buildings, that really IS the only option.
Because they've entered into monopolistic deals that bundle all data entries through a mux, tenants can't get dsl.
The only option is a T1, and in NYC, even that takes a month.

No one in NYC seems to have any freaking clue that a world even exists outside their little 12 square block rat warren, and has no interest anyway.

I am firmly convinced now that the only vitality and innovation and life in NYC is from out of towners attracted by money.

The locals seem just a bit slow and thick.

I tried to line up some standby IT services — people to do things requiring a physical presence since I'm not based in NYC, but every company I contacted sounded like they had the village idiot answering the phone.

I concluded I'd be better off using my own people, even with no technical background, they are head and shoulders above these dim bulbs.

WTF happened to New York?

Have the maggots finally consumed the whole thing?"
Linux

Submission + - Will Linux ever become a popular choice? (thepcreport.net)

An anonymous reader writes: We’re all sick of hearing the question “is Linux ready for the desktop?”. This has been asked for years, debated for years, and basically not much has changed for years. It’s time for the question to be improved to “will Linux ever become a popular choice?”.
The reality is that Linux has a poor market share, and something needs to change.

Comment Re:are our brains leaking out of our heads? (Score 1) 286

More and more games are using newer DRM (e.g. newer versions of Securom) that lock the game to your hardware instead of requiring the CD (e.g. Command & Conquer Red Alert 3 has such DRM).

The benefit to the publisher with this is that they can produce one version of the game for both digital sale and retail stores and from there only one set of patches.

Comment They might patent it, but they won't use it (Score 1) 118

Considering their software is installed, by default, on a significant percentage of new computers sold every day, after whatever time the license lasts elapses, the volume of complaints that people's computers no longer work correctly would skyrocket beyond any numbers that we've seen previously.
Earth

Submission + - New Type of Cloud Discovered (wired.com) 3

phantomfive writes: In Iowa and Scotland there are reports of a type of cloud not yet recognized by the World Meteorological Foundation. It seems the cloud does not match any of the clouds in the International Cloud Atlas, and thus there is a campaign underway to have it included. Some have said the clouds look like armageddon has arrived. For me, writing clouds all these times makes me want to eat cotton candy.
Space

Submission + - ISS science report released (nasa.gov)

Earthquake Retrofit writes: NASA has released an extensive report on science results from experiments performed on the International Space Station. From the summary:

"One of the most compelling results reported is the confirmation that the ability of common germs to cause disease increases during spaceflight, but that changing the growth environment of the bacteria can control this virulence. The Effect of Spaceflight on Microbial Gene Expression and Virulence experiment identified increased virulence of space-flown Salmonella typhimurium, a leading cause of food poisoning. New research on subsequent station missions will target development of a vaccine for this widespread malady."

I can't tell if this is good news, bad or both.

Also from a quick look at the report (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/389388main_ISS%20Science%20Report_20090030907.pdf), I see that soybeans grow bigger in space with no harmful effect.

Submission + - Chicago lost Olympics due to US passport control?

An anonymous reader writes: Chicago lost its bid for the 2016 Olympics (which went to Rio de Janiero instead), and it's looking very likely that US border procedures were one of the main factors which knocked Chicago out of the race:

Among the toughest questions posed to the Chicago bid team this week in Copenhagen was one that raised the issue of what kind of welcome foreigners would get from airport officials when they arrived in this country to attend the Games. Syed Shahid Ali, an I.O.C. member from Pakistan, in the question-and-answer session following Chicagoâ(TM)s official presentation, pointed out that entering the United States can be "a rather harrowing experience." ... The exchange underscores what tourism officials here have been saying for years about the sometimes rigorous entry process for foreigners, which they see as a deterrent to tourism.

Submission + - Bullet train for California (google.com)

marquinhocb writes: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger requested $4.7 billion in federal stimulus money Friday to help build an 800-mile bullet train system from San Diego to San Francisco.
      "We're traveling on our trains at the same speed as 100 years ago," the governor said. "That is inexcusable. America must catch up."
      Planners said the train would be able to travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco in two hours and 40 minutes, traveling at speeds of more than 200 miles per hour.

About damned time! There comes a point when "let's add another lane" is no longer a viable option!

Microsoft

Submission + - Verizon fails at hiding packet filtering 2

Ribbons Almark writes: Today Verizon Fios customers of the Northeast coast of the United States experienced the most extreme packet filtering ever. Today Verizon tried to filter packets out of incoming data and limited communication between Verizon data and Microsoft data. Sites like Bing, Verizon.net were completely operational. Messenger programs like AIM, SKYPE, ASTRA, and YAHOO Messenger were crippled, while MSN/LIVE Messenger continued to work in full capacitiy. Further more email accounts for Verizon.net, Verizon.com, MSN, Hotmail and Live continued to work will all other email accounts were inaccessible. It can not be confirmed if this the first steps verizon is taking to filter content or if verizon is trying to test out non-net neutral filtering. Only one thing is known that this is only the beginning and the only worse is to come. This has been a report from Celestial Being a consumer advocate company.
Communications

Palm Kills Community Before It Begins 247

Former Fan of Palm writes to tell us that an enthusiastic, supportive developer community has fallen victim to corporate ineptitude once again. The preDevCamp started as a community-driven effort designed to mirror the iPhoneDevCamp based on the new "Pre" product announced by Palm. Unfortunately, suspicion and legal posturing seems to have gutted the founders of any and all enthusiasm they may have once had. When will corporations realize that community support is the best way to drive success? "As a corporation, I acknowledge that Palm's only responsibility is to its shareholders. There's nothing self serving or evil about that; it's how things work in big business. However there are many keen and willing developers out there, who have been waiting for the arrival of WebOS. A development platform is only a success if it is broadly adopted. Instead of embracing the grassroots upswell of interest in WebOS that preDevCamp fostered, Palm seem to be, at best, oblivious and, at worst, disdainful of the enthusiasm and good will engendered by these folk. I think they are missing a real opportunity to be involved in and to help generate the growth of a vital community."
Data Storage

Nanotube Memory Finally Beats Flash For Speed 86

holy_calamity writes "Although flash memory that stores each bit on a single nanotube has been tinkered with in the lab for years, it has always been much slower than the devices in use today. A Finnish team has now cracked that, demonstrating single bits of nanotube memory that can be written in just 100 nanoseconds. Existing flash memory takes tens of microseconds."

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