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Businesses The Almighty Buck

In a Poll, 43% of Millennials in 36 Countries Say They Plan To Leave Their Jobs Within Two Years (qz.com) 227

A poll by Deloitte with more than 10,000 millennials across 36 countries found that 43% of them are planning to leave their jobs within two years, while only 28% are looking to stay beyond five years.

In a Poll, 43% of Millennials in 36 Countries Say They Plan To Leave Their Jobs Within Two Years

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  • Job duration... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by b0s0z0ku ( 752509 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:11PM (#56617980)

    Do most jobs last more than two years in 2018? We're not living in 1958 where someone could go to work for GM or IBM at 21 and work there for 40 years till retirement.

    Employers can fire you at a moment's notice -- why should they expect more loyalty in return?

    • Re:Job duration... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by bobstreo ( 1320787 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:13PM (#56618006)

      Do most jobs last more than two years in 2018? We're not living in 1958 where someone could go to work for GM or IBM at 21 and work there for 40 years till retirement.

      Employers can fire you at a moment's notice -- why should they expect more loyalty in return?

      I only read the article summary, but if they're shit minimum wage/tipped jobs, one shithole is exactly the same as any other.

      If they're "professional" jobs, some migration and grass is greener syndrome may figure in.

      You're right about loyalty being a two way street though.

      • It's not "grass is greener" syndrome it's that loyalty is no longer rewarded. It's better to leave a job within 18-30 months of getting it for a job at another company with the possibility of returning 18-30 months later for a much larger promotion than if you had stayed with the company.

        My wife made the mistake of accepting more money to stay instead of leaving for a full time position. They jerked her around on contracts for 2 years , denying benefits/bonuses/etc. while repeatedly changing her job descr

        • They're young. People usually go into a job thinking "this is just temporary" but then inertia sets in and they look up and it's been 5 or 10 years.
    • by 110010001000 ( 697113 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:15PM (#56618016) Homepage Journal
      If you are an excellent employee you can work as long as you want at a company, as long as that company is in business. A company would never fire an excellent employee. They are way too hard to find.
      • Forget the sarcasm tag?

      • Re:Job duration... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by b0s0z0ku ( 752509 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:20PM (#56618046)
        Problem is that in the US, "excellence" is defined as 60 hour weeks with a pitiful week of vacation every other year.
        • Re: (Score:2, Flamebait)

          by Trogre ( 513942 )

          That's terrible. Do you not have proper employment laws in your country?

          Are you sure the US hasn't already become one of those "shithole" countries that Mr Trump was speeching about?

          • To sum it up in a word: no. Employers are not required to offer vacation, or to pay overtime over 40hr/wk for higher-paid workers.
        • No it isn't. That is what YOU might think excellence is.
        • you work for the wrong companies.

        • Problem is that in the US, "excellence" is defined as being used like a $20 whore and then discarded.

          Fixed that for you.

      • by mcmonkey ( 96054 )

        Oh wait, you're serious. Let me laugh even harder.

        • I said "excellent". No company would let an employee like that go. There would be no point. The problem with you people is you think everyone is "excellent".
          • Re:Job duration... (Score:5, Interesting)

            by flink ( 18449 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:52PM (#56618182)

            I said "excellent". No company would let an employee like that go. There would be no point. The problem with you people is you think everyone is "excellent".

            Sure they would. If the "excellent" employee is being payed what they are worth, the company might decide that 2 mediocre employees could do the same job cheaper. Or maybe even farm it out to a bunch of barely passable contractors in Bangalore.

            • I am in exactly this situation right now.
              "Excellent" might be a stretch, but I am a pretty good employee, and my direct boss knows it.
              Our problem is that the senior management that makes the actual decisions don't give a fuck about me or anyone else with the exception of the shareholders, so when they refuse me the pay rise I want, and I get a new job that pays the money I want, they will have to find a new person to fill my job which will actually cost them more money.
              They might decide to not refill
              • by Flozzin ( 626330 )
                We clearly work in the same company if not on the same team.
              • by clodney ( 778910 )

                Companies and their management end up being like the difference between my congressperson (he's fine, no reason to replace him), and Congress as a whole (what a bunch of chumps, throw the bums out!).

                I may like my manager and respect him, yet be very dissatisfied with the policies of the corporation as a whole, which the managers do have some input in creating.

                Particularly coming out of a recession where wages were stagnant, a company might be in a situation where many of their developers are underpaid relat

            • I said "excellent". No company would let an employee like that go. There would be no point. The problem with you people is you think everyone is "excellent".

              Sure they would. If the "excellent" employee is being payed what they are worth, the company might decide that 2 mediocre employees could do the same job cheaper. Or maybe even farm it out to a bunch of barely passable contractors in Bangalore.

              Yep, where I work I've seen plenty of experienced employees get replaced by interns. The experienced employee could get a lot of work done quickly but cost money, the intern cost much less but most produced almost no work.

            • Sure they would. If the "excellent" employee is being payed what they are worth, the company might decide that 2 mediocre employees could do the same job cheaper. Or maybe even farm it out to a bunch of barely passable contractors in Bangalore.

              Every company from the highest of the high to the lowest of the low does this. I've seen it happen at Kmart, but probably the best example is Safeway. A few years ago my local store paid everyone who had retirement on the horizon a bonus to just go away, but I'm pretty sure this was more or less universal. Now I don't even bother to shop at my local one because a) most of them don't even know how to run a register and b) the ones that do are literally complaining about their job to me the whole time I'm the

          • > The problem with you people is you think everyone is "excellent".

            Of course everyone is excellent. They all got the trophy, didn't they?

          • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

            They will dispose of excellent employees as soon as they can hire 1.5 college grads to do the same work for the same money. At least, that's how some companies work.

            Sadly if you want good money you often have to keep switching jobs.

            • Minor correction:

              They will dispose of excellent employees as soon as they can hire 1.5 college grads to do what they believe is the same work for the same money.

      • by novakyu ( 636495 )

        I'm so happy for you that you are perfect. I wish I could be as perfect as you!

      • A company would never fire an excellent employee. They are way too hard to find.

        With 2.4% unemployment across our whole economy, ANY employees are hard to find.

      • Maybe, but don't expect your pay raises to reflect their appreciation of you. The reason job hopping is so popular these days is because that is the fastest way to increase your annual income. You can stay in your job and average a 3% raise every year for 10 years, or you can switch jobs every 2-3 years and negotiate a 20% increase over your previous salary each time. After 10 years you are looking at a difference of about a 35% pay increase for staying in your current job, or more than doubling your sta

    • by Junta ( 36770 )

      I wonder how much that is as chaotic as people keep claiming it to be.

      Sure, when I started my career, I bounced around a bit between a good job at a company that failed, to a horrific job at a failing company, to an ok job but with little chance for advancement and I would ultimately have to leave the company to make more money, but within 6 months out of college, I got the job I've been in for the last 15 years...

      I don't know how typical this is, but I remember going into the workforce all the dire warnin

      • Re:Job duration... (Score:5, Interesting)

        by flink ( 18449 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:56PM (#56618198)

        Same here. Finished college in 2001 and kept the job I started as an intern in '97 through 2012. I only left because of a merger I didn't like the smell of. I've been at my current job doing roughly the same kind of work as the first one for five years. I suppose I could have a slightly higher salary if I jumped around more, but I don't know if I would be as happy.

        • Re:Job duration... (Score:4, Insightful)

          by serviscope_minor ( 664417 ) on Wednesday May 16, 2018 @02:28AM (#56618978) Journal

          I suppose I could have a slightly higher salary if I jumped around more, but I don't know if I would be as happy.

          Unless your company is unusual, probably substantially higher but what you say is still correct. Moving up the career ladder beyond a certain point involves getting more responsibilities which means more pay, more hours and more stress. It definitely becomes a career you do as part of your life rather than a job, and it will eat more into your other time as a result. You certainly get less time to enjoy the more money you earn.

    • Re:Job duration... (Score:4, Interesting)

      by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:45PM (#56618164)

      We're not living in 1958 where someone could go to work for GM or IBM at 21 and work there for 40 years till retirement.

      This is a myth. Average job tenure is higher today. Some people had "jobs for life" back in the 1950s, but that was not common, and plenty of people worked as day laborers, or in short term work. This was especially true if you were not both white and male.

      Also, productivity is higher in states and countries that have lower job tenure. Vibrant and flexible job markets mean unhappy people can easily go where they are more productive and cross pollinate their skills. One of the reasons for the success of Silicon Valley is California's ban on non-compete agreements, which makes both job hopping and recruiting easier.

      Churn is good.

      • by sjames ( 1099 )

        I'll bet you went through more whiteout than anyone else in your history class.

    • I've never had a job last longer than two years in the tech industry. Either downsized or bought out or temp to hire contractor positions.
      • by antdude ( 79039 )

        I had the same SQA testing job from 2004 to 2015 until they laid me off. Before that, I was a contractor since 2002 for that company.

    • We're not living in 1958 where someone could go to work for GM or IBM at 21 and work there for 40 years till retirement.

      The time has nothing to do with it. There are plenty of 20-Lifers working in giant Fortune 500 companies just like the old days. What has changed is the expectation of the people, not the company. If the company keeps it interesting, fresh, remunerates well, and generally doesn't mistreat you then there may be no reason to change.

      I bucked the trend in my generation. I've worked at the same company for 10 years. In 6 very different roles for very different departments. In 4 different countries around the wor

    • by afidel ( 530433 )

      Lasted 9.5 years at my last job, could have stayed longer but an opportunity finally came along that was enough better to get me to move (~40% bump in pay when looking at total compensation package, and I was already well compensated). Been at the new job 2.5 years and I'm still considered one of the new guys, not a month goes by without someone celebrating a 20,25,30 year anniversary. So yes, jobs do still last more than 2 year in 2018. In fact any company not retaining employees for >24 months is serio

  • Er mah gerd... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:11PM (#56617988)

    ...after decades of eliminating long-term employees, companies face employees that do not plan on staying with them!

    Can you imagine that?

  • Most millennials will still be flipping burgers.

  • by Harlequin80 ( 1671040 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:32PM (#56618104)

    I work in recruitment for engineers in the civil infrastructure space. There are plenty of millennials in that pool.

    That % is going to very much depend on how the question is worded. I would argue that most people don't have a 2 year plan, let alone a 5 year plan. When I approach someone and try to tempt them with a new job I get about 10% of people that are genuinely interested in looking at a new role and I don't see much variation based on age range. But this is not them deciding to look for a new role, that is me trying to poach them.

    My clients see turnover rates of about 12% - 15% per year, a turnover of over 20% per year would be a sign of significant internal culture issues. Obviously this is a self selecting set of high income high education worker and will not represent the entire market by any means.

    • Yeah, I'd really like to see what a similar poll of non-millennials would end up showing.

      I'm way, way out of the "millennial" group - as are most of my co-workers and friends. But a significant percentage of people in my circle claim they are "looking"... and this is nothing new. Most of them will still be in the same job five years down the road, regardless of their stated intentions now - and they'll still be saying then that they're just about ready to leave, any day now.

    • by kenh ( 9056 )

      Obviously this is a self selecting set of high income high education worker and will not represent the entire market by any means.

      As a reminder, this survey polled millennials across 36 countries.

  • by rsilvergun ( 571051 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @08:33PM (#56618106)
    and they don't train. H1-Bs and outsourcing ended that. So the only way to get ahead is to use your current job as a spring board into something better. And since inflation's still a thing and companies don't give raises you're either getting a new job every two years or taking a substantial pay cut.

    Any pretense of a "social contract" is gone. What I don't understand is why folks don't all get behind Bernie Sanders' New New Deal. It's about time to hammer out a new contract since the ruling class reneged on the old one. And while we're at it we might as well take more for the working class this time.
    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Because explaining that the problem is complex and needs a longer term solution is less effective than chanting "build that wall".

    • by eth1 ( 94901 )

      So the only way to get ahead is to use your current job as a spring board into something better.

      This has been the case forever. If you're not doing this, you're doing it wrong. When you're looking for a job, you should actually be looking for one that will help you learn what you need for the job after that.

  • As a "millennial", I loathe incompetence, both below, and above. Incompetence below me can be worked around, incompetence above is irreparable. I can honestly say, despite having never been fired, and having had multiple jobs, I have never quit a job, I have only fired employers. When an employer fails to meet my needs, I replace them with another one. Baby boomers are baffled by this, because they've never lived in a world where they are inherently replaceable.

    • by kenh ( 9056 )

      I replace them with another one. Baby boomers are baffled by this, because they've never lived in a world where they are inherently replaceable.

      There is a whole generation of displaced IT workers that have trained, only to have been replaced by, H-1B workers - it's your contention that they have no idea what it means to be "inherently replaceable."

  • by manu0601 ( 2221348 ) on Tuesday May 15, 2018 @09:03PM (#56618232)
    Millennials just give back the consideration they get from their employers. Companies treat human resource as a fungible asset at best, or as an undesirable cost at worst. No surprise employees are not loyal to their employer in such an environment.
    • Millennials just give back the consideration they get from their employers. Companies treat human resource as a fungible asset at best, or as an undesirable cost at worst. No surprise employees are not loyal to their employer in such an environment.

      OTOH, employers are pulling their hair out, trying to figure out how to get millenials to actually work. More than one business owner I know actually looks for older employees because they know from experience that for every ten millenials they hire, seven of them will end up having to be let go because they can't show up on time, or don't do their work. And half of those seven will do so little and leave so quickly that the net return from employing them, after overhead and training costs, will be negati

  • Not one is waiting on a career to make their dent. Every single one of them has a plan to which they've witnessed how not to make it a career

  • That 43% of a random collection of millennials around the globe don't plan to stay with their current jobs past two years is far from surprising. We're talking about the world, not about just the 50 united states, or just the EU - it likely includes so-called third-world countries where things are tougher.

    I can easily imagine that 43% of the respondents were working dead-end jobs in third-world countries, that would easily account for the majority of the 43%, add in a few over-educated/frustrated starbucks

  • But I'm a Bubble boy, you insensitive clod!

  • In Another Poll, 56% of Millennials Bosses in 36 Countries Say The Jobs Plan To Leave Their Millennials Within One Year.

    Film at 11.

  • I work a sizeable company. EVERY new employee (myself included) says they plan to leave at some point soon. It's the mindset of our new generation...everyone thinks they're more capable than they really are, and that their first job is merely a footstool to something greater. Then complacency sets in. They get new friends, maybe a girlfriend, realize they don't want to go through the struggle of finding not only another job but a "better" one, and then they get comfortable.
  • by cshark ( 673578 ) on Wednesday May 16, 2018 @01:46PM (#56621686)

    Guys,
    The takeaway from this isn't how lazy millennials are. If that's you're reaction, you're a myopic idiot. Who's stupid and lazy, and who isn't has nothing to do with it. The bigger story here is that their expectations are low because the job market has changed. Dependable "normal" jobs have gone away, and the system continues to move exponentially in that general direction. We're also approaching the tipping point. The world we're headed into looks nothing like the old one, and if your eyes were opened, and looking at this whole thing honestly, you would see that.

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