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Television Media The Internet

Tech Companies Capture A Third Of This Year's Emmy Nominations (engadget.com) 31

"Streaming companies like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snagged nearly 1/3 of Emmy nominations this year, the most ever awarded to tech companies," reports Axios, adding that streaming companies "are pouring billions of dollars into content...and it's paying off." An anonymous reader quotes Engadget: After passing 100 million subscribers, overtaking cable TV in customer numbers in the US and expanding to over 190 countries, Netflix is starting to cement something else: sustained prestige. A record haul of 91 Emmy nominations puts Netflix -- which had 54 nominations last year -- just behind perennial frontrunner HBO with 110... A key component of this upgrade in status is the sheer number of original offerings Netflix has put out. If you throw everything at an awards committee, quite a few of them might stick... Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos has said Netflix spends over $6 billion a year on its own shows, in comparison to Amazon's reported spend of nearly $3 billion, with HBO at $2 billion...

Hulu picked up 18 nominations, up from two last year, including a first series nomination for dystopian A Handmaid's Tale. Together with Netflix's House of Cards, Stranger Things and The Crown, the majority of nominees in the competitive Outstanding Drama category were from streaming services. Amazon picked up 16 nominations, the same as last year.

The shows nominated for the most Emmy awards were NBC's Saturday Night Live, followed by HBO's Westworld, but Netflix ultimately ended up with more Emmy nominations than ABC, CBS, and Fox combined.
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Tech Companies Capture A Third Of This Year's Emmy Nominations

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  • Hey old Media , meet the disruption.
  • Just like the dead tree media companies. Old, outdated, replaced.
  • by Artagel ( 114272 ) on Sunday July 16, 2017 @05:08PM (#54821533) Homepage

    This is what happens when you make TV for the viewers. Network TV has to make every show 42 minutes long, with 18 minutes for commercials, and having to repeat the last scene when coming back from the TV break. It also has to consider what advertising demographic is drawn to it.

    When you only care about the paying viewer, the show is as long as the story takes, and no shorter or longer. You can plan for immersion. Non-advertisement cable made the invasion a while ago. No commercial breaks for Game of Thrones.

    I hope this continues.

    • Very well put. I would just like to add that this is a natural result of technological advancement that makes paying viewers easy. When TV began, using a direct paying viewer model was almost impossible; so the indirect paying viewer (with advertisers being the intermediaries) became the norm. Now, technology makes the direct payment between TV viewer and TV content producer both easy and cheap.
      • Very well put. I would just like to add that this is a natural result of technological advancement that makes paying viewers easy. When TV began, using a direct paying viewer model was almost impossible; so the indirect paying viewer (with advertisers being the intermediaries) became the norm. Now, technology makes the direct payment between TV viewer and TV content producer both easy and cheap.

        There are pre-internet precedents though. I live in Canada but have donated to the US public system years ago. They had leading edge programming at the time.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

    • Do not underestimate greed and the evil of advertisers.

      Do you see dancing cigarette packs before every show? No, because advertising evolved. Well, get ready for *everything* you see in a show to be a product placement.

      Soon enough they'll be using "green screen" props with corner markers for real-time replacement with the imagery of the product of whoever pays the most - for an 'impression' sold based on all the data your streaming service has collected on you. That's right, you're going to get customize

  • Not sure I have seen or heard of Stranger Things and The Crown, but it sounds interesting.
  • "sustained prestige"

    And we express, like George Costanza, restrained jubilation about the broadcasting companies' demise.

  • by houghi ( 78078 ) on Monday July 17, 2017 @06:50AM (#54824315)

    ... then every other company is a tech company, because they use tech.
    Just because you add the words "Internet" does not mean that it is new or tech or whatever. Google is a marketing company using tech to sell ads. Netflix is a media distribution company that has some own content using the Internet to distribute what they have.

    This is why most media companies use editors to correct this stuff. (See what I did there?)

  • This shouldn't be a surprise. 20-some-odd years ago, Pay-Per-View became "a thing" for live sporting events. The analysts predicted that eventually, you'd only pay for what you wanted to watch and some day you could watch whenever you wanted. PPV was way ahead of it's time and didn't take over, but DVR and streaming services have made it happen. This feels like a completely natural evolution to me, as the tech has made it happen. (Not that I was a fan of PPV. I never bought anything that way and

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