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Government The Military Politics

Kremlin Falls For Its Own Fake Satellite Imagery (thedailybeast.com) 120

An anonymous reader writes: The Turkish downing of the Russian SU-24 jet last November saw a predictable series of statements from each side claiming complete innocence and blaming the other entirely. Social media was a key battleground for both sides — the Turkish and Russian governments, along with their supporters — as each tried to establish a dominant narrative explanation for what had just happened. In the midst of the online competition, a little-observed, funhouse mirror of an online hoax was brilliantly perpetrated, one with consequences likely exceeding the expectation of the hoaxster. The Russian Ministry of Defense was duped by a fake image that Russian state media itself had circulated more than a year earlier, as a way to deny Moscow's involvement in the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17.
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Kremlin Falls For Its Own Fake Satellite Imagery

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  • are you sure it was not leftover from the images used to 'prove' existence of wmd in saddam's iraq? based on such fakes almost everyone in usa supported war (including clintons, though not obama or trump) which ended up killing millions, creating iran friendly iraq and isis, and finally with americans running as fast as possible from the mess they created.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      > iran friendly iraq and isis

      WTF? You should check your news sources. Iran doesn't like ISIS any more than anyone else (and vice versa), and they are sure to hold a grudge against Iraq for a long time (the general population sure hates and possibly even fears Iraq more than e.g. the US).
      The only thing I might grant you is that Iraq might be more positive towards Iran than since a long time, but if so it's fairly one-way so far and thus of limited consequence.

  • I have never understood why the owners and editors of a news outlet would call it "The Daily Beast". The name was first invented by Evelyn Waugh in his famous novel of journalistic corruption "Scoop". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

    Waugh makes it perfectly clear that "The Daily Beast" closely reflects the preferences of its owner, Lord Copper, who is ignorant, violently prejudiced, and deeply unpleasant. In short, it's a gutter-press rag which cannot even be trusted to get the bare facts right, and whose

    • Same reason a weather service [wikipedia.org] calls itself the Weather Underground [wikipedia.org].

      People have an individual and sometimes odd sense of humor. If they put out a good product, I'm more than willing to overlook their idiosyncrasies.
    • In other words, in your ideal world people like this wouldn't be free to disagree with you. I'm glad we don't live in that world, and people can publish whatever they like, even if you disagree with it.
      • by KGIII ( 973947 )

        Hmm... They neither said nor insinuated any of the things you're attributing to them. There is no "in other words" by my reading. Where'd you get that from your reading of their post?

        I've not seen 'em ever suggest that others couldn't disagree or publish their disagreement. What'd they say that makes you presume they're insinuating such? Or are you actually suggesting that they shouldn't be allowed to disagree with the paper or comment about the oddity of their name, who owns it, or how they feel about the

    • by Burz ( 138833 )

      The rag with Chelsea Clinton on its board gets a review of its political coverage (very negative against Bernie Sanders -- surprise!)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

  • What a tangled web we weave
    When first we practice to deceive
    But if the truth is what gets caught
    Russia's phony story gets bought.
    Burma Shave.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 06, 2016 @09:18AM (#51647903)

    You should understand the seriousness of the situation. After the turkish downed that russian Su-24 plane, resulting in the death of one of the pilots and a an airborne assault trooper involved in the other's rescue mission, Russia's GRU provided sensitive HUMINT data to the marxist kurdish rebels. Based on that data, a kurdish workers' party kamikaze car bomb rammed an (otherwise unmarked) bus carrying turkish air force personnel. The explosion killed 20 pilots and maimed several others, who were flying F-16s for the Turkish AF. The KIA included the particular pilot who downed the Su-24. Two full fighter jet squadrons immediately lost their combat capability due to lack of personnel and no turkish pilot will dare to go anywhere red star marked planes for a long time... This is how things are done by Russia.

    NATO is not willing to stand up for Turkey any more, because Erdogan behaves like a total lunatic and better replace him with a logically calculating general in a soon to happen coup d'etat. (Military dictatorship has always been the normal way of life in post-ottoman Turkey.)

    But if Turkey still tries to play the role of a strong guy, their military airports will be pelted by russian Iskhander ballistic missiles (~ Pershing-2 on steroids). You may consider that Blackwater recently pulled out all of is mercenary troops from Saudi Arabia, after the houthi rebels of Yemen pelted them with smaller ballistic missiles made in Iran, copycats of the russian Tochka-M design, in total killing almost a thousand saudis and mercenaries in six precision strikes. There were many high ranking officers among the dead and large amount of vehicles destroyed, because the missiles impact at Mach 6 and can cause tremendous devastation with just half a ton of conventional warhead. It's like a man-made asteroid. many sources think the suprisingly successfull houthi rebels are actually a mixture of yemeni locals, iranian spec-ops troops and russian military advisors.

    • Interesting read but I can not find any reference to Turkish Pilots being killed in the attack in February. It appears to have been army personnel that were the majority of the victims (and most likely from the nearby military training school - speculation no evidence). There is little detail about the dead, one funeral was for an army officer (guardian).

      I would find it unusual that the turkish army and airforce would share buses. However it is also unusual that names of any of the victims have not been di

    • by swb ( 14022 )

      NATO is not willing to stand up for Turkey any more, because Erdogan behaves like a total lunatic and better replace him with a logically calculating general in a soon to happen coup d'etat. (Military dictatorship has always been the normal way of life in post-ottoman Turkey.)

      There was just an article in yesterday's NY Times about the government seizure of a major newspaper which said:

      As Turkey faces its domestic demons, critics say the government has been emboldened to target its enemies within the country because the European Union and NATO allies, in particular, have looked the other way as they seek Turkey's support to contain the refugee crisis and pacify the raging civil war in Syria.

      I would argue that NATO is willing to cut him a lot of slack for various reasons. Euro-ce

      • An ally of convenience. NATO and the EU might not like Erdogan on ideological grounds, but right now there are mutual interests and enemies in play.

    • NATO is not willing to stand up for Turkey any more, because Erdogan behaves like a total lunatic and better replace him with a logically calculating general in a soon to happen coup d'etat. (Military dictatorship has always been the normal way of life in post-ottoman Turkey.)

      I don't think that'll happen anymore - Erdogan tapped into Turkey's dormant Sunni supremacist majority, and has decimated the secular army leadership. In fact, Erdogan has decimated all dissenting voices inside Turkey, and nobody, absolutely no-one in the West has as much as made a peep. Not even his blatant support of ISIS seems to ruffle much feathers.

    • While I have no love for Russia, your post merits a massive [Citation Needed] sticker.

      There was no such widely-publicized attack on Turkish pilots.

      By stepping down to the level of the Russian disinformation trolls, you've gained nothing. You're just as bad as they are.

  • So once again, I'm curious (and skeptical) enough to go read the linked story. And once again there is not a single link to any source to substantiate the claims in the summary (or the title of the article). All it has is a picture of a tweet by some unknown "news outlet" with the old fake satellite image and a crudely drawn border and an arrow pointing to it that says "border". Did someone confuse March 1st with April 1st? I mean, it's something a kid would draw, doesn't look even remotely like anything of

    • Why are all these bullshit political stories on Slashdot lately?!

      Have you considered the influence of money?

  • This kind of thing actually happens fairly frequently. The various functions of intelligence and counter intelligence are well compartmentalized out of necessity.

    It isn't, and hasn't for a long time, just been a story of these people duping eachother, but in fact, quite often, duping themselves.

    In fact, I have even seen claims that some of the torture techniques used by the CIA were the result of SERE training, but SERE training was the result of incorrect information about the use of torture which originat

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