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RFID Cookware 133

HaggiZ writes "Vitacraft are claiming to have what they call RFIQin Robotic Cookware (unfortunate name). It's basically pots and pans that you can place RFID cooking cards in the handle with. The communicate with the induction stove 16 times a second to adjust the cooking when required. Neat idea, although I'm not sure anything I cook needs to have it's temperature reviewed or adjusted every 0.06 of a second." For all the evil uses of RFID that have been floated over the years, it's nice to see that someone is going to finally make it so I stop burning my lunch.
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RFID Cookware

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:21PM (#14476090)
    I assumed it was for cooking RFID to kill it. Just like if I saw "RFID Aluminum hat" here, I'd assume it was to block it, not use it to monitor head heat.
    • I can see Reynold's introducing RFID into their foil line. Then not only could big brother know when and what you're cooking, when made into a hat they can also listen in on your thoughts.
    • YES!! I can finally brew my LSD without expensive bunsen burners

      WOOT FOR TECH!!!
  • by pieterh ( 196118 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:22PM (#14476095) Homepage
    One more step to being able to cook a meal without leaving the desk.
  • by __aatskl8715 ( 621624 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:23PM (#14476099)
    For the millionth time, it's = contraction of 'it is'. its=posessive of it.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    What's next, an RFID fork that communicates with your plate to pick up just the right amount of food?
  • ummm... (Score:5, Funny)

    by heatdeath ( 217147 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:26PM (#14476118)
    it's nice to see that someone is going to finally make it so I stop burning my lunch.

    Well, no, it'll just help regulate the temperature more accurately. It's still up to you to remember to stop playing doom 3 and go rescue your omlette from becoming a black crunchy lump.
    • A stove that communicates with the pots via RFID has enough micro-electronics inside to contain a clock, maybe a scheduler even! Mom can place the pan there, it'll heat up in time and signal you via WLAN, Bluetooth or SMS, so you know when food is ready! What a pointless waste...
    • Re:ummm... (Score:2, Interesting)

      It's still up to you to remember to stop playing doom 3 and go rescue your omlette from becoming a black crunchy lump.

      No, it'll tell when it's done and turn off the heat, right?
    • Re:ummm... (Score:2, Interesting)

      by SEWilco ( 27983 )
      No, if the food comes with a cooking-chip then the stove should cook it and turn off the heat when it is done. Other than choosing food which does not say "stir often" you'll just have to keep the volume of your speakers turned down low enough so you can hear the stove beeping when it is done. Making a stovetop stirring robot is left as an exercise for the reader.

      I need an RFID-active oven or a pan on which a pizza can fit. And a pizza chip which knows how to tell the stovetop or the oven how to cook

    • Re:ummm... (Score:2, Funny)

      by Fatal67 ( 244371 )
      Actually, the obvious use for this would be int he modern kitchen where you can pull up the recipe and cooking instructions from a LCD in the wall / countertop / whatever. The HKPC (home kitchen PC)(TM) would communicate with the pots and pans and trigger an alert so you know what pot to use. The LCD mounted on the pot handle would display the name of the ingredient and how much you are supposed to put in it.

      The Pot(TM) and The Stove(TM) are in constant communication to control tempatures and times. Since
    • Re:ummm... (Score:2, Funny)

      by AndroidCat ( 229562 )
      Well... It could tell Doom and then all the monsters could laugh at you when it does burn. (Which would be nothing compared to RFID tags in your laundry and a reader in your washing machine. "Haha! Look he put red in with white again! Die pink boy! *BAP*BAP*BAP*!")
  • by eosp ( 885380 )
    Wouldn't you melt the chip? It _is_ metal, after all. (I learned the hard way with a Pop-Tart wrapper.)
    • This isn't microwave cookware. It's pots and pans for use on top of the stove. If you RTFS, you'll see that the RFID chip goes in the handle.
    • Wrappers don't work in the toaster either.

      All joking aside, this is one appliance that might benefit from that kind of control - however, I find the variation that I get (sometimes light, sometimes dark) far more interesting than if I'd get the same, exact, cookie-cutter result every single time. Perfection is boring.
      • perfection is also tasty.

        I get pretty much exactly the same result every time... charcoal. Hence, I think I might benefit from this. As would most likley restaurants, large familys, and all others who know that the taste is less in the condition of the food and more in the spices added and the ingredients used.

        charcoal goes pretty well with hot peppers.
  • by khasim ( 1285 ) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:26PM (#14476120)
    The people who would cook by plugging a card into a pot would not be using a pot in the first place. They'd be using a microwave.

    The people who cook with pots and pans already know how to cook so they won't spend money on this. Gas stoves are much better for cooking anyway.

    Which leaves the only market being people with too much money, a love for new toys and no culinary skills.
    • I can see this being useful in commercial kitchens, where the chef may be cooking multiple meals concurrently.
      • by Anonymous Coward
        A chef who can't keep track of multiple orders/dishes/burners won't be a chef for long.
    • Which leaves the only market being people with too much money, a love for new toys and no culinary skills. ...which explains why it's on /., I guess.
    • by jandrese ( 485 ) * <kensama@vt.edu> on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:43PM (#14476199) Homepage Journal
      I can see this being something of a safety feature too, if you have the "greasy food" item in your pan, it won't let the temperature exceed the flashpoint of the oil you're using (minus some for contaimination) and you'll never have an oil fire again.

      I have to admit though, this seems like gadetry overkill for even me, and I'm a hardcore geek.
      • I agree. The only thing this would be really good for is deep-frying. Which then brings up the question: how does this mechanism improve upon existing designs for automatic deep-fryers? It's probably much more expensive and less durable than the old designs (most of which just use a thermocouple to control a heating element or a gas burner) and doesn't provide any new functionality.
    • Yes indeed. Why not just go get some microwave food at the store if you can't cook?

      Somehow, I find this pretty sad. People don't want to learn anything. Cooking is a great skill to learn, and it's fun to learn. 95% of it is following the directions. I suppose having a chip in there makes it easier to surf the net while cooking? (not that surfing in the kitchen is a good idea...)
      • Somehow skill of which "95% is following the directions" doesnt look "great" or even "fun" to me :/
        • That is sad. I'm not saying I'm a cook. But I do know how to cook things, and I have many, many times cooked things following the directions on how to cook them. It's not hard, it just requires following the steps.

          To be a real cook, now, that is really something. I had a girlfriend who was a cook, and it was incredible how she could make things taste better. Simple things, like hamburgers. She'd add some spices to the meat and......yum!
    • Saying that "gas is better for cooking" is only true if you're talking about traditional electric cooktops. Induction is superior to gas. See http://inductioncooking.wikispaces.com/AboutInduct ion [wikispaces.com] (disclaimer: I maintain that website, although the information is collected from various sources).

      That said, I don't see a lot of use for a pre-programmed cooking routine. It will only work when you can guarantee the consistency of your ingredients (making caramel or deep frying come to mind, but there are already
      • To take the thought further, the only place I could see this being really useful is in pre-packaged heat and serve style food. Just embed another chip in the packaging which contains the instructions for heating. Waving the chip by the stove's RFID scanner will program the cooking cycle, with the pots measuring temperature to make sure everything's going right. Stirring would be sort of a problem, unless you incorporated some sort of inductive stirring similar to some chemlab hotplates. Just coat the ma
    • The people who would cook by plugging a card into a pot would not be using a pot in the first place. They'd be using a microwave.

      And in the UK we already have microwave ovens that can read the cooking instructions [checkoutmagazine.co.uk] and automagically cook your food as intended by the producer.
    • Wait a second. IASWCC(I Am Someone Who Can Cook) Did anyone notice that this monitors the temperature of the *pan* and not the food?

      Will you have to have diffrent recipe cards for each weight and temperature of the food being prepared (frozen, room temp, etc)?

      The pan may be at the correct temperature but that is kinda useless as most cookware conducts heat so well that it is effectively the same temperature as the element anyway, so is this basicaly saying you still have to be there to cook the meal it
      • I am also in the 'someone who can cook' category, and this device does seem useful to me. The temperature regulation thing seems like a gimmick, but having the ring automatically turn itself off when I remove the pan would be useful, since it's something I forget to do periodically, which shortens the life time of the heating element.
    • You know, you can't get a stove that puts out BTUs like a professional chef's stove. Induction cooking allows you to achieve those kinds of heat outputs (as it only heats the cookware, not the stove, walls neat the stove, etc) in your own kitchen.

      That's why I want induction cooking - I can't stir fry food in a wok nearly as well as I'd like with my wimpy consumer stove. As for RFID to control temperature - that might be really useful interested in holding food at a certain temperature to cook, like in vac
      • Shameless plug (not that I make any money from it -- wikispaces gets all the revenue from the google ads): In case you didn't see my other post, I've got a wiki up about induction cooking at inductioncooking.wikispaces.org. There is some interesting information there about ordering cooktops from Europe (I'm assuming you are in N.A., so ignore this if you aren't), where you can acquire nicer European models with higher power than the N.A. stuff at far lower prices (even after paying for shipping). Colin
    • Which leaves the only market being people with too much money, a love for new toys and no culinary skills. 2 out of 3 ain't bad.
  • Nothing "needs" this amount of control...Oh, but the flavor!
  • Taco (Score:5, Funny)

    by truthsearch ( 249536 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:32PM (#14476149) Homepage Journal
    It's nice to see that someone is going to finally make it so I stop burning my lunch.

    Scary thought for someone named after a food...
    • You actually think Taco refers to Mexican sandwiches?

      Hint, Pronounced "Command her"
      • And I thought they were referring to the submitter, haggiz. But then again, most people outside of Scotland might not consider that to be food (nevermind the alternative spelling.)
  • Nice (Score:2, Funny)

    by kryten_nl ( 863119 )
    Nice, now the industrial complex will know if I like my eggs baked or boiled.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:35PM (#14476173)
    Which insures the identity of your cookware and that only legal US plates are used and that taxes are paid. The RealPlate act will insure that your china is not made in China and that only US knifes and forks labor to cut your meat.
  • by Brento ( 26177 ) <brento@bre[ ]zar.com ['nto' in gap]> on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:36PM (#14476174) Homepage
    The next thing would be pantry integration. I'd like to pick out a stack of recipe cards, drop them into a pile, and have the system figure out what I need to buy versus what I've already got - especially since it could link with RFID tags of the stuff in my cupboard. Granted, it won't know which items are full and which are empty, so it won't know if I've got enough vegetable oil for the particular recipe, but it can always print out a list of exceptions that I could investigate.

    Then, I need it to integrate with my wine cellar, so it can see whether I've got an appopriately matching wine for each of the recipes.

    And it'd obviously have an internet connection, so it could check prices on each of the ingredients. I could put in my work address and my girlfriend's work address, and it could balance out the list and prices so it could SMS me (or her, depending on the shop) right before I leave work.

    Ha! This is Slashdot! Who am I kidding? I don't have a girlfriend, a wine cellar OR a job! Much less RFID cookware, bwahaha. Now pass me that pizza delivery menu.
    • Actually, that's a great idea. Or, rather the converse of that is a great idea.

      Imagine a method of having the fridge, cubboard and stove use RFID to keep an up to date list of what you can make based on what you have. Plus with a "if you had" list.

      It just pulls from a database with ingredients, cooking time and estimated remaining volume and displays it. You wouldn't need to update it more than daily or hourly at most.

      Half the time I end up staring at my full fridge, wondering what I want to eat and end
    • Why not take the 2 minutes and look for yourself? What happens the day you lose power? Or are hit by a storm that knocks out all your electricity? Are you going to starve to death? Sounds like it....go Darwin! Go!
      • What happens the day you lose power? Or are hit by a storm that knocks out all your electricity? Are you going to starve to death?

        My post was a *joke*, Sherlock. Besides, I live on Miami Beach, two blocks from the ocean's edge. I went through three hurricanes last fall including Katrina, Rita and Wilma, and had no power for a while. I lived. Deal with it.
    • Ha! This is Slashdot! Who am I kidding? I don't have a girlfriend, a wine cellar OR a job! Much less RFID cookware, bwahaha.
      Dem Übergeek himself has got both a wine cellar, a wife (aka. girlfriend v. 2.0) and a job... why shouldn't you have it too ?
  • For those of you puzzled by this story, you should be, as it's basically bogus.

    They're talking about inductive heating, which is a bit worrisome: It involves having a kilowatt or so of 13.56 MHz radio frequency energy beamin up at the cooking implement.

    The pot can't be just any pot-- it has to hit a certain electromagnetic sweet spot, as to absorb the radio waves, and not reflect them all over the place.

    this usually implies it has to be made of somewhat resistive and lossy material-- iron is a good c

    • by Avumede ( 111087 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @02:11PM (#14476293) Homepage
      Actually, cast iron has wonderfully even heating, better than almost anything else out there. However, because of it's poor conductivity, you have to let it sit on the stove for a bit for the temperature to even out.

      One of the best restaurants in the world, The French Laundry, uses induction stoves instead of gas stoves.
      • With exception of copper.

        Which is what is used in the best french restaurants in France.

        The main problems with copper is the "maintenance" : it's hard to clean, and has to be polished quite often. But it has the best conduction for cooking, with a nice even diffusion.

        Also you cannot as yet use them on induction stoves (as far as I know...I'm not that much a cookware geek)

        Induction is top for a few application : boiling water under 30 seconds, changing temperature of your pan really fast...

        Induction IS top h
      • You're in luck - all the Grammar Nazis are busy at the top of this thread!
    • I have an induction hob, its really great, the only downside is the need to buy induction compatible sauce-pans (which are pretty common). Induction hobs have the advantage that they are never hot to the touch, nothing burns onto them. They cook a perfectly even heat moreso than any other type of cooker.
    • Induction cooking requires the use of a ferrous cookware. Iron and steel can get hot enough to really sear something. The addition of iron scraped off into the diet is actually a nutritional plus. Stainless steel has always had problems with scorching, even the copper aluminum sandwich kind.

      Copper, glass, aluminum etc are useless for induction schemes. We use copper, steel and aluminum so this technology is out for us. Good pans should be able to cook every meal you eat in your lifetime and then some.

      I th

    • This operates at 171KHz, not 13.56 MHz. Personally, I would not be too worried about all this. [richieburnett.co.uk] In addition, it is fast and efficient. As far as a kilowatt of power, well, back in the late 60's, my father bought a Litton Microwave Oven (one of the first for consumers). A number of ppl swore that we would lose our eyes, would explode from being heated inside out, or would have funny looking kids. They lost.
      • Thanks for the correction in frequency.

        The difference between this and a microwave oven is the microwaves are confined (99.98% of them) to inside the oven cavity.

        In a stove, the RF energy isnt confined by anything tangible. The confinement depends on magnetic fields dropping off as the third power of the distance.

        I just thought it was funny how companies can spin this as a super new feature, when others might see it as a kludge to overcome some inherent probs.

    • They're talking about inductive heating, which is a bit worrisome: It involves having a kilowatt or so of 13.56 MHz radio frequency energy beamin up at the cooking implement.

      The pot can't be just any pot-- it has to hit a certain electromagnetic sweet spot, as to absorb the radio waves, and not reflect them all over the place.

      This usually implies it has to be made of somewhat resistive and lossy material-- iron is a good choice.

      No, Although 13.56 MHz is an RF ISM band and used for various purposes (such as
    • If you read the wikipedia article on induction cooking [wikipedia.org] you'd know that induction cookers mainly rely on magnetic hysteresis heating rather than eddys, and thus you need to use something with a large loop. Conductivity doesn't come into it - you could use suitable non conductive ferrites without significant effect. Also, there is no reason why you couldn't add a copper layer for heat spreading if it is important.
  • RFID??? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by dnoyeb ( 547705 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:41PM (#14476194) Homepage Journal
    This has nothing to do with RFID really. RFID is just an ID. This is a nice temperature monitoring device. I have see other wireless units for sale but none built into the Pot like this.

    Its a clever idea that I can see being used for testing out cooking techniques. However, using the term RFID is just to hype the produce as it really is not getting that much out of the RFID technology.
    • Looks like they just used RFID to monitor the type of pan. I guess that could be useful with the differences in conductivity, density, etc of each. My 3-year-old's play kitchen does this sort of thing, already, though. When you place the plastic eggs on it, it crackles, the spaghetti, it bubbles.

      Sounds like some XML-enabled, service-oriented, 4-gl buzzwords being thrown around to me. *g*

  • 1: Come up with crappy inductive heating cookware/stove combo. 2: ??? 3: Make liberal use of the term RFID in marketing hype 4: Post slashvertisement 5: Profit!
  • by Sponge Bath ( 413667 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:49PM (#14476224)

    Even temperatures would benefit gourmet cooks more than inattentive college students trying not to burn their mac and cheese. Precise cooking temperatures without large swings command premium dollars.

    Just check out this [aga-ranges.com] for the extremes people will go to for this kind of control.

    • That was exactly what I was thinking. For those not aware...certain foods, particularly french ones, tend to require exact timing and temperatures so as not to ruin it. Pretty much all egg recipes could benefit from this, as could crepes, sauces, and anything else that requires such accuracy.

      Of course...the chefs serious enough to care about those things, such as myself, are typically at a culinary skill level where they do just fine without expensive gadgets. Although the industrial kitchens of restaura

  • Getting one of these chips into a vapourizer would be a neat idea. Hardware hackers with free time should get working. Everybody must get stoned.
  • Now you can fry your RFID chip, literally!
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Chocolate, candies, and sauces come to mind. Especially chocolate.

    Cocao butter in chocolate melts around 90F. Ideal melting temperature is between 40-45C (104-113F). Above that (45C, 115F), the chocolate scorches.

    For tempering (the shiny coatings), you melt it at around 110F, cool it to 79-80F, and then warm it back to 90F. Automating it is very handy.

    Candies (and related sauces) are very temperature sensitive. Sugar melts at 146C (367F). Just right and you get caramel. Just wrong and you get carbon.
  • English (Score:3, Funny)

    by quokkapox ( 847798 ) <quokkapox@gmail.com> on Sunday January 15, 2006 @01:57PM (#14476249)
    It's basically pots and pans that you can place RFID cooking cards in the handle with.

    ENGLISH, CmdrTaco, ENGLISH! ! !

    I only use one button on my microwave oven, MinutePlus. My mom always wonders how I get it to turn on by pressing one button without typing in the amount of time...

  • It's is a tool that is used for monitoring and tracking.
    All I want, and a lot of folks I have tlaked to, is laws in place to prevent abuse. Unfortuunatly they are easy to abuse.

  • This is certainly a new twist in dealing with all of those exploding [elchingadero.com] meth labs [dailycamera.com].
  • an ambulance drives by and scrambles the signal?

    It'll burn your house down?

    --
    "Officer, you must be drunk."
  • this seems more like a thing for microwaves or ovens for TV dinners. maybe scan the box and insert frozen crap? that may be nice if your internet connected oven could have its characteristics tune the cooking instructions. does this already exist? anyway, it's not for me, i like to actually cook.
    food you cook in a pot or pan does not seem like it would benefit from this. there are so many variables in cooking (like how often you stir it!) that come into play, plus a little variety is what makes cooking have
  • When used on a stove, Teflon can burn. While the fumes can't be good for humans, they are incredibly lethal for pet birds. Most parrot owners cannot use Teflon-coated pans.

    RFID cards that tell the stove to turn off after a certain amount of time would help prevent mistakes with Teflon pans.

    Better would be pans with sensors that monitor the temperature of the pans used. Not only would it be safer, but it would be easier to control temperatures of food being cooked.

  • ..will pan out boom tish

    Interesting idea, can it alter temperatures per pot on the stove? so my meat sauce cooks on high then simmers while something else does a controlled slow cook? Nice vendor lock in - you now have to buy pots, pans, skillets AND the stove they belong to.
  • ...since the German verb "ficken", which is homophonous to "FIQin" means "to fuck" and the prefix "er-", though not normally used with this verb, usually designates a successful completion of the action indicated by the stem. Not a clever choice of letters.
  • If CmdrTaco wants to stop burning his lunch, he will stop making the same mistake nearly everyone else does when burning stuff: they forget that its cooking in the first place. Whenever you are burning something, I'd say roughly about 95% of the time it can be attributed to the fact that you forgot it was cooking in the first place or were otherwise engaged elsewhere (playing a video game, doing a seperate cooking step, etc) and you missed your time cue to remove the food from the heat source. So what you r
  • by Dun Malg ( 230075 )
    HaggiZ writes "Vitacraft are claiming to have what they call RFIQin Robotic Cookware (unfortunate name). It's basically pots and pans that you can place RFID cooking cards in the handle with.

    Hey HaggiZ, "RFIQ" != "RFID". Seriously, there are a lot of people out there calling anything small that passively or with minimal self-powering communicates via RF radiation (i.e. radio waves) "RFID". RFID is a specific thing. It's basically a small, cheap device that echoes back a unique ID number for tracking purpo

    • How did this get modded informative?

      I know, this is Slashdot, but didn't anyone look at the linked page? You know, the one that starts with "Each Vita Craft pan handle is embedded with an RFID computer chip..."
  • by Animats ( 122034 ) on Sunday January 15, 2006 @03:46PM (#14476832) Homepage
    A more useful idea would be a wireless temperature probe that worked in, and with, a microwave oven. Then, when you're cooking something thick, like a chicken breast, the oven could sense interior temperature. Traditional ovens have had this since the 1950s, but microwave ovens usually have not.

    There would certainly be no problem powering the thing; there's plenty of RF power in there. Interference could be overcome by programming the oven to shut off for a few milliseconds every second, during which period the probe would send a temp reading.

    • I'm sure I've seen microwave ovens with temp probes. I could be wrong though. I have usually just bought whatever $100 microwave whenever I moved. Never had one fail, and never used any feature of one except "put on high, enter the time, press start". Not even sure I've ever cleaned one.
  • +/- 50 degrees isn't going to ruin your dinner. What IS critical is stirring technique. I doubt I'd get much use out of RFID cookware.
  • It would be quite useless. I am always aware about the temp of my food cooking, either on the XBox 360 PSU (also useful as a foot warmer in bed) and on my overclocked intel (great for pot noodle) using the motherboard temperature sensors ;)

    I actually think it could be feasible to harness all that wasted heat from electronic equipment to cook food

    http://petantik.blogsome.com/ [blogsome.com] - A Lucid Look at Reality
    http://www.xanga.com/petantik [xanga.com] - The Golden Nugget
    • I actually think it could be feasible to harness all that wasted heat from electronic equipment to cook food
      Nah... it makes it taste funny...
  • The best thing you can do is purchase some solid stainless steel cookware (like Allclad) and get one piece of non-stick for cooking eggs.

    With this compu-cookware, what happens when you want to finish a dish in the oven?

    I would like to see how long this stuff last at 450 degrees.

    All this technology will never replace stirring, thermometer, and following directions.

    Good stainless steel pans will last longer than you do and will be always reliable.

    People will buy the stupidist stuff to "help" them cook, when t
    • Large operations will benefit. When you've got to feed hundereds of people in one shot, and need it all cooked consistently... every little bit helps.

      I'd agree that its not all that useful at home, but large restaurants, cafeterias, military mess halls... could really benefit from the added consistency such devices can give.
  • This looks like it works best only if you want one single temperature, instead of a range, while cooking something. If I start something on low, then turn it up when I add something, but only want it to boil for a second, or whatever, I would have to keep swapping out cards, or bypass this, right?
  • Now the (NSA/FBI/CIA/Insert favorite American spook agency here) is going to know what you're eating and how hot it is so they don't burn themselves when they come in your house through the kitchen windows. Or they will know what exactly they have to poison in your local grocery store to kill you specifically.

    Or your (neighbours/parents/mother-in-law) can come in and ask if they can join you for your famous meatloaf without even asking them!
  • Ok, so I really wanted to create an RFID product, since it seems like such a useful thing, but I have no idea where to get started with manufacturers or suppliers. Can anybody recommend some resources? What I've basically planned to do (and will use this post as prior art if necessary) is create a home tracking system for things in your house that you can sync up to a cellphone or a computer and basically locate things instantaneously.

    Can anybody offer suggestions?

  • by Loundry ( 4143 )
    I visited the website, and I think this is marketing. The most important measurement of temperature in cooking food is the internal temperature of high-mass items such as steaks. The temperature reading which is important is the innermost part of the thickest steak in the pan. How is an RFID tag in the pan going to measure that? Answer: it isn't. Only a thermocouple probe can cut that job, which is why I have two different thermocouples in my kitchen that I use almost every time I cook.

    Another part of

"Card readers? We don't need no stinking card readers." -- Peter da Silva (at the National Academy of Sciencies, 1965, in a particularly vivid fantasy)

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