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Google Launches Google Print 245

Rescate writes "As reported by Reuters,Google is launching Google Print, which will show book excerpts next to regular Google search results. A spokesman said, "We're trying to index every book there is, and make it searchable for our users." Even though this competes with Amazon's A9 search which also searches within books, Google says the two companies will continue to work together, and that Google Print will link to Amazon, as well as other sellers, to buy books listed in the search results. Google will demonstrate the technology Thursday, Oct. 7 at the Frankfurt Book Fair."
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Google Launches Google Print

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  • See also... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:13PM (#10455192)
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:15PM (#10455209)
    Google is really reaching for markets now.
    What's next? - Google searching our hard drive? Oh wait ...
    • by 404 Clue Not Found ( 763556 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:45PM (#10455414)
      Why is this a stretch? Google's mission is to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful". That's exactly what they're trying to do here.

      Books are just the next logical step. You seem to think this is bad thing for Google to pursue... why? For in-depth looks at any particular topic, books are probably still the best way to go (many web articles are just too short). There's a lot of information archived in print form and digitizing it will just make it easier and quicker to find. (And yes, I know Amazon did this first... that's not the point here.)

      Eventually, maybe they can even do video search. Archiving the world's newscasts, documentaries, movies, what have you and allowing you to find clips of the information you're searching for. Looking for a quote from a movie or from a politician? Just type it in and bam, you see the clip.

      Our hard drives, on the other hand... I don't understand why you'd need Google for that. Don't people already organize information the way they want (using folders, filenames, etc.) on their own computers? And when that fails, a filename or full-text search can already be done by the operating system...
      • Our hard drives, on the other hand... I don't understand why you'd need Google for that. [snip] a filename or full-text search can already be done by the operating system.

        Yes, but spectacularly badly. So badly in fact, that in practice most people don't do it. Google, Microsoft and Yahoo are pursuing desktop search because they realize just what a chasm there is between a "proper" search engine, and what's available right now for personal search.

        If you've only got a few dozen docs and a few hundred emails

      • Web searches are useful because you can instantly download any hits returned by the search.

        print.google.com sounds more like... geez, what did they call those microfiche that indexed the content of magazines and journals? I can't even remember. Anyway, 80% of the time they were more frustrating that useful because the library didn't carry the journal in question.

        I mean, really, what are you supposed to do with these search results? Buy every book that looks promising and wait a couple weeks until the

      • Yeah, but I'd really like to see Google fix the existing search problems. I'm starting to have to use other search engines to find stuff because of google-bombers. I really like Google, but finding stuff like product reviews or programming information is real chore with google web search. Groups is a different beast.
  • by mfh ( 56 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:15PM (#10455211) Homepage Journal
    Google will demonstrate the technology Thursday, Oct. 7 at the Frankfurt Book Fair.
    Now there is a clever piece of irony. Google is pioneering toward a paperless library and they show it off at a book fair. Authors will surely love this technology while publishers might not like it if it makes them redundant. How many of you remember the musty smell of an old library filled with books? Today's libraries have improved, yet tomorrow's libraries may have no books at all, only a small cube in the middle of it that wifis texts to people from their homes. It's only a matter of time before we don't need to scan thousands of pages to write papers (or even learn something for that matter), and it will make everyone much more productive and intelligent. Publishers have pretty much accepted electronic book formats, so what's wrong with the RIAA and the MPAA?
    • Publishers have pretty much accepted electronic book formats, so what's wrong with the RIAA and the MPAA?

      I think they have got digital formats already...
      *continues watching Shrek on DVD*
    • ...libraries may have no books at all, only a small cube in the middle of it that wifis texts to people from their homes.

      I've thought about this before as well. I think the two things that libraries do have going for them are those who cannot afford net connections themselves, and the fact that reading something on paper is still easier than reading something on the screen. Of course Xerox's e-paper could also take care of the latter while free net connections could take of the former, thus allowing your prediction to come true faster than I would think.

      There are many out there, myself included, who will never get rid of books. They are just too cool to ever be fully rid of. Of course if there is some type of massive paper famine in a couple years or so, that will change I'm sure, but I have a very hard time parting with any of my books.

    • by Planky ( 761118 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:25PM (#10455279) Homepage
      I believe books themselves will never die, ebooks are great as a delivery service and are incredibly useful for research - but it won't ever extend to novels and the like. So certain aspects of the libraries we know today wont exist - but a large part of it will.

      • I agree, I've got access to a "virtual library" at school that will let me search plenty (1000's) of tech books from many different subjects. PHP to Active Directory is covered.

        Problem is however that I can't hold it, take it to the bathroom, or glance at it when I'm typing. Really sucks.

        I've only used it maybe 3 times for school and every other time I prefer web sites that are actually formatted for the screen.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:25PM (#10455283)
      Actually, from a small university press point of view, I think this technology is great. Sure, you can see a few pages from one of our books, but if the subject is interesting and the book is useful, we're hoping people buy the whole thing. This doesn't make us redundant, it gives us another way to market books. Since many of our books are very specialized, (think monograph), it can be difficult to get them to the people who need the information.
      • This is exactly google's idea. Read the link, you might want to sign up for this and do business with them. Your entire book will NOT be put online. However, if something good comes up, I can read the excerpt and then click the "buy this book!" link and voila, everyone wins.

        Yet another ingenious google idea!

    • When we get rid of books there will be nothing to prove something did or didn't happen. someone could change history on Googles index and we wouldn't have anything to prove it wrong.
    • by Psychotext ( 262644 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @08:18PM (#10455652)
      No No NO! Some of us actually like musty old libraries. I dont know why but I have always felt a aura of knowledge when I walk into a good library and despite being a tech-head in every sense of the word I would be the last one standing to ensure they keep books in paper format - AND AS MANY AS POSSIBLE.

      I dont know... I just sit in front of these damn screens for so many hours. Nothing seems to go in anymore. I read document after document, online papers, articles, blogs. None of it seems to have the same weight as a decent book that I can read without distraction, whether that is in the corner of my house or a library quiet room. Maybe it's because half of the content out there is rubbish (Publishers actually do something you know!) or maybe it's just the format, but I really don't like electronic books.

      I'll live without it thank you, and I'll thank you to stay away from my musty books. This isn't progress!
  • hold up (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:15PM (#10455212)
    so many google features, why no porn.google.com? :o(
    • That would be google image search.
    • Yeah yeah, mod this as funny, but this is the best idea google hasn't done yet. The porno industry makes so much money that it can barely be put into words. That's surprising to hear, but not everyone wants to deal with the latest kazaa or whatever to get their porn, and many people have specialized fetishes.

      Regardless, I think google has the technology and business practicality to make a killing on pornography. Either way, I'm still a huge google fan.

  • Launched? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by richcoder ( 539438 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:15PM (#10455213)
    I always thought that launched meant that the site was up and running? All I see is a FAQ page.
  • Gutenberg (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ryan Stortz ( 598060 ) <ryan0rz AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:17PM (#10455219)
    Will Google by any chance be using any of Project Gutenberg's [promo.net] texts?
    • Re:Gutenberg (Score:4, Interesting)

      by mrchaotica ( 681592 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @08:11PM (#10455593)
      What I want to know is, how is Google getting these books into the computer? Are they using normal off-the-shelf OCR software and then correcting the errors by hand, like Project Gutenberg does? Wouldn't they have to hire a whole bunch of people for that, and wouldn't the people that are really interested in Google notice? Or, more interestingly, did they come up with some breakthrough in OCR technology?
      • Re:Gutenberg (Score:3, Interesting)

        by ralphclark ( 11346 )
        The way I read it, they are only planning to index books with the help of the publisher (thus avoiding copyright violation). Publishers will likely be able to supply the text in an electronic (and thus searchable) format. Should be do-able for any book currently in print.
      • Re:Gutenberg (Score:3, Insightful)

        by vena ( 318873 )
        hmm, google seems to be pretty good at determining what you were searching for even if you spell it incorrectly (and sometimes by a wild margin). i wonder if they would simply not need to correct the mistakes made by off-the-shelf OCR software for the purpose of indexing. Project Gutenberg exists so that people can read full texts and so a good amount of accuracy is important, it doesn't seem like that's Google's intention here.
    • I really hope they do. One reason I've dedicated time to the Gutenberg Project is that a number of the texts being scanned, proofread and given digitally released are out of print or incredibly difficult to find.

      Google could make 100% of GP project pages available instead just a few since most GP projects are in the public domain. It also would be a great philanthropic gesture for Google to sponsor PG's work, if they don't already.
  • by Eryximachus ( 819128 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:19PM (#10455231)
    I have always wanted to be able to grep a text when I was searching it for citations for an english paper.
    • Book indexing sure has advantages. The only thing I still have trouble understanding is how they do it. Not the searching or indexing, but the book scanning. They either get real good contacts with editors or they have a room filled with monkeys and scanners.

  • Good for google... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by discord5 ( 798235 )

    but what does it do for me? If I'm intrested in a book I go to amazon and a few other shops if I don't find it there. They have this search box on amazon, which is handy for finding what I need. Kind of like google, only on the site itself and on their database itself showing me how much they still have in stock, etc.

    I don't know, it just seems so reduntant to be able to do this on google as well now.

    • by jerometremblay ( 513886 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:39PM (#10455375) Homepage
      Why should you consult different places to search for different kinds of data? What google tries to achieve is to be your Unique Source of Answers, your first and last stop.

      One single unified interface to find anything you might think of. This is the ultimate goal of Google.

      It's good for the user because it's easy to learn.

      It's even better for Google, who litteraly ends up re-branding the whole world.
  • Copyright Concerns? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ravenspear ( 756059 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:20PM (#10455240)
    What kind of copyright concerns among publishers will this cause? I know Amazon received some opposition to their service and it seems that this is a step up from that. At least on Amazon the content was only available on one site and most people would probably come across it when looking to buy the book or ones similar to it. But with this, you could have copyrighted content suddenly becoming accessible on millions of searches from anywhere.

    • they share ad revenues with publishers

      this will help ;)
    • by moonbender ( 547943 ) <moonbender AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:43PM (#10455408)
      Judging by the FAQ, publishers send books to Google to get them scanned and indexed. I assume that when they send their books, they also agree to give Google a license to use the materials in the way described.

      That said, I'm still curious how this will work out. There are many issues. For one, it will have to gain a critical mass of books to be more than a novelty. And if it really works as described above, they rely on others to bring books to them. With anyone else, I'd be very sceptical, but Google does have the sheer brand power to actually get publishers to send in books. On the other hand, maybe sent in books are just part of it and they also index books out of their own volition, which as you said brings up copyright concerns.
      If that works out, I'm curious to see how they will enforce the viewing limitations. It says that you'll be able to view the two pages before and after the one you found. It also says it records data to track which books you've already seen, assumingly to prevent you from seeing more than those 5 or another number of pages of any book, ever. It does not say whether or not you're required to log in an account, but that would seem to be the only way to prevent people from simply refusing a cookie or clearing them to see another 5 pages. Of course, Google is using accounts for most of it's add-on services, at least as an option, but I think it'd be a first for an account required to gain access to a certain search engine feature.
      And of course even with accounts, they wouldn't be very safe at all from malignent users, who could run multiple accounts, or groups of users who pool their pages to get the whole thing. Granted, it would take many users and more importantly a lot of time to get a 300 page novel, but groups working together to violate copyrights using an enormous amount of technical know-how are hardly new to the Internet. It's probably simpler to just scan and OCR the whole thing yourself, though.
  • Google everything! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by ebrusky ( 819597 )
    Is it possible, while this is very cool, that google is getting to diverse to support its core business. Searching the internet for the best results.
  • camel (Score:5, Interesting)

    by mrpuffypants ( 444598 ) * <mrpuffypants@noSPAM.gmail.com> on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:20PM (#10455246)
    i want the entire oreilly catalog on there right now.

    I know it's already all in digital format, it's just a matter of emailing it to google.

    go, tim, go.
  • Example... (Score:5, Informative)

    by tommertron ( 640180 ) * on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:23PM (#10455261) Homepage Journal
  • Available *now* (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward
    The service is already available. Try searching for war and peace (no quotes). There will be separate link with books icon. Click on it and you can view book pages!!!
    Project Gutenberg isn't useful to Google because they display picture of every page. You can even see the book covers.
  • by ShatteredDream ( 636520 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:24PM (#10455270) Homepage
    Other tech and IP companies could really stand to learn from Google. They took what was originally a niche market and they have built it up and brought that market into new areas. One of the best things that Google did was make their search features customizable for individual websites. They aren't the first to do this, but they have been very good at making it fit in well with the websites that want to add search capabilities.

    Now what would be really sweet would be for Google to convince the music and movie industries to let it index song lyrics and movie scripts. That would be just another nail in the coffin for Google's competitors and it probably wouldn't be that difficult to do.
  • smart move (Score:4, Insightful)

    by xlyz ( 695304 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:25PM (#10455282) Journal
    especially the idea to share ad revenue with publishers

    it seems they are going to succeed again
  • by IGTeRR0r ( 805236 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:27PM (#10455291) Homepage
    Google Print Mirror [illuminedgaming.com]




    It's funny, laugh.
  • by lavar78 ( 573962 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:29PM (#10455306)
    On one hand, this is going to make it much easier for plagiarists. OTOH, it's going to make it much easier to catch them.
    • From the FAQ:
      What can I do with books that I find?
      Well, you can browse a few pages, learn more about the topics explored by the book, buy it, or commit a selection to memory. To further protect your book content, printing and image copying functions are disabled on all Google Print content pages.


      Everyone seems to be assuming that the book text will be there on the page as plain text. Nope -- it looks like it will be an image, and Google will be putting in whatever tech they can to prevent you from sav
  • by j. andrew rogers ( 774820 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:30PM (#10455315)
    From the standpoint of the publishers (and my girlfriend is a national sales manager for one of the very large publishers), this idea is incredibly bad and they have been extremely resistant to it. Amazon has been trying to push this for years without success, and it seems that now Google is getting in on the game. Or maybe Amazon is trying to use Google as additional weight to try and break the stubbornness of the publishers.

    The problem, ultimately, is that showing the page you are looking for, plus or minus two pages, is often all the pages you need to see for a great many bookes e.g. books that are randomly accessed in a reference fashion. As an example of this, my girlfriend routinely searches cookbooks online using this very feature. It shows her the recipe she was looking for from an expensive cookbook, and plus or minus a couple pages, which means she gets the entire recipes -- the primary benefit of the book -- online for free. And she uses this as an example of why her publishing houses won't participate.

    For STM publishers and similar, 90% of their product line could be used this way. Letting Amazon (or Google) give away book content in a searchable format five pages at a time would dramatically eat into their sales without generating any revenue. Most of the books you do see in this system are either 1) books from minor publishers too stupid to have thought this through, or 2) a very short list of throwaway books from major publishers to prove to Amazon and themselves that it actually eats sales rather than driving them -- the consensus of the publishing industry. It would have died a long time ago except that it is the pet project of someone high up in Amazon.

    • by sparkmanC ( 93863 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:52PM (#10455460)
      prove to Amazon and themselves that it actually eats sales rather than driving them

      Actually, having books online for browsing increases sales. Just think about going to the book store and paging through a book before you buy it... You are much less likely to buy a book that is shrink-wrapped, because you have no idea of the quality of the book.
    • Amazon has a lot of safeguards for the publishers that I do not see google putting in place. A) You actually have to log in with a valid account (I believe that means a valid Credit Card on file too) so see search inside the book pages. B) there is a fairly small maximum number of pages that can be looked at per day something like 20 pages TOTAL C) the books are displayed as images, not as text.
    • by Alomex ( 148003 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @08:51PM (#10455868) Homepage
      This is a standard example of a disruptive technology [wikipedia.org]. It introduces so many changes in the distribution model that publishers can't see a way to make a profit out of it.

      There are many ways to go around the problems described in the message from the publisher, but all of them require a re-thinking of the publishing business and their economic model.
    • You don't describe a very good value proposition being offered by the publishers. Books of the sort you describe sound like they will very easily be replaced by some kind of computer reference.

      How many dead tree encyclopedia's are being sold these days?

      Google seems to be pretty good at killing stupid business models, so I for one look forward to watching these particular dinosaurs die.
    • The problem, ultimately, is that showing the page you are looking for, plus or minus two pages, is often all the pages you need to see for a great many bookes e.g. books that are randomly accessed in a reference fashion. As an example of this, my girlfriend routinely searches cookbooks online using this very feature. It shows her the recipe she was looking for from an expensive cookbook, and plus or minus a couple pages, which means she gets the entire recipes -- the primary benefit of the book -- online fo
      • Recipe books are bought by several different groups of people, those seeking to enhance their coffee table are one of them. Another group is the cronically unconfident, who need to be told what they already know. A third group just likes dreaming of yummy things, this is the same market as travel books. A fourth group doesn't know anything about cooking and needs a book full of basic recipies. A fifth group already knows a lot about one cuisine but wants to see different techniques. A sixth group wants
    • Why do publishers believe it's an all or nothing proposition? Surely they can make books available on a case by case basis? Your (her) objection doesn't apply in many cases, e.g. fiction.

      Most of the books you do see in this system are either 1) books from minor publishers too stupid to have thought this through, or 2) a very short list of throwaway books from major publishers to prove to Amazon and themselves that it actually eats sales rather than driving them -- the consensus of the publishing industry

  • It seems that Google, Amazon, et. al. are really pushing the envelope when it comes to the availability of information. The ability to search through books digitally, regardless of copyright infringment, is just one more step of centralizing the computer as the sole portal of information. While libraries and other brick and mortar organizations are certainly not fading into oblivion anytime soon, it is really encouraging to see further social progression of the use and importance of computers. The more t
  • Piracy (Score:2, Informative)

    by b0lt ( 729408 )
    No... you CAN'T read a book through this.
    From Google Print's FAQ:

    Can I read an entire book online?

    No, afraid not. Google Print is designed to help you discover books, not read them from start to finish. It's like going to a bookstore and browsing - only with a Google twist. Google searches across entire books in order to find the pages that are most relevant to your search. Once you're on a book page, you can 'flip' two pages forward and back, view other information about the book and even conduct ano
    • Re:Piracy (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Actually, you CAN.

      Example:

      I search for the book, go to the first page. I then download/save the next two pages. Then, I search for a line of text on the second page, go to that page, and then have the NEXT two pages available to me. If I keep doing this, I can read the entire book, although it may take a while.
    • >> It's like going to a bookstore and browsing

      GBrowser!

  • by QuantumG ( 50515 ) <qg@biodome.org> on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:42PM (#10455398) Homepage Journal
    One could say that Google has a monopoly on web search technology. With Google launching all these different services, aint they using that monopoly in one market to enter another? Isn't that against anti-trust laws? Isn't that was the Microsoft case was all about?
  • Ah yes. I want my google search results in print format. Absolutely brilliant [bbspot.com].

    (for the humor impaired, the above is a joke)
  • Hmm (Score:3, Interesting)

    by smclean ( 521851 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:49PM (#10455445) Homepage
    I'm not sure this is a good thing. When I search google I'm not looking for information which I could have in a week or two if I shell out $30. I'm looking for information that is free that I can have right now. It'd be one thing if these results would appear in the advertisements bar, or if you could disable them (actually it should be that you have to *en*able them), but all in all I get the feeling this will end up watering down the usefulness of google search results I receive by interspersing what I'm really not interested in.

    If google were interested in following "Don't be evil", wouldn't they make this feature a seperate search form, rather than placing their advertisements right in the middle of my search results?

    Maybe I just misunderstand.. Correct me if I'm wrong

    • Re:Hmm (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mdfst13 ( 664665 )
      Why wait a week? Just read the excerpt on the content page. Or get the book off your shelf (yes, it can include books that you already have). Or go to the library and get the book. Or have Amazon overnight it.

      If you RTFL ( http://print.google.com/googleprint/about_example . html ), these aren't "advertisements;" they're actual excerpts and descriptions of the book. It might even contain the info that you want (e.g. a quotation). The advertisements are on the side (left rather than right) of the linke
  • Why would Google do what Amazon already claimed a few years ago? It seems like lately, Google is gobbling up anything *remotely* releated to search. It's just a big blob of search-madness.
  • by iamacat ( 583406 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @07:57PM (#10455496)
    The whole point of search engines is to index publically available information. If I click on a link and have to pay to see the match of my search, the power of casual research on Internet is gone.

    Let them put that in sponsored results if they want, but I don't think anyone will buy the stuff.How do I know the books is good if I can not look at portions of it I consider important in a bookstore?
    • I couldn't agree more. This seems to me to be an awfully touchy move for google. Depending on how "good" their google print service is at serving me up convenient advertisements for books, I might just go find me another less spammy search engine.

      My brand loyalty for google dies the second they waste as much of my time as it takes me to change my bookmarks and firefox search engines to point to a less spammy search engine.

  • OK, I know that google says on the FAQ that the ability to print and copy images on their book pages is disabled, and if you re-enable the context menu, you just get a clear 1 by 1 image if you try to copy it, but it makes it pretty pointless if you can just go to view->source, find this section:

    ".theimg { background-image:url("http://print.google.com/pri n t?id=[really long semi-gibberish name]")"

    and copy the url, obtaining a plain image that you can do whatever you want with... uhm, within the law,
  • by yeremein ( 678037 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @08:28PM (#10455717)
    From the FAQ [google.com]:
    5. What can I do with books that I find?


    Well, you can browse a few pages, learn more about the topics explored by the book, buy it, or commit a selection to memory. To further protect your book content, printing and image copying functions are disabled on all Google Print content pages. (emphasis added)

    Google for Mastering Digital Photography [google.com] and you'll see a Google Print link up front. The page is shown as a graphic, with search hits highlighted in yellow. Google somehow (probably a though a CSS hack) manages to substitute a 1x1 white pixel .GIF file for the page if you try to print it or copy its location. They also disable the browser's context menu on the entire page (not just over the image), although Mozilla can deny it the right to do that (Prefs | Advanced | Scripts & Plugins).

    I'm not sure I like this. This is fairly innocuous (they can't stop a screen capture), but it still bothers me a bit that a company whose motto is "Do No Evil" is dabbling in DRM...
    • Page Limit (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      After about 20 pages... 5 clicks in the table of context, the cover, index and perhaps two actual pages of content:

      Thank you for using Google Print.

      You have either reached a page that is unavailable for viewing or reached your viewing limit for this book.

      Google protects works that are under copyright by restricting access to certain pages and restricting the number of pages you can view. You may continue to take advantage of Google Print by clicking on About this Book. Thank you for using Google P
    • by Anonymous Coward
      Google somehow (probably a though a CSS hack) manages to substitute a 1x1 white pixel .GIF file for the page if you try to print it or copy its location. They also disable the browser's context menu on the entire page (not just over the image), although Mozilla can deny it the right to do that (Prefs | Advanced | Scripts & Plugins).

      First, they set display:none; on the containing div for media:print. Second, the image is a css background-image, which may be hard to grab with the context menu. (and yo
  • I actually preferred Amazon's default search algorithm before they introduced "Search Inside the Book", because it limited its searches to the bibliographic data. Now when I do a search I get lots of books that contain the words I'm searching for, but that's not usually what I want. Annoying, and I have to go to the advanced search page for what I want.

    I think keeping Google's Web index separate from the Print index is a good thing, based on this experience.

    Eric
    Why the Vioxx recall is good for Google [ericgiguere.com]

  • Augmented Memory (Score:3, Interesting)

    by FrenZon ( 65408 ) * on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @08:35PM (#10455767) Homepage

    One of the problems I have with reading books is that I'm so used to using my PC to augment my memory (that is, I use search instead of remembering things), that when I read a book and come across a name, I instinctively want to Ctrl-F it to find the last occurence so I can fill my short-term memory with backstory on that character.

    Fortunately, amazon.com has full-text searching that gives you the page number of your query, making finding the last occurance super easy.

    Now we have this. Awesome++

  • Unless one has a truly excellent bookstore in the 'hood, it is difficult to browse by subject and discover books which one likes. One can do an on-line catalog search, or use Amazon's technology which finds clusters of related material, but these are limited in their efficacy. One thing I really, really like is citeseer ( http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/cs [psu.edu]), which identifies works which are similar (at the sentence level). The only shortcoming is that citeseer's domain is academic works. If Google manages t
  • A request to Google (Score:4, Interesting)

    by alphakappa ( 687189 ) on Wednesday October 06, 2004 @09:05PM (#10455964) Homepage
    If someone from Google is reading this:
    There are plenty of books that are out of print with no copyright restrictions on them. Since google has plenty of resources and aims to put all available information in the hands of users, would they please consider putting up the entire text of such books online? (Since there is no copyright on these books, there should be no '2 page backward -2 page forward' restrictions on them.)

    It would be awesome since there are some really great books which one cannot purchase anymore since they are out of print (unless you are really lucky and find them on eBay). Having Google put up full text versions (or pdf versions) would be the ultimate feature.
    • "There are plenty of books that are out of print with no copyright restrictions on them. Since google has plenty of resources and aims to put all available information in the hands of users, would they please consider putting up the entire text of such books online? "

      Project Gutenberg [gutenberg.net] already does this.

      Unfortunately, it doesn't seem as if Google can search Gutenberg texts. In this case, you could always download the texts from Gutenberg and index them yourself. Gutenberg texts have expired copyright

  • I was fumbling around with a mac mouse in a lab the other day and found some cool stuff about google.

    Basically with my ineptitude to use the one button mouse I accidently clicked on some whitespace in gmail or something and got to a login screen. I took a note of the URL so that I could post it on slashdot, but didn't keep up with my notes after my story got rejected.

    I logged in with my gmail info and was given access to the google store (really cool) and google answers (google answers is already know

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