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Medicine

Submission + - Got an Insanely Great Condom for Bill & Melinda Gates?

theodp writes: GeekWire reports that the Gates Foundation needs your help to design the next-gen rubber to help prevent STDs and unwanted pregnancy. As part of the foundation’s Grand Challenges Explorations initiative, people who have ideas to improve the use and effectiveness of condoms are encouraged to apply for a research grant, ideally to create a condom 'that men would prefer to no condom.' Last July, Melinda Gates pledged $560 million for contraception initiatives to address the health and social problems brought on by high rates of unplanned pregnancy.
News

Submission + - GoPro issues DMCA take down on product review it does not like (arstechnica.com)

skade88 writes: Ars is reporting that, GoPro, the company that makes cameras used in extreme sports such as sky diving and swimming with dolphins has issued a DMCA take down notice on a review At DigitalRev that they do not like. See DMCA notice here

From the article: "DigitalRev has a blog post up about the takedown, suggesting that most DMCA takedowns are "abusive" in nature. "We hope GoPro is not suggesting, with this DMCA notice, that camera reviews should be done only when they are authorized by the manufacturers," writes DigitalRev. "GoPro (or should we call you Go*ro instead?), we'd be interested to hear what you have to say" about the infringement notice."

Submission + - Truckload of OAuth issues that would make any author quit (blogspot.com) 5

DeFender1031 writes: Several months ago, when Eran Hammer ragequit the OAuth project, many people thought he was simply being overly dramatic, given that he gave only vague indications of what went wrong.

Since then, and despite that, many companies have been switching to OAuth, citing it as a "superior form of secure authentication" but a fresh and objective look at the protocol highlights the significant design flaws in the system and sheds some light on what might have led to its creator's breakdown.

Apple

Submission + - Apple: 75% of our world wide power needs now come from renewable power sources (apple.com)

skade88 writes: Wow! Color me green on this one! I am normally very critical of Apple's business practices, but this one is just perfect all around! Apple now owns and runs enough renewable energy power plants that 75% of their world wide power needs come from renewable sources such as wind, solar, geothermal and hydro.

From the Apple Blog Post: 'Our investments are paying off. We’ve already achieved 100 percent renewable energy at all of our data centers, at our facilities in Austin, Elk Grove, Cork, and Munich, and at our Infinite Loop campus in Cupertino. And for all of Apple’s corporate facilities worldwide, we’re at 75 percent, and we expect that number to grow as the amount of renewable energy available to us increases. We won’t stop working until we achieve 100 percent throughout Apple.'

Any other big power hungry data centers want to step up and join Apple on this one? Im looking at you Google and Rackspace!

Space

Submission + - Universe 100 million years older than previously thought (reuters.com)

skade88 writes: Reuters is reporting that scientists now say the universe is 100 million years older than previously thought after they took a closer look at leftover radiation from the Big Bang. This puts the age of the Universe at 13.8 billion years. The new findings are the direct results from analyzing data provided by the European Space Agency's Planck spacecraft. The spacecraft is providing the most detailed look to date at the remnant microwave radiation that permeates the universe.

"It's as if we've gone from a standard television to a high-definition television. New and important details have become crystal clear," Paul Hertz, NASA's director of astrophysics, told reporters on a conference call.

The Internet

Submission + - India Likely to Miss Internet Revolution Says Eric Schmidt (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Eric Schmidt has warned that India may very well miss the Internet revolution completely for the want of proper infrastructure and advancement in technology. Schmidt said he is worried that India is making the same mistake as other companies have made by resting on their “laurels without understanding how quickly technology changes.” By saying this Schmidt was indicating that India lacks in fiber optic connectivity, the connectivity which has been acknowledged as high speed Internet’s future. When asked by Managing Editor of CNBC TV 18, Senthil Chengalvarayan, why was the Internet Revolution side stepping India, he answered that India’s net connectivity has always been weak. There is lack of undersea cables to handle bandwidth, lack of fiber optic cables as well as proper infrastructure in the country.
Government

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Should Nations Have the Right to Kill Enemy Hackers? (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: "Cyber-attacks are much in the news lately, thanks to some well-publicized hacks and rising concerns over malware. Many of these attacks are likely backed in some way by governments anxious to seize intellectual property, or simply probe other nations’ IT infrastructure. But do nations actually have a right to fire off a bomb or a clip of ammunition at cyber-attackers, especially if a rival government is backing the latter as part of a larger hostile action? Should a military hacker, bored and exhausted from twelve-hour days of building malware, be regarded in the same way as a soldier with a rifle? Back in 2009, the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (which also exists under the lengthy acronym NATO CCD COE) commissioned a panel of experts to produce a report on the legal underpinnings of cyber-warfare. NATO CCD COE isn’t funded by NATO, and nor is it a part of that organization’s command-and-control structure—but those experts did issue a nonbinding report (known as “The Tallinn Manual on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Warfare”) exploring the ramifications of cyber-attacks, and what targeted nations can do in response. It's an interesting read, and the experts do suggest that, under circumstances, a nation under cyber-attack can respond to the cyber-attackers with "kinetic force," so long as that force is proportional. Do you agree, Slashdotters? Should nations have the ability to respond to cyber-attacks by taking out the hackers with a special-forces team or a really big bomb?"
Medicine

Submission + - Most GPs Prescribe Placebos (bbc.co.uk)

Techmeology writes: "In a survey of UK GPs, 97% said they'd recommended placebo treatments to their patients, with some doctors telling patients that the treatment had helped others without telling them that it was a placebo. While some doctors admitted to using a sugar pill or saline injection, some of the placebos offered had side effects such as antibiotic treatments used as placebos for vial infections."
Government

Submission + - DARPA wants unique automated tools to rapidly make computers smarter (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Researchers at DARPA want to take the science of machine learning — teaching computers to automatically understand data, manage results and surmise insights — up a couple notches. Machine learning, DARPA says, is already a the heart of many cutting edge technologies today, like email spam filters, smartphone personal assistants and self-driving cars. "Unfortunately, even as the demand for these capabilities is accelerating, every new application requires a Herculean effort. Even a team of specially-trained machine learning experts makes only painfully slow progress due to the lack of tools to build these systems," DARPA says."
NASA

Submission + - Political Pressure Pushes NASA Technical Reports Offline

Trepidity writes: "The extensive NASA Technical Report Archive was just taken offline, following pressure from members of U.S. Congress, worried that Chinese researchers could be reading the reports. U.S. Representative Frank Wolf (R-VA) demanded that "NASA should immediately take down all publicly available technical data sources until all documents that have not been subjected to export control review have received such a review", and NASA appears to have complied. Although all reports are in the public domain, there doesn't appear to be a third-party mirror available (some university libraries do have subsets on microfiche)."
Android

Submission + - We did not need Google's Schmidt to tell us Android and Chrome would not merge (networkworld.com)

Steve Patterson writes: Thankfully, Google Chairman Eric Schmidt has announced that "Android and Chrome will remain separate." Rumors that the products would be combined emerged last week when leadership of Android and Chrome were consolidated under Google Senior Vice President Sundar Pichai. Schmidt stated the obvious, but if you are a developer and you took the bait and thought the rumors might be true, you already read enough of Google Chrome or Google Android documentation before Schmidt’s clarification and confirmed that consolidating the two products would be, well, stupid.
Ubuntu

Submission + - Chinese open source community is brought into the global Ubuntu community (canonical.com)

GovCheese writes: Canonical, the software company that manages and funds Ubuntu, announced that the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology will base their national reference architecture for standard operating systems on Ubuntu, and they will call it Kylin. Arguably China is the largest desktop market and the announcement has important implications. Shuttleworth's phrasing of, “The release of Ubuntu Kylin brings the Chinese open source community into the global Ubuntu community,” will irk many who already feel Shuttleworth controversial, but the partnership further cements Ubuntu as an open-source influencer. This is a win for Ubuntu. Is it a win for the open-source community?
Technology

Submission + - Electrostatic Contamination in Your Devices (control.com)

interval1066 writes: "I noticed earlier my Vizio lcd monitor output suddenly getting brighter, then dimming back down to "normal" after a second. I've generally made it a practice to blow the dust out of my devices 1) when I remember to do so 2) after about 3 or so years of use 3) when I can get inside the case. My monitor is very thin and difficult to open. When I did finally crack it open I didn't really notice a whole lot of dust, but I blew the thing out anyway and put it back together, and its doing ok, as far as I can tell.

I'd be interested in knowing other slashdotter's experience with maintaining their devices in this way and where possible. And I actually extending the life of my devices, or am I just wasting my time?"

Announcements

Submission + - Gandalf/Magneto To Officiate At Picard/Professor X Wedding (www.cbc.ca)

Freshly Exhumed writes: On the Jonathan Ross Show, Sir Ian McKellen, best known to SciFi fans as Magneto and/or Gandalf, revealed that he will be officiating at the wedding of his long time friend and fellow actor, Patrick Stewart, who will soon be marrying his jazz-singer fiance Sunny Ozell. Quipped McKellen: 'I’m going to marry Patrick...' 'How else do you put that? I’m going to officiate at his wedding.'
Democrats

Submission + - Internet Sales Tax Vote This Week In US Senate (cnet.com)

SonicSpike writes: "From TFA: "Internet tax supporters are hoping that a vote in the U.S. Senate as early as today will finally give them enough political leverage to require Americans to pay sales taxes when shopping online.

Sens. Mike Enzi (R-Wy.) and Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) are expected to offer an amendment to a Democratic budget resolution this week that, by allowing states to "collect taxes on remote sales," is intended to usher in the first national Internet sales tax.""

Google

Submission + - Google Keep Labelled "Delete" (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "The Google Keep note-keeping app has had a frosty reception. Analysts including Gartner have said its functionality is laughable compared to that of the rival Evernote (saying "it’s like saying MSFT Paint is a threat to Photoshop") and other users have rejected it on the grounds that after the death sentence on Reader, Google can't be trusted not to pull the plug on a service which people have come to rely on."
Privacy

Submission + - Twitter-shaming can cost you your job - whether you're giving or receiving (infoworld.com)

tsamsoniw writes: "Hoping to strike a blow against sexism in the tech industry, developer and tech evangelist Adria Richards took to Twitter to complain about two male developers swapping purportedly offensive jokes at PyCon. The decision has set into motion a chain of events that illustrate the impact a tweet or two can make in this age of social networking: One the developers and Richards have since lost their jobs, and even the chair of PyCon has been harassed for his minor role in the incident."
Education

Submission + - Kids Build Pill Dispenser to Win Raspberry Pi Award (channelbiz.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "The first Raspberry Pi Awards have picked the best projects built by schoolchildren using the Raspberry Pi. The winners included a team of 8 to 11 year olds, who built a door-answering machine for elderly or disabled people, and a team of 12 to 16 year olds, who made an automated pill dispenser for forgetful patients. Other categories included adults, who built a wireless home power consumption system."
Google

Submission + - Post "Good Google", Who Will Defend The Open Web?

psykocrime writes: "The crazy kids at Fogbeam Labs have started a discussion about Google and their relationship with the Open Web, and questioning who will step up to defend these principles, even as Google seem to be abdicating their position as such a champion. Some candidates mentioned include Yahoo, IBM, Red Hat, Mozilla, Microsoft and The Wikimedia Foundation, among others. The question is, what organization(s) have BOTH the necessary clout and the required ethical principles, to truly champion the Open Web, in the face of commercial efforts which are clearly inimical to Open Source, Open Standards, Libre Culture and other elements of an Open Web?"

Submission + - Apple ban "Sweatshop themed" game from app store (pocketgamer.co.uk)

danhuby writes: Apple have removed sweatshop-themed game Sweatshop HD by UK developers LittleLoud from their app store citing clause 16.1 — "Apps that present excessively objectionable or crude content will be rejected.". According to the PocketGamer article, Littleloud's head of games, Simon Parkin, told Pocket Gamer that "Apple removed Sweatshop from the App Store last month stating that it was uncomfortable selling a game based around the theme of running a sweatshop."

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